JHCC

Two deaths

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Please say a prayer for Edmundo (my brother’s father-in-Law) and James (my old Greek professor) who both died today. Thank you.  

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Friends and family are on the list.

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Marg and I have prayed for both of them.

May they rest in God's presence and precinct.

John,  you have our sympathy and empathy.

SLAG.

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Prayers sent John. Peace be with all.

Frosty The Lucky.

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@Frosty, I think you will particularly enjoy the penultimate paragraph of the official notice from the Classics Department on Jim's death:

Quote

It is with a terrible sadness that the Oberlin Classics Department must announce the sudden and unexpected passing of Jim Helm, professor emeritus, mentor, teacher, and friend. Jim and his wife Anne were traveling this past week, and Jim apparently died suddenly and unexpectedly. Details on a memorial service are not yet complete, but Anne has indicated that it will not take place right away. We will keep you posted as news develops.

Jim was a humble, kind, and principled man with a sly sense of humor and a fondness for terrible puns. He will be remembered for many accomplishments, virtues, and characteristics; I offer a few here. Jim was a good and great teacher, particularly of the Greek language; generations of students first read Plato's *Apology* with Jim, and generations more are still reading the *Apology* from Jim's deeply learned student commentary. I am teaching from it now, and I learn from Jim on every page.

It was Jim who started Oberlin's "Bardic Reading" in 1993, a nearly-yearly event in which students of Oberlin Classics read aloud a long work of classical literature (most traditionally, the *Iliad*, *Odyssey* or *Aeneid*; less traditionally, the extant works of Aristophanes, or [once!] Lucan's *de bello civili*). In the early years of the event, Jim would stage it on Sunday in the 'Sco; Jim always stayed until the end, would help wrap things up at 3 or 4 am Monday, and then appear, alert and apparently refreshed for his 9:00 am class -- much to the amazement of his dazed and exhausted students.

Jim retired, characteristically, at the age of 65, not because he was done teaching, but because he felt that he should make room in a crowded field for a younger scholar. Jim always did the right thing, simply and quietly, with principle but without demonstration, no matter the cost to himself.

As will all of us, I will miss Jim a great deal. Perhaps most of all, I will miss the sly grin he used to show when he had a really terrible pun to spring on the unsuspecting. His delight in these moments was always infectious, and it is that fleeting moment of sheer enjoyment - just before the pun - that stays with me today.

Our deepest condolences to Anne, Jim's surviving son Bennet, and all of their family members.

 

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I am reminded how often I tell the story of how easily he could be distracted into endless discussions of the minutiae of Greek grammar -- which was especially useful if you hadn't done that day's translation.

Of course, what little I actually remember of Ancient Greek grammar is dominated by the information he shared in those extensive tangents. He may well have been wiser than I knew.

5 minutes ago, Cannon Cocker said:

a man who's type

"whose"

;) 

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