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I Forge Iron

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I purchased this well forged piece. It is 9" tall and the lily is 4" wide, mostly of 1/8" thick stock carefully hammered leaving the raised, medial vein on the flower. I think there is a little oxy/acetylene work on the collar backs and at the candle point bases.

527.JPG

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Here are a couple from one of the previous posts that have had pictures go missing from, one is a quick and eay top for a backplate

56e87c7aeda96_FleurdeLyshotcutonplate.th

 

These are ready to be firewelded to a railing infil bar

56e87c8c29cb5_FleurdeLysonbarforrailing.

56e87c99669b0_Fleurdelysonbarforrailingi

I can elaborate if needed.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/15/2016 at 6:33 AM, vulcan_ said:

hi folks .. i am late coming to this party, but i wanted to mention that all of the images in this thread have fallen off of the site. There are broken links where the images used to be.

Known issue with the forum software. Alas, nothing to be done about it.

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very cool! i'll watch the rest of that series when i have the time! 

Was that a paper bag on the riveters head? hehe all good. love watching how they do that stuff. 

Always learning... never having the time to practice...

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On 3/15/2016 at 6:33 AM, vulcan_ said:

 

1 hour ago, Francis Trez Cole said:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPpGcVGhUzg

Here is a great video on the subject

Featuring my old teacher!

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The fleur de lys always has a collar so I would make one this way - not by cutting. It is so much easier to do one in three pieces tackweld them together and put on the collar.

Google fleur de lys and look at the pictures there is any number of variants to be inspired of.

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14 hours ago, gote said:

The fleur de lys always has a collar so I would make one this way - not by cutting. It is so much easier to do one in three pieces tackweld them together and put on the collar.

Google fleur de lys and look at the pictures there is any number of variants to be inspired of.

that is exactly what I did.   As for welding up the hole...   This has long since been given as a wedding gift.   The new owners say it grows on them.  You also have to understand that this is New Orleans Saints country so the Fleur De lys has a different appreciation here than some of the rest of the country!

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  • 3 years later...
1 hour ago, Greg W. said:

What is the name of the marking pen/pencil used on the bar stock in the fleur de lis photo? I can’t locate it to purchase. The soapstone I have used is only good for rough work. Thanks

That particular pen is paper correction fluid, in the UK it can be purchased as Tippex or Snopake

Similar in operation to a ball point pen, Shake to agitate a ball internally to mix the fluid, then apply to the metal, depress the tip and squeeze gently to control the flow.

Do NOT apply to hot metal, or ball will get stuck as liquid hardens, resists heat up to a reasonably high red.

I am told the contents are a titatanium oxide, hence the heat resistance.

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Do a web search for "Steel marking pen." 

My old stand by "Brite White" ball point paint marker is near the top of the page. I only opened one of many pages of hits. 

I also have a tungsten scribe, "silver and red streaks" colored pencils for marking metal. Can't see a silver streak on shiny silver colored metals so you use the Red Streak. Yes?

If you do this long you WILL need different manners of marking your work and not always for hot surfaces. 

If you want to be sure on hot work you need a center punch and chisel.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I found a 1/4" brass rod mounted in a wooden handle with a point ground on the end at the fleamarket for under a dollar and picked it up on spec...

OTOH I've used rocks to mark lines on steel before---like I tell my students: "Any hammer in a storm!" as I pick up the nearest hammer and fix the issue they are having forging.  Trying to fight the belief that it's the hammer that counts not the skill and experience.

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Thomas it sounds like somebody wants us to take sharp brass rods and rocks to him! :o Just because someone's made doesn't mean they couldn't use a little trim.

Frosty The Lucky.

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