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I Forge Iron

Frazer

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Everything posted by Frazer

  1. I can't tell if it's a reflection or a seam down the length from casting, but did you try spark testing it to see it it's cast iron or steel?
  2. SharkBait (broo-ha-ha), to get the most out of your piece of track as an anvil, it is generally recommended to mount it vertically to maximize the amount of mass under your piece/hammer. I have also seen people grind all sorts of things (ie. fuller, hot cut, mini horn, etc.) into the web and feet of the track, which can help with the lack of a hardie hole for your bottom tools. That step in the stump that was taken out for weight reduction looks like it would be perfect for remounting it vertically while keeping the height about the same. It also frees up that top surface for mounting a vise o
  3. Frosty, they might have added the branding into the mold for the later models? You can see a pretty clear "faceplate" on mine.
  4. For what it's worth the logo on my 1920 Soderfors is all impressioned into the anvil, not protruding out, but it's cast steel. Regardless she's a BEAUTY. I'm sure you're looking forward to putting her to work!
  5. I'll start by saying that if it's over Frosty's head it's way over mine. However, I'll add my 1.5 cents nonetheless. 1. leaving a piece of steel in a camp fire will not result in wrought iron.. WI has it's characteristic properties due to it's low carbon content and slag inclusions within the bar itself. Perhaps you have a bar of annealed decarburized steel, but it's not wrought. 2. It kind of sounds like (at least the theory of your approach) sintered powdered metal parts (it's most often used in gears and brass bushings). But I don't think it would work the way you describe. You ne
  6. Alexandr, incredible as always. It's incredible how clean and polished your work comes out. I'm beginning to think you are in actuality a CNC machine. Or perhaps some generation of AI... Bluerooster, generally if you're going to use anything but mild for tongs, it's for weight reduction, but if you're forging them thick, or perhaps standard thickness, using medium/high carbon/tool steel (I have no idea what your lug wrench was made with) is generally just going to cause more headache than benefit IMHO. Save that stuff for things that need it. On the bright side, even the one that broke ca
  7. Are you cutting straight onto your anvil face? If so, it may help to have a mild steel cutting block under your piece so the tip isn't getting pushed onto hardened steel. It may also protect the face of your anvil if your slitter is still pretty hard when it makes its way through. That being said, just looking at the temper colors in the tip, it was definitely pretty hot and needs to be cooled much more often like TP said. If you're using spring steel for your tools, just make sure the tip isn't red hot (it happens) when you quench it to avoid potential cracking (...it happens ).
  8. I have never used the mattress pump personally, but that recommendation does come from a reliable, one might even say lucky, source. I will say your forge is pretty big, perhaps a little too big depending on what size stock you plan to be working with. If you're concerned about cost, burning way more fuel than you need is a good way to increase your cost of running the forge. You could probably adjust the size with some firebricks or even dry clay bricks. How big/small? I would say play around with that to see what works for you. IMHO, it's better to have too much air and divert the exces
  9. A leaf blower is way too much air. An inline fan will not worksince it can't overcome the back pressure. One option that is inexpensive and works well to start is a hairdryer blowing cool air. Blowing hot air will burn it out faster. Even a hairdryer on low can be too much air so you want to have a T somewhere with a valve/sliding shutter to vent off the excess. It is kind of loud though. Quieter than a leaf blower, but still loud. Another thing I had that worked for a while was a furnace blower that came out of a fireplace. Quieter, but ended up burning out. Another thing I have see
  10. I will say not between your teeth. Remember you are incising the steel, not your tounge.
  11. Frazer is my last name, my touchmark is a Z due to the spelling of it which differs from the common spelling which generally involves an "I" and/or an "S". My first name is Brady. Yes, like Tom Brady. Fun fact my middle name is indeed Thomas...
  12. David, looks pretty good to me. I have one with a HC cutting edge welded in and honestly it rolls over all the time anyway. It lost it's temper long ago and I haven't bothered to fix it. I would say 1045 will be more than sufficient. Then again what do I know. Finally finished hammer number 2 today. Well, technically it's hammer number 3... Hammer #2 now lives in the box of shame after I burnt it in half... I'm not entirely sure how much it weighs since I don't have my kitchen scale handy, but somewhere between 1-1.5#s if I had to guess. Made from a piece of RR track. I d
