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I Forge Iron

Anachronist58

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Everything posted by Anachronist58

  1. Grrr. One of the reasons I opted for two oxy tanks. Sabre saw - I have no spare for that, just alternate means of severance... Robert Taylor
  2. Very fine images and descriptions, much appreciated. Robert Taylor
  3. 40%, fresh vinegar (acetic acid) at 14 hours. Phasing from stipping, over to some sort of corrosion inhibiting patination, all in the same jar. Caution: There was a notable pressure increase at living room temperature, had to relieve it 3 t in 14 hours. Do Not Sniff Jar. Robert Taylor Have you been exposed to hammer toning your bells? The Hammer peening causes differential (sic) hardening and helps to give voice. Quite a good pinch that you have on there... Robert
  4. Agree with all of the above. I have a karachi #5, but having just now (again) looked at the UK site, I would certainly go for several of the used ones currently for sale... Robert Taylor
  5. I support JHCC's premise. My 5 ton flypress gets used for so many different projects. It is a great mechanics tool, and not only can one aggressively work metals hot or cold, but also with delicacy and finesse.... Sure would like to see a pic or five of that flypress... Robert Taylor
  6. Hello Dex, welcome to the Forum. Looking forward to your engagement. This community is made up of Humans from across the globe, been my home away from home for eight years and counting... Robert Taylor
  7. Glenn, well said. I find the result to be quite satisfactory... Robert Taylor
  8. Forging a T-bone... And coking wood... Robert Taylor (T - bone later hot cut on a ceramic anvil):-)
  9. Then I suggest that you edit your comments before posting... Robert Taylor
  10. Yes it is possible to change out the jaws on some on some pipe vises, not possible (unless one can make the jaw(s) one's self) on others. I had to make my own top jaw for my big pipie vise - not a job for those with limited "resources". Robert Taylor
  11. Qb, that is an odd thing to say, as we cannot answer a question that you have not asked. Please correct me if I am mistaken... To answer your new question, can you imagine a use for it? I have one mounted adjacent to my post vise, and find it to be quite handy. Be sure it has a complete set of jaws - top and bottom. That is what makes it valuable, or not... We can not tell much about its value from the grainy image prvided.... Robert Taylor
  12. Once again, going off the rails on a crazy train, but I must say, I will restrike the OP gong and say: A venerable member of this body has published his moniker, 'bei hammer and hand, all arts do stand'. I take this to heart, as iron, ()oxides, and on and on, of alumnina, et al., all rise, often closely bonded [...]. That being said, the first thing I tend to ask a thing is, 'Are you a bell? Do you rIng?' Robert Taylor
  13. Glenn, Depends on how fast I get. Were it profitable, I would make hundreds... The current tooling is adequate for giving them away as gifts, but not for sales... the drawing and blanking can be sped up substantially, but I am enjoying the texturing a bit to much to mechanize at present. I am just grateful right now to be able to walk and breathe :+D... Robert Taylor
  14. Second iteration of two bit flower. Now I develop a set of feature-driven dies: Knife blanks from bimetal commercial bandsaw blade: Had to thin this file to .041" thick to finish the blade holder: Time to slice and dice: And here is the kaboodle: Note to self - do not vein the petals when fatigued and up against a deadline... these are a good bit more inconsistent than what I was going for: Driving up to Ventura, California, today to deliver the goods. Thanks for looking, Robert Taylor
  15. Well done, and all of the praise thus far is rightfully earned. Having read all of page seven of this thread, I must now start on page six! Robert Taylor
  16. Little nickel cokes in a stand up machine at the gas station on Telegraph Canyon Road! Robert Taylor
  17. Stove elbow endured fifteen years of heat and weather cycling - no complaints. This week when I slammed the front door on the furnace, it just went blehhhh... all better now!
  18. Welcome from San Diego to Santa Barbara! Robert Taylor
  19. Congratulations on a successful tear down, Jennifer. And thanks for the comprehensive narrative... When the machine guard craze ran through my last Aerospace plant, it was very disruptive. Fortunately, we were able to keep the "fixers" out of the Tool & Cutter dept., as many operations have to be open gear, period. ('nose to the grind stone' is not 'just' a saying). Guards where they are sensible, but we do love to to see fine machines doing their stuff... Robert Taylor
  20. Having abrasive cut a lot of tool/high speed steels, I would say that you are on to something. I have found that in the perfect storm, (four?) factors can bring trouble: The abrasive cutoff process is, in part, incendiary in nature. The sharp grits of the wheel cut chips nearly identical to short mill cuttings, and these chips, as they ignite, efficiently carry nearly all of the heat out of the cut zone. If the wheel's surface speed falls below the necessary minimum, that process ceases. This causes the the wheel and/or the work to overheat: the wheel grit can melt (glaze), and the cut zone can work harden and/or oxidize. Efficient cutoff is sustained by cutting, not rubbing. What to do? Obtain an inexpensive single point diamond to remove wheel glaze. Do not allow heat to build up in the wheel and work - allow the wheel to run and cool the work. If the work needs more time to cool, shut off and come back (I would have to employ more aggressive cooling due to production demands). Feel, speed, and spark are very important feedback... If you feel your wheel speed dropping, get out and peck. Worse case (if possible) - rotate you work to expose fresh meat... One should find that most cutoffs in a well tuned process are like hot butter... constructive criticism always welcome... Robert Taylor
  21. "dovesti do uma" Alexadr, Google translate: "bring to mind", which could be said as: "remind me of"; "make me think of"; "look(s) like beautiful, perfect, roses"... Better translators than I, on this thread... Robert Taylor
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