MrDarkNebulah

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About MrDarkNebulah

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    Senior Member
  • Birthday 09/29/1999

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Litchfield County, Connecticut.

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  1. Stuck in the city. Now what?

    Thanks for all the advice guys. I have yet to ask since classes are really starting to pile on. There are a few issues with me completing some of the advice. One, the secretary is a guy. Two, I dont have the time or ability to forge anything right now, hence the initial post. Thats a good point about trying to get a lot of people involved, Ill keep it limited to me for now. I'll let you guys now when I finally find time to ask.
  2. Stuck in the city. Now what?

    Thank you guys for all the advice. I have already talked to the engineering dean, but he sent me to the art school dean, who isn't in the office supposedly until next week. So my plan was to send an email and then follow up in person early next week. I'm also planning on talking to some of my friends in engineering to see if they want to try to join the adventure of blacksmithing. That way there seems like a stronger student desire so it's more likely he will agree. From the times the art dean has talked before I get the feeling that he would be ok with this anyways, as he seems like a really chill/understanding guy.
  3. Stuck in the city. Now what?

    So I checked out the sculpture shop and I found some good news and bad news. The good news is that the shop has a forge, two anvils, plenty of tools, and a bunch of casting materials. The bad news is that it apparently only for art and architecture students. I'm an engineering student. So I think the next step is to write a few emails and meet with a few people to see what I can do to bend the rules. I was thinking about the whole setting up on the dorm terrace but I dont think it will work. They are super strict with restricted materials, and one of those things is no grills/propane. Plus, like JHCC said its manhattan. Its hard to bring some of those things in from my house where I have them stored.
  4. Allright guys. I've been forging for almost two years now and I dont want to stop. However, I just moved into college. (Cooper Union in Manhattan if you're wondering). So now I'm stuck with wondering how do I continue forging when I have no space to do it. I know some people can do stock removal knives and heat treating on fire escapes. I dont have anywhere like that. I don't want to stop but it seems like thats my only option, especially on a college student budget.
  5. Simple Hunter

    Yea I wasn't sure what to do with that. I really only noticed it after the handle was attached. Once again, a good learning experience. That was something I was also worried about. I think it should be fine, as the knife won't be experiencing any heavy use, but still. Thanks for the compliments and critiques guys.
  6. Simple Hunter

    Thanks guys. The pins are copper because that was all that I had. I should've done them with a metal that matched the steel in colour, but lesson learned I guess.
  7. Simple Hunter

    This is the first knife that I've made that I'm actually happy with. Its a simple hunting knife that I made for my friend. The knife is forged from a leaf spring and ground with a 1 x 30 which is a pain to use and an angle grinder. The handle is ivory micarta. That would not have been my first choice for handle material, but the guy I was making it for insisted on it. After the forging was done, I showed the blank to him as well and he wanted the handle to be longer than it was initially was so I welded on another half inch or so. I personally think it is too long now and out of proportion, but when I gave it to him he said it was perfect. It is hand sanded to 600 grit and then I used a finishing sponge. This is also the first knife that I am happy with the plunge lines as well, as I finally got around to using a guard/jig for that. All in all I am pretty happy with it. Please Critique.
  8. My 3rd? Knife WIP

    Thank you all for the critique. TP, I did accidentally burn the tip a bit while forging, so I had to grind off an inch or so of it. I was able to grind out the remaining warp so now it is pretty straight, and yes, I now realize after doing some actual research that it is not very tanto like. It was more of my attempt at a tanto without really knowing what one was when I had extra time while forging. I quenched it in used motor oil. The handle is mahogany with some lacquer as a finish and a bronze guard. I made the guard too small and didn't have any more bronze to make a new one, so it is a bit off on the spine. All in all, I am happy with how the knife came out, as it was my first ever hidden tang and guard, but I definitely need to work on my fit and finish. (It is a bit blotchy because I was messing around with it a bit by the wood pile. No breaks or bends!)
  9. My 3rd? Knife WIP

    So I've been doing blacksmithing for over a year and now I've decided I wanted to try some knives this summer. This is my 3rd or so forged knife (I did some stock removal as well previously) and I wanted to try to make a more traditional tanto. It is forged out of a coil spring and after hardening, it passed the file test, so I'm happy with it. Unfortunately, it took on a bit of a warp but it looks like I can grind it out. Please critique as much as you can, I know I need it. ````
  10. They can't all be perfect

    I'm not an expert here but I've heard that 5160 is tricky to forge weld with due to the chromium content. I would try leaving it out next time, because I know 1090 and 15n20 are common in Damascus
  11. Forging Diagrams needed

    Yea the actual forging in the bench was not much. But the project was year long, so I spent the entire year trying to learn the ABANA skills I talked about above.
  12. Forging Diagrams needed

    It actually was not a capstone. My high school has a yearlong project that they make every senior do so I did mine on blacksmithing. And yes, I did get quite a bit of tooling from the school for the bench. They ended up buying me a welder, 210 pounds of coal and the materials, as well as some other odds and ends.
  13. Forging Diagrams needed

    Thank You! I forgot those existed. They will be perfect.
  14. Hi everyone. I've been blacksmithing for a while now and I'm about to go give a presentation for school on my progress through the year. I was wondering if anyone could point me to a good place to find some diagrams demonstrating forging techniques. I'm in a bit of a time crunch right now so I can't look as deeply as I'd like to but I'm having trouble finding them. I'm trying to find diagrams or pictures demonstrating the journeyman skills located here: https://abana.org/resources/journeyman/index.shtml#skills And if anyone is curious, the project was trying to learn as many of those journeyman skills I could and makes smaller pieces demonstrating each. The final project was making a bench which I donated to the school, pictured below.
  15. Carving Letters in Steel.

    Bart next time I will try that. I could not seem to get a good transfer when I was using it, but I think it was because I was using too high quality of photo paper. By it I mean the iron method