Glenn

Show me your blacksmith pets

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 This is red , he dosent give a hoot about forging. Hunting now that's a deferent story. 

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Red looks like a good boy. I like working dogs, give him a scratch for me please.

Frosty The Lucky.

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That's a bit of a circus act on the log. I guess Red is good at walking backwards. Looks a bit narrow to turn on.

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This would be Yukon, who seems to insist that my new anvil stand (or anvil on the stand, I am not sure how far he is trying to go) is his new toy and has taken to trying to climb on top of it.

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Yep. Those eyes are definitely focused on something!

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Heres Einstien getting some attention from the butchers brush. Sorry that Stryper is so loud in the background. I was rockin out when when he came to visit me :-)

 

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I use a stainless steel welder's brush on my kitty-shedders.   Much more effective than the small brushes they sell in pet stores...

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That's a genuine real blacksmith shop cat alright. I'm going to have to give it a try with out house cats. How long did you have to leave Einstein in the forge to get orange heat?

Frosty The Lucky.

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At home we have 3 cats and 4 house rabbits. At my forge there is a squirrel that runs round outside. 

The photo is Squidgit, a rescue rabbit we took in. His mum died and he was hand reared at a rescue center before he came to us. 

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Pretty rabbit. Vermin here. You can be fined for keeping rabbits in Queensland. Here's a sign at the border:

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This little guy's not quite in my smithy, but the cats deposited him on the back porch yesterday afternoon.  I brought him in and put him in a box with a lamp for heat, and he's eating goat milk.  I saw two of the cats on the porch studying something under a hassock, so I went out with a flashlight and looked.  I saw the little guy's mama staring back at me.  My wife rounded up the cats and put them in the garage while I brought the little guy out and put him as far back under the hassock as I could reach, hoping she'd take him home during the night.  No such luck.  She was gone this morning, but he was still there.

Meet Ruckus, Jr., the flying squirrel... and his mama.

 

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Ruckus Mama.jpg

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Snork is a great looking Pug Daguy.  Ours is just over a year and a half old.  I'll round up some shots of Brownie when I get home.

 

Fun fact: Pugs were originally bred for the sole purpose of human companionship. No other job.

I'm sure Daguy can confirm that pugs can be very needy and underfoot, like a lot. But wouldn't trade her in for anything. 

Maybe a powerhammer....but that's where I draw the line.

 

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Wow, Olf. That flying squirrel is so similar to our sugar glider. We untangled this little guy from a wire fence after he got his glide approach wrong.

 

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Yep, I'm sure they're distant cousins.  Your glider appears to have a longer face and bigger ears.  This family apparently lives in a huge pine tree in our goat pen.  I've been finding shucked pine cones all over the pen for years.  First time I've seen one of the occupants, though.

 

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Mr. Olfart,

Said,

"Yep I'm sure they're distant cousins..."

Sugar gliders are VERY distant cousins to North American flying squirrels.

Sugar gliders are marsupials. The females have a pouch to rear their young.

Flying squirrels do not have such a pouch. Because they are mammals. The fetus remains in the uterus (womb), until term. (i.e. birth).

Both animals are good examples of convergent evolution.

That is a set of similar adaptations to a suit a given environment.

Incidentally, flying squirrels are the most common squirrels found in North America.

They are nocturnal so they are far less noticed than daylight animals. (diurnal).

SLAG.

 

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Those fellows are GREAT glider pilots. The come in and somehow calculate their flight trajectory so they can flair out into a climb just before they land. They do it so well that there is very little impact and it is just a matter of grabbing hold. The fun part is that they are completely silent in flight, no engine noise at all. 

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Oh, I guess I learned something today. Pretty sad actually. I guess it turns out the 10+ squirrels our cat killed this past month weren't the grey squirrels that are eating everything that grows in our garden. They were flying squirrels. :(

On a more positive note, here's my blacksmith pet! He's a 14 year old Russian Tortoise: (I also have a cat, as mentioned above....)

 

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On 10/1/2018 at 1:10 AM, SLAG said:

Sugar gliders are VERY distant cousins to North American flying squirrels. Sugar gliders are marsupials. The females have a pouch to rear their young.

Thanks for that bit of enlightenment, Mr. Slag!

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