  13. Haha nice. It's okay my team is disliked my many. I'm a Bruins fan. Have been since I was a kid.
  14. The bed of caulk will do a more to kill the sound than hockey pucks I imagine. It will be in contact with the whole bottom rather than just in a few spots. You could always test that first though by checking the ring with nothing between the anvil and stand, then checking it again with the pucks in place. If it helps then go for it (I would add the caulk too though). Are there holes through all four feet of the anvil? If so a lag bolt through each foot and maybe a couple straps around the waist for good measure should be plenty to get that thing mounted. P.S. As a fellow hockey fan
  15. My anvil sits on a 12"x12" block just like that. It isn't secured to the ground with anything, but sometimes when working on the horn it does rotate around (block and all) a bit. But I'm not chasing it around anywhere. How heavy is your anvil? If it's lighter than 150#s you may have more trouble with it moving around on you.
  16. Chad, this story has pretty much all the information you need (you may have to scroll down to read it). I think that both the smith and the hammer could benefit from a light soak in scotch, but not so much that the authorities come from your chanting. That may distract your mental equilibrium at such a critical moment.
  17. Made a quick wall mount for the trivet. Simple, but effective.
  18. That is probably a good idea as well. It does sit rather low profile. About 1 inch away from the table surface, minus however much I filed away to make it lay flat.
  19. Thank you, I'm going to make a hook of some sort for it. I figure It will look nice on the wall in the kitchen. It may need little silicone feet for under the collars before it get used though. Putting a cast iron pan with some sizzling good stuff on it as it stands may make it a little too hot for the table. Not sure yet.
  20. I am also living in a residential neighborhood. Luckily my neighbor is a good guy, but we did have to lay out some ground rules since even with my anvil quieted down to more a thud, the constant hammering is enough to get under anyone's skin. I have been looking for a house with more space for a while now, but most places are priced high lately. When the annoying one is you, in my experience, it's nice to be on good terms with the neighbors. They should enjoy their living space too. The occasional forged item for them helps as well.
  21. Might as well add mine here since it seems to apply. Here is my first go at a trivet. It turned out a little wonky, but it was a fun little project. Very different from other things I've done thus far. It's made from 1/4" x 1/2" bar stock. Looking back I definitely I did things out of order. I ended up fighting with the forge welds for the diamond more than I expected and the twists in the center turned out very uneven. Next time I would make those 4 pieces first and forge weld them together last. The way I did it resulted in a very unwieldy object at times. Collars turned out
  22. Forging in space and/or your local vacuum chamber will also dampen the ring of the anvil. Forge welds might improve too. Provided you have an induction furnace.. Hmmm... I propose an underwater vacuum chamber. No further concerns about noise sensitive neighbors like mine... I like this plan.
  23. Ever since I started I have turned into one in the making. Everyone I know knows to call me if they come across someone selling tools or has a barn full of "old stuff" I can poke around in. Needless to say I have more things laying around than I have space to put them. You never know what you need 'till you need it. Then it becomes a game of "wheredi-puddit"...
  24. I have some of the old steel too, it is indeed quite nice to work. Soft like WI, but not prone to splitting. Thanks for the clarification. Lemon, It'll be nice to have put your own personal touch on the straps for your door. While you have it hot, maybe add your touch mark somewhere? You may not have made them, but you did modify them..? Maybe you make the next pair for your next door? Sounds like a fun project.
  25. WI has very dull sparks with little to no "sparkler" or "firework" effect... Actually, there is an image posted by Jim Coke and Another FrankenBurner in a thread here that explains it better than I can. TP, is your recommendation not to quench A-36 to avoid warping or accidental hardening? I know A-36 is a strength spec and doesn't indicate composition, butare there actually batches of A-36 that could actually be damaged by a quench in water? By that I mean cracking at the time of the quench or breaking when mounted. It's an honest question. Lemon, to me that looks like mild, not WI.
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