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OK, so Stanley is finished. I call him Stanley because he has a Stanley spanner piece attached to each side. Pics start from the basic form onto which the pieces were added, welding from the back where possible. The thing is pretty heavy - only guessing but a 200lb spring scale bottomed out with just his front feet off the ground. I would estimate about 400 lb maybe. And 3.2 metres nose to tail. He is in better proportion than some of the pics would indicate. I finished up cutting and shutting the tail section to lose about 300mm there to maintain proportion. Anyway, here's the project … last pic shows approval by the family dog.

croc1 bones.JPG

croc2 head.JPG

croc3 side start.JPG

croc5 swinging.JPG

croc6 legs on.JPG

croc7 foot detail.JPG

croc8 side detail1.JPG

croc9 side detail2.JPG

croc10 stanley.JPG

croc11 finished.JPG

croc12 dog approved.JPG

croc4 sides done.JPG

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Outstanding. I hope someone gets him that knows how much work went into him. 

Pnut (Mike)

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This one won't be for sale, Mike. I'll exhibit him at our local show in July and then find a home for him with last year's scorpion at my workplace for tourists to look at.

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Cool, he'd make a great central piece for a collection or display. I'm sure your visitors will be impressed. I know I am.

Pnut (Mike)

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Very nice. One could spend hours just looking at all the cool and interesting pieces you made him  from. 

 

Nice looking dog too. 

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If I can find a cheap wire feed or stick welder I may try to put together some scrap art. My welding skills are nearly non existent but I think it would be a good way to build my skills since it's all non critical welding. I've been reading a couple books over the last couple weeks I borrowed from the library and seeing your croc sealed the deal.

Pnut (Mike) 

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Ausfire,

Great job, I am envious of your imagination.

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Aus, That is a really impressive croc. Wow. I think I'll be looking at it more throughout the day since there's a lot in there.

The open end wrenches and chain worked out excellent for the back scales. The legs look perfectly shaped and I love the toes. The teeth are just wicked haha.are the jaws control arms from vehicle suspension?

I'm surprized the pup is near it at all. :) Amazing work! 

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Stanley's a work of art, Aus!  The graceful curve of his tail makes him look alive.

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Gobsmacked, Ausfire.  Bet you get a lot of offers to buy it at the local show in July.  That's really an outstanding piece of artwork.

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Now to shove a recorder down it's throat to make appropriate sounds when folks get close; be sure to have some "oil dry" handy for floor clean ups!

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Aus: I think your dog's expression says she'd rather not be laying quite so close under Stanley, the horses look a little light for the job.

Stanley's another Ausome sculpture I can't wait to see him on display.

Frosty The Lucky.

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6 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

Now to shove a recorder down it's throat

A tick ticking clock perhaps? Captain hook beware. 

May be too late. I believe I saw a hook in its belly.

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Ha Ha. Thank you for the comments. I would have liked a photo of him in a natural setting, near a creek or emerging from a swamp with a wallaby in his mouth, but as you can see, moving this thing poses problems.

Yes, Das, the jaws are suspension control arms from a Holden.

I have tried to keep the scrap pieces recognisable as much as possible, as it makes it interesting to look over it and identify the parts. I like things with writing on them - the rail clips on the front  feet for example (BHP steel Made in Australia) and the old spanner with For Water Pump  Nuts Only cast on the handle. Also found an old cast plate off an offset printing machine with the London address on it. Things like that add to the unique nature of the piece.

The chains made a good knobbly back, but as Das will know, welding chain is a real pain. Often you don't get a good earth between links.

Our mechanic at work said I should have put red bulbs for the eyes.

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A ticking clock---great idea! (And easier to implement!) I used to have an old wind up travel clock that had a tick that could be heard through a wall or two

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Mr. Ausfire,

Great job.

What do you feed your creation?

Clinker?

Keep 'em coming.

SLAG.

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Aus, what are you going to coat this beast with? 

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If I came upon Stanley in low light, I would be looking for a tree to climb. Crocks are pretty cantankerous and aggressive. I spent many an hour in the Florida Everglades as a young man hunting & fishing and always gave them a wide berth. Stanley borders on magnificent.

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Das, I have given the finish some thought. At the moment it is just wire-cupped brushed, with some of the highlight areas buffed. I'm thinking a coat of Rustmasters, maybe sprayed on to get into all the uneven surfaces and textures. I could use a couple of spray cans of Rust-o-leum, but it doesn't seem to apply as thickly as the other stuff, and doesn't do as well outdoors. So I will probably go with the heavier Rustmasters. I would like to keep the shine in the ball bearing eyes though. Coating them dulls the shine.

I'll post another pic when he's coated, and perhaps in another pose rather than on saw horses.

And Irondragon, in a real croc situation I would be with you up that tree. In recent years, the ban on croc hunting here has led to a great increase in numbers and size of crocs. No one wants to swim in our northern coastal rivers and beaches any more, and for good reason. Australia is well known for all our dangerous animals, but there are really only two that will go out of their way to hunt you down and kill you … sharks and crocodiles. Easy solution … just stay out of the water.

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You could mask off the eyes for the main clearcoat and possibly brush on an epoxy resin after. I would test it on another bearing first. I know exactly what you mean on it darkening up. I haven't tried other solutions yet but that's one I have thought of. Or just go with a glow in the dark paint for the eyes lol.

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Maybe attach sacrificial zinc anodes on the bottoms of the feet to help prevent corrosion? Waxing the eye bearings might help too. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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You might want to check out a product called Ballistol. Designed by the Germans for use on firearms. I have found it works very well on forged steel and protecting equipment (anvils & vises). It dries clear and dosen't effect the patina at all but protects it against moisture & rusting.

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Wow. That is an amazing piece of art. Have you thought about the spray on truck liner? It might cover up some of the intricacies of your amazing work, but it would add the right texture for the skin

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Thanks for suggestions.

Shabumi, I think the truck liner might be a bit gooey … it's the intricacies of the work you really want to keep.

Waxing or masking the eyes could work well.

Irondragon, I researched Ballistol and found it is available in Australia (even close by in Cairns). It's advertised mainly as a lubricant and to protect gun metal, so it may be a good choice. Perhaps I'll get some and try it out. I have a few rifle barrels that could do with some treatment anyway. At $50 for a spray can it isn't cheap, but after all the hours I've put into that croc, I want it to have a good finish. Thanks.

 

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Now to have it lunge out of a local pond as folks go by----think of the cash you could make selling clean underwear!  Of course it might be hard on your teeth and facial features...

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