Steve Sells

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About Steve Sells

  • Rank
    Administrator, Curmudgeon, Author

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  • Website URL
    http://www.fenrisforge.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Ft Wayne IN, USA Fenris Forge LLC
  • Interests
    Bladesmithing, Jujitsu

Converted

  • Location
    Ft Wayne Indiana, USA
  • Biography
    Father of 2, Grandfather of 2
  • Interests
    Bladesmithing, Jujuitsu
  • Occupation
    Electrician

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48,036 profile views
  1. First off normalizing before annealing is a waste of time , and second, I agree the annealing is not a good idea. If you do anneal you will need to normalize a few times afterward to reduce grain sizes. I would just normalize, harden then temper
  2. I use McMaster Carr 11 second oil, the pinned post covers most of it here https://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/33919-oil-quench-what-type-to-use/
  3. Since you are too busy complaining to read what was posted, I will inform you that there were answers given, and a few questions asked that the OP refused to answer.
  4. What didnt you understand about the pinned post about heat treating at the top of the page?
  5. Technically you are not running a 3ph motor from single phase power, you are running a converter with the single phase, which in turn operates the motor. This is not 100% efficient either, there are conversion losses to account for
  6. Muriatic acid or Ferric Chloride will do it
  7. looks like wrought iron
  8. there is no reason to rush, enjoy the read and you will get more from it than when rushing through.
  9. We have an entire section devoted to gas forges, perhaps you will get better information if this was posted there, I will move it for you. Read through the section and you may get some ideas
  10. what ever the name plate says is fine. Amps x Volts equals power factor. so listing 10 amps @ 110 volts means it uses 1100 watts listing 10 amps @ 125 volts means it uses 1250 watts.
  11. In the USA power is about 125 volts per line at the transformer. Code allows a 5% drop to the meter, then another 5% of that from the meter base to the outlet, so that is why there can be 110v, 115v or 120v listed interchangeably for a rating
  12. I closed my Dojo years ago, 2 of my higher ranked students teach still, I occasionally assist them. I only expect my Masters title to be used when I teach, outside of class most of my students call me Steve
  13. There is nothing to be sorry about, you may get your answer here, Just an FYI is all, I will relocate this