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I Forge Iron

'alternate' traditional hobies/ handcrafts.


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I am basically into hunting and fishing since I was very young with my father. I enjoy carpentry work and do remodeling work on the side and do a pretty fair job of it. I know a friend of a friend of a friend that does a little hobby distilling to make some wonderfully aged whiskey. I put in a very good garden and love to can, basically everything from apple sauce to venison with some very nice pickle recopies (the trick is using hot garlic). Myself and two buddies I hunt with make and smoke our own sausages and jerky. I shoot a lot and reload ammunition. My only daughter is more than half way through her 6 year stint of college so it frees up some time that was hard to come by when she was home. 

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Since we're talking about the hobbies of our significant others as well (blacksmithing is just about the only hobby I have) I'll take the opportunity to brag a little on my girlfriend's work. She recently got into dollhouses and her skills with clay and a craft knife put my skills with heat and hammer to shame!

She buys unfinished houses and then makes everything to outfit them properly. Below is the tiled roof for a late 19th century London banker's house. Each tile was individually made and glued down. That's over 1500 tiles, not including the ridgecap! Now she has mover on to the interior and is trying to build a clock. Not sure if she's going for a replica or a working miniature at this point...

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Cool thread.  Glad it was resurrected.  I am coming back to my large cameras.  While I use my digital camera a lot, my large format cameras are calling me.  I dusted off the 8x10 a few days ago, and started looking for all of my processing equipment.

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I've got all too many hobbies to keep up with, most probably not all that interesting to the group here (restoring and playing antique wooden flutes, kayaking, boomerangs and hand launched gliders, target archery, origami and ornamental knotwork...), but the one I jumped most deeply into was off hand glassblowing.  Actually it is a hobby now, but at one point was my vocation, so not sure if that qualifies.

Here are some of the older shots of my work (not brilliant photos unfortunately, but that is what I've got):

multi-color%20optics_zps3bhf4l65.jpg  Venetian Style functional vessels

3walkingsticks.jpg   Larger sculptural works (~4' long typically)

painterlyclassic.jpg  Small classic vase

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Wow.  Splendid thread. I am fascinated by far too many things to be accomplished in a single one of my passions. Years ago, when we bought our little place on the side of a small mountain east of San Diego, I thought I had found one simple art that I could focus on and excel at. What could be simpler than mud??  WRONG! I built an elutriation column which produced an ochre micaceous "liquor".  The tendrils shown here were fired to red heat with a propane torch. Ever since I have been bogged down in the mud studying van der waals forces, colloids, and thixotropes. I am growing black locusts for lumber (I have a thirty foot log curing) and for carbon. Growing mulberry and olive trees and anything else that pokes up. I enjoy scrap lumber carpentry, prospecting, mineralogy, shooting, industrial anthrpology, blah blah. Our mountain is a giant block of iron ore, so I hope to pass on while following my dream of developing iron-infused ceramics. Mrs. Taylor helps in the shop, is a domestic engineer, is a counsellor and comforter to many, and supports me so I can keep a full-time job.            

Latticino:  Very Humbling to post right after you, and your exquisite photographic resume, not to mention all of those who posted before you.

Robert Taylor

 

 

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I think you are the first person studying Industrial Anthropology I have met sort of  in person; though I know a large number involved in Industrial Archeology; many through the archeological Metallurgy mailing list and attending medieval technology conferences and the Ironmasters' Conference  when it was at Athens OH.  I'm rereading  Nuts and Bolts of the Past: A History of American Technology : 1776-1860 right now as I lucked onto a hardback copy at the local library store recently to take the place of my paperback.  Interesting idea(s) and probably would count as Anthropology.

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Wow, I just love this thread! Such interesting folk.

Latticino, I don't know if you're aware but in the Cairo museum they have boomerangs that came out of an Egyptian tomb!

They are in a small nondescript display case somewhat off the beaten track, about as far as you could get from the 'main' attractions of 'Tutankhamen's tomb ' and they look just like Australian curios. 

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35 minutes ago, ianinsa said:

Wow, I just love this thread! Such interesting folk.

Latticino, I don't know if you're aware but in the Cairo museum they have boomerangs that came out of an Egyptian tomb!

They are in a small nondescript display case somewhat off the beaten track, about as far as you could get from the 'main' attractions of 'Tutankhamen's tomb ' and they look just like Australian curios. 

