Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Arc welding for the outlet-challenged


Recommended Posts

While I have a Lincoln AC/DC 225/125 welder, I don’t have anywhere to plug it in.  Lately, I have been toying with the idea of purchasing one of those little IBGT dual voltage stick welders with an eye to running it off 110V.  I am not a professional welder (obviously), but I would occasionally like to lay down a bead or two.   If I use 2# of rod in a year, I would be amazed.  
 

That said, what can I do with one of these, particularly off a 20A breaker?  Can I use multiple passes to weld even thicker bits of steel albeit at a much slower rate?  What if I upgrade to a 30A breaker?

 

Thanks, 

Rob

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there a reason you can't add a 240V outlet? If there is, you can use a high end 120V wire welder for things up to 1/4 or 3/8" with practice. It however will not get good penetration on heavier stock.

We have used a Millermatic 120V on 20A circuits, on that welder going to a 30A will not help because it uses under 20A. I do not know about the "IBGT" welders.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, that’s IGBT.  Think

[Commercial link removed]

I have also been setting up a forge at a local maker space, and 110v is all I have to work with there.

 

Thanks,

Rob

Edited by Mod34
Commercial link removed per TOS
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been really happy with my little Horror Fright flux core welder that runs off of 110. Also not a welder but with the occasional need to lay down a bead. Works great for up to 1/4 inch steel and I've only once bumped up against the duty cycle. and at less than $100 delivered it's proven its worth

Link to post
Share on other sites

OP, if you plan on doing much welding now or in the future, I highly recommend (as others have) going to 230/240 VAC.  The returns, both satisfaction-wise and welder-wise, will be greatly appreciated.  Your welds will be much better quality and choice of quality welders is much more extensive.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would use 220 if I could, but you're missing the point.  I want to know what one of these 110 stick (NOT fcaw) machines CAN do.  I see that my link to Amazon is gone, but for those who are trying to figure out what I have in mind, think Everlast 140ST.  That one is 110 only, iirc, and comes with TIG accessories, but there are similar dual voltage welders which just come with a stinger and not a TIG torch.

Link to post
Share on other sites

tig torch with line will not break you , you will also need to get gas and regulator or flow meter and then consumables. Invest in the best you can afford for now and go with it. I won't try to figure out anything for you,you will have to do that yourself after doing your research. It is your decision to make.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Even a small welder can be of tremendous value to your workshop. I made a ton of stuff for my shop -- from my anvil stand to my treadle hammer to both my gas and coal forges to my striking anvil to my hammer stand to a whole bunch of jigs and miscellaneous tools -- with a 110v welder. The only thing that required something beefier was the frame on my hydraulic press, so I got a friend with a Lincoln tombstone (IFI member Fowllife) to weld that up for me. The long and the short of it is that you will find all manner of uses for it, even if you're not going to be making anything that can withstand significant mechanical loads.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there anywhere you can plug in? 220 is really a minimum. There are some 110 welders that are ok, but just ok. Arc welding pulls some power. I used to run my shop off this massive ( and expensive) extension cord plugged into a dryer outlet in the basement of the house. It is 150 ft of #4 3 strand outdoor rated. I think it was around $500 in '95. It would probably be better and more cost effective to upgrade your box, or bring in a new one. I had code issues at the old place that made that a problem.

20191114_170554.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Folks,

Would a portable generator be a practical and an affordable solution for a welder, and welding set-up?

I am electrically challenged hence the question.

Hoping to see an answer, real soon.

Thanks,

SLAG.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/13/2019 at 8:10 AM, JHCC said:

Even a small welder can be of tremendous value to your workshop. I made a ton of stuff for my shop -- from my anvil stand to my treadle hammer to both my gas and coal forges to my striking anvil to my hammer stand to a whole bunch of jigs and miscellaneous tools -- with a 110v welder. The only thing that required something beefier was the frame on my hydraulic press, so I got a friend with a Lincoln tombstone (IFI member Fowllife) to weld that up for me. The long and the short of it is that you will find all manner of uses for it, even if you're not going to be making anything that can withstand significant mechanical loads.

What kind of breaker did you need?  Also, if time is not an issue, can you weld thicker steel with multiple passes with one of these on 110v?

 

Thx

Link to post
Share on other sites

My sole outlet in the garage is on a 20 amp breaker, which I've tripped a few times. I've welded up to 1/2" with multiple passes, but not anything that I'd trust for withstanding the working load of a power hammer or a hydraulic press.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Slag, Sorry for the late reply, I just saw your question. A portable may be your best option, plus you'll have a generator if the electric goes out at your house. Miller, Lincoln and Hobart are three common ones that can provide size/type welder you need. I have a Miller Bobcat that's 25+ yrs. old that handles anything I need to weld and used to be my emergency generator for the house, ran 9 days straight after Hurricane Gustav. I loaded it in the back of my Polaris Ranger six years ago so I could get 8 miles in the woods to a dozer, with a broken C frame, and weld it back together. Must have done a good job because the dozer is still running and everything is holding up.  I wish it was one of the newer ones with CC/CV so I could run Mig off it, but until it shuts down it wont be replaced.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I have an Everlast PP205SI, it's a good multi process machine.  Not as good a the blue or red ones, but it does what I ask it to do.  If you have a budget, I wouldn't hesitate to buy an Everlast.  I always thought that mig was much easier and cleaner process than arc.  You should look at the Power IMig 140, about the same money as the Power Arc 140.  If you don't have a bottle, use flux core until you can get a bottle.  The 140 stick is a dual voltage machine, you only get 80A on 110v, the 140 mig is a 110v machine with 140A.  With 140A, you should be able to weld 1/4" to 5/16" in a single pass, 1/2" with multi pass.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...