Charles R. Stevens

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Everything posted by Charles R. Stevens

  1. Charles R. Stevens

    Best coating for wood handles

    For a working knife, mineral or vedgtable oil work good. For somthing fancier thinned epoxy, my self I use spar varnish as I tend to partially wrap working knives with cordage.
  2. Charles R. Stevens

    Noob with first charcoal forge

    If you are leaving th the tuyere were it is, don’t rotate the “V”, instead raise the sides and put the stock 90 degrees to the tuyere. The fire pot is essentially a 7” square cut on the diagonal for the flat sides with two 6”x7” peices forming the sloping sides. In your set up turn the brick the other way and pile up bricks on each flat end. This gives you a 4”x 13” trench. The tuyere coming in under a 4” brick would be about righ, with a level of brick higher on the flat ends.
  3. Charles R. Stevens

    What did you do in the shop today?

    I have bricks in the table to trap fuel (meted the one in the tuyere side). as to lowerd anvil, as I am not working shoes all the time in it, yes
  4. Charles R. Stevens

    What did you do in the shop today?

    The pot is set up for both coal and charcoal. Unlike bottom blast forges side blast forges with 3/4-1” tuyere burn either fuel equally well. I rarely carry a “real anvil” on the truck, having a track head welded on a piece of 2” shafting that handles 90% of what one needs an anvil for.
  5. Charles R. Stevens

    Noob with first charcoal forge

    my I wouldn’t put it from the slope. Myself I would drill a hole on the hing side and make the back and from to of the grill the flat sides and slope the long way in the grill. This gives you a slightly longer landing to hold stock. And buy the way, thanks for your service “this I will defend”
  6. Charles R. Stevens

    Multiple tuyeres

    Your forge is a thing of beauty, Steve
  7. Charles R. Stevens

    Multiple tuyeres

    I wish I had a picture of Steve’s set up. It is a bottom blast but his long fire adapter is great
  8. Charles R. Stevens

    Mounting post vise to forge

    Your set up might not be ideal for anything other than a small machinists vice, but on forges with big tables postvices mounted to one end works great. With your 4 wheel set up and small table it will be aufly close to your fire and you will have to place a block under the vice. Now the last cavalry forge issued buy the US army acualy had a small machinests vise that sat on one corner and a small anvil on the other.
  9. Charles R. Stevens

    Noob with first charcoal forge

    If you stack up bricks on the tuyere and opposite side to make the walls to your trench you will have a deeper fire, with more fuel on top. Charcoal with the double action pump I use on my demo forge works well with shallow fires, but with more air, a bigger and deeper fire works better.
  10. Charles R. Stevens

    Noob with first charcoal forge

    Your set up is fine, it just looks funny to us old coots because of the vagarities of putting it in a gas BQ. Flat wall for the tue works good, angled sides for the long ends of the trench aid in clean out and encoding the fuel to settle. The funky thing for us is we would usually set up to put the steel perpendicular to the tue. This is a side blast fire pot I built for my new forge, and the orientation for use. Here is the tuyere and air supply Do you see why it looks funky to Jerry?
  11. Charles R. Stevens

    Multiple tuyeres

    99% or more you just need one tuyere, for those get times you need more a temp set up sets you in business.
  12. Charles R. Stevens

    T-Stakes for Tongs? Maybe?

    I use the toung of the nearest trailer
  13. Charles R. Stevens

    Multiple tuyeres

    If you want the tuyere to live longer, come in from the side
  14. Charles R. Stevens

    Starting a forge

    Ok, so charcoal likes sideblast forges and coal didn’t care, so I would recomend a side blast. That said, I would recomend cutting a one inch notch in each side, say 3-4” wide on looser sides (the side you plan to work from and the opposite side. Now measure down from the bottom of the notch and cut or drill a hole 3 1/2” in center from the left side to exept a 3/4” schedual 40 tuyere. for fill adobe is ideal (30% clay and 30-70% sand is ideal but just about any subsoil will work. I recomend placing a brick in the bottom so it sets 1” below the tuyere. This simply keeps you from digging to deep when your cleaning out the fire. Not nessisary but helpful. So from this point we play wit mud patties. Slide your tuyere in (you may wrap paper around it so the mud dosnt grab it) set the end of the tuyere about 2 or 3 inches from the center and slopes down about 5 deg. From here build up the mud so you are an inch below the rim and at the bottom of the side notches (this let’s you keep coal on the top of the hearth). You want to form a trench, state sided on the side the tuyere comes in from and the opposite side, wile sloping the other two sides about 45 deg. So you have a 4-6” wide slot about 11” long. at this point you can either use a couple of bricks on top of the hearth to coral the fuel (you want fuel piled up on top of the fire). Opttinaly you can use mud to build up side walls.
  15. Charles R. Stevens

    What did you do in the shop today?

    I lowered it from wrist to fist high. That is 32 from 34”. This gives me first knuckle when wearing my riding boots. i bent the racks with the vise and heated it wit the forge. It’s a fuel hog compared to my JABOD experiments but it taught me what I needed to know to build a side blast fire pot. 6x11”, 3 1/2” to the top of the tuyere and 6” deep over all. 7/8” ID (3/4” schedule 40 pipe) tueyer. The 70# anvil is easer to tote around than the 120# one.
  16. Charles R. Stevens

    Multiple tuyeres

    That is pretty classic for sword heat treating forges.
  17. Charles R. Stevens

    Starting a forge

    I apologize, when you do this a wile, some things just become so common you don’t think about it. In this case it is the fact that the stock lays on the hearth and the center of the fire is at hearth level.
  18. Charles R. Stevens

    What did you do in the shop today?

    Rebuilt my portable anvil stand. Lowered it two inches (buy replacing the block with one rabeted to fit lower) changed the tool loops for racks and rebuilt the clamps
  19. Charles R. Stevens

    Starting a forge

    This is why I set back and look at it. I tend to over complicate things.
  20. Charles R. Stevens

    Noob with first charcoal forge

    Hair driers are way to much air. Set it in a stool and just aim it at the pipe. the JAPOB forge might be worth looking at for inspiration. Not you can melt fire brick...
  21. Charles R. Stevens

    A cool shop setup

    Look at some of his other vidioes. Simple treadle hammer using many of his standard tools and a nifty as all get out clamp (a steel strake clamp) for holding axe and top tool blanks. His grinder is nice to. Bicycle rolled abrasive and double sided carpet tape...
  22. Charles R. Stevens

    Starting a forge

    So tell me your prefers fuel, coal or charcoal. Or both? Give me an idea of your tool access and skill level. Then we will get down to it
  23. Charles R. Stevens

    Starting a forge

    If you like I can give you step buy step instructions on how to build ither a bottom or side blast forge from your set up. Some times when we first start out it’s hard to wrap your head around what is for us experienced pyromaniacs are simple concepts. Besides TP and the gang haven’t had a chance to herandpg me in a wile.
  24. Charles R. Stevens

    Starting a forge

    The style your showing works ok for coal as fire spread isn’t an isue, not so good for charcoal as you will waste fuel. For charcoal bring the mud all the way even with the rim and scoop out a bowl or trench. go to the forges section and look at the pended posts, their is a treatise on side blast forges with illustrations. And some pictures posted. The drawings are on a 1” to one square scale.