Cool, great info, though I doubt I'll be getting out there to visit any time soon.  Saw what might have been a similar display many years ago (so the brain may be failing a bit) in the open case storage in the Anthropological Museum in Vancouver, Canada.  A fantastic museum if anyone ever gets the chance to visit.

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Some brain tan whitetail hides I tanned some time back.  I used to love tanning hides, but haven't tanned in ages. :(

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Ya can't tan hides without doing stuff with those hides, so I made a pouch for holding all my bow-drilll fire making stuff.

 

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I was a professional woodworker for a number of years and still occasionally mess around with it a bit; at the moment, I'm working on a free-form cheese tray/shallow bowl and a sculpture that will involve some ironwork. I've also done bits of leatherwork, a fair amount of pottery (although not for years), weaving (even longer), some photography, a lot of gardening and cooking. I've made a PVC horse bow and plan to make some arrows and a target pretty soon.

My wife is a classically trained violist (Oberlin Conservatory and the Julliard School) and has played with all manner of ensembles and musicians (including Ray Charles, Elton John, and Julie Andrews).

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  • Glenn unpinned this topic
  • 3 years later...

  I once ran across a thread about what members or their family/friends enjoyed as a hobby other than, or complimentary to metalworking, blacksmithing and I searched but can't find it.  Glass blowing, needle work, woodworking, etc... I try.... :)  Any idea?  Thanks.

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Most anything applies to this diverse group, including calligraphy, photography, herpetology, raising animals, gardening, brewing, and the list goes on and on.

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  Absolutely Glenn, how could it be otherwise...:)  Variety is the Spice of Life!  I just wanted to re-read that thread and possibly post some things instead of starting a new one.  I cannot find it....

 

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Thanks Frazer, those bring back some good memories. Deb and I were about out of Pygmy goats around then I think. I'm happy to say our departure from Barn life hasn't diminished the group's polygot personality. Chellie has been maintaining caprine cultivation for us. Among others I assume but She's admits it. :)

Speaking of goat farms, when Deb and I got together and we bought this land we were wondering about a farm name, Deb has her registered herd name but the farm needed one. One suggestion we got from a member of the Artmetal.list I really liked but got the veto from Deb was, "Frosty Goose's Goats." Deb's web handle at the time was Snowgoose. 

Any of you who do or have raised livestock know how often a person needs to goose the critters, sometimes with implements. We had lubricant in a gallon pump jug next to the drawers with the selection of gloves and implements. 

Frosty The Lucky. 

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  That's the one.  Thanks Frazer.  I will read them both, when I wake up enough!  I do framed tile mosaics of prehistoric fossil fish (among leather/wood working, farm market garden, cooking etc...etc...) .  Some people call me "fishbones" lol.  I like fish a lot, and not just on a plate... :D  I have to locate some digital pictures though.  Seems like I am always searching for something. :)

  Mostly, I just wanted to re-read the "alternate" thread.

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Nodebt, if you ever get out to western Wyoming near the town of Kemmerer (where JC Penny got his start) there are several commercial fossil fish quarries where, for a fee, you can excavate your own fossil fish from the Eocene (about 45 million years ago) lake beds.  You can also find things like palm fronds and occasionally things like bats.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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  George, if that was in my backyard I would be calling in sick at work a lot.  Field day!  Kind of like cracking or sawing a geode open to see what suprise lies inside.  Bats?  Interesting.... I have a polished ammonite I found in a shady neighborhood shop in Tangier when I was in the Navy but would love to have an actual fish.  My mosaics come from internet pictures of actual specimens.  Here is one, I have made about ten but never took pictures.  Kodak days....  They aren't that great but very fun, distracting and satisfying when you grout them and the pattern comes together.  How would you like a school of these swirling around in the ole swimming hole?  

 

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Have you done a Toilacanth? An up the gullet view of a great white might be cool. You have my mental wheels turning with ideas. I don't think Deb would appreciate it if I started packing buckets of broken tiles home though. <sigh>

Frosty The Lucky.

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  Now my wheels are turning with the shark idea!  Stop it!  Stop it!  As an aside, as you know, I am moving and have several buckets of tile pieces yet to find a home.  We could split the shipping....  Deb need never know.... :ph34r:

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