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Student doing a project needs questions answered


peggieweg

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HI there im a second year welding student and my teacher is having me go out and ask blacksmiths some questions.

1. Whats your name and where are you from?

2. How did you become a Blacksmith?

3. What do you like most about your job?

4. What do you dislike about your job?

5. What do you do on a day to day basis at work?

6. Do you have any welding background?

7. What advice would you give to a beginner welder?

thank you!

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1. Whats your name and where are you from?  See name to the left of screen ..... from my mom

2. How did you become a Blacksmith?  took a course

3. What do you like most about your job?  hobby, not a job, ..... I like that people don't spit on me any more

4. What do you dislike about your job?  retired from counseling in a mental health clinic.  I really disliked it when people spit on me

5. What do you do on a day to day basis at work?  retired  ..... blacksmithing is mostly about working hot iron in its plastic form, and not focused on welding

6. Do you have any welding background?  took a course in arc/gas/mig welding and two courses that involved forge-welding

7. What advice would you give to a beginner welder?  take a course .... and if you want to do blacksmithing then to take some courses in blacksmithing

 

Is your teacher confused about whether blacksmithing is about forging hot metal in its plastic state,..... versus a focus on modern welding careers?

 

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Charles Stevens

Bradley Ok USA

I have tinkered with steel since junior high (old hibachi and a hair dryer) dad taught me to gas and stick weld. I became a farrier 15 years ago because I didn’t like the way my horses were treated. Vets found out I was good with young, wild and hurt horses. Smithing grew from fabricating and shoe shaping.

i love horses, and creating somthing with my hands.

people

i trim hooves, shape shoes and nail them on (try hitting a moving target wit a small hammer) I also train driving horses and forge dohickies and build driving equipment. 

As mentioned befor my dad taught me, and I have done a bit of fabrication over the years. From gas welding exhaust systems to building flatbeds, trailers and carts. 

Get as much training, experience and certifications as you can, learn to read blueprints and learn to fabricate (learn to bend and weld up a tool box to spec, remember that curves and stock thickness will trip you up) lots of welders out there, few true fabricators. Build a welding trailer, you can always find side work between good jobs. Forging will improve your fabrications skills, and a forge heats steel cheaper than a rose bud. Your forge and anvil will get used a lot!

 Your welcome

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Your going to have to refine your questions a little. Are you wanting to ask full time blacksmiths? Because most people here are hobbiests and have day jobs. I work in a body shop painting cars and pretend I'm a blacksmith on weekends. I like making the cars look beautiful but hate being around the chemicals involved in the process. So you will have to define questions 3 4 and 5.

1....see screen name. From northern minnesota. , now in Minneapolis.

2. Always interested in the metal arts but really got into the addiction when I got my granddads anvil and forge after he passed. 

Put your general location in your profile page. There might be some of us in your area.

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6 hours ago, peggieweg said:

my teacher is having me go out and ask blacksmiths some questions.

What advice would you give to a beginner welder?

Add your location to your profile. Then look up a blacksmithing group or organization in your area and go to the meetings. You will learn more in a day than you can ever imagine. 

Learn the dangers of welding and how to either avoid them or at least how to make them less dangerous. Welding fumes contain all kinds of nasty things, and many of those things are accumulative. Multiply 2000 hours (one year) of breathing just a little of the fumes, either your welding fumes or the fumes from the other welding stations in the building, times 20 years and you get 40,000 times the exposure. 

Grinding and cutting are a part of welding, Take a damp cloth and wipe the inside of your welding hood. That is what your breathing. Take a damp cloth and wipe the welding table. That is the amount of stuff in your work area. Wipe down your clothes, your hair, your lunch table, dash board of your car,  etc. That is the stuff in your environment. Wipe the floor. That is the stuff you stir up just walking around the shop and put back into the air. You then breathe that junk. There is NOT a pill that will remove that stuff from your lungs, They do make a portable oxygen bottle that you can carry with you at all times so when you can no longer work, it will provide you just enough oxygen so you can still breathe and stay alive.

Welding or arc flash is another hazard. Yes, you have the latest and greatest welding lens. Even one arc flash an hour is 2000 arc flashes in a year and 40,000 arc flashes in 20 years. It is NOT just the welding lens that lets the arc flash get to the eyes. It is also the reflection of the flash that came around your head and got inside the hood.  Close your eyes and slowly count to 15. With your eyes still closed, tell me what you see. Protect your eyes and your eye sight as you only get one pair of eyes to last a lifetime, YOUR lifetime.

Are you a good enough of a welder that you are willing to bet the soundness of your weld against the life of one person or the lives of many people. One fellow I spoke to related the story of welding lifting ears (rings) to a piece of heavy steel plate that was being used in the construction of a building. He did a full penetration weld even though the foreman wanted only a tack weld just strong enough to lift the plate. Imagine his surprise when he saw THAT plate being used as an elevator to lift a piece of heavy equipment (and load) up to the construction floor of the building. Is YOUR weld strong enough to be used outside the intended use you were told about?  Is it strong enough EVERY time you make the weld? 

Before you finally decide on any profession, sit down and talk with several of the old guys that no longer work at that profession. Do not talk for 15 minutes, but spend a day with them, living in their world. See what their profession has provided them both at the time, and left them to deal with after the job is over.  Ask the old folks why they got out of that profession and changed to a different job or profession. It can be an eye opener.

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Peggieweg,  posting a complaint because someone hurt your feelings with their answer is not going to make anyone want to help you further.

>/engage curmudgeon mode

This is our porch you walked onto asking for help, then you bark at us making demands on how we choose to help you?   who do you think you are to decide one of these members are not qualified to help you?  I for one refuse to help people with your pompus attitude.  No one was being mean,  We are the big dogs here not you, and if you cant at least try to be polite then I suggest you pretend to get a new attitude.

>/disengage curmudgeon mode

We are very protective of our members here,  we welcome new members as long as they behave themselves.  If this posts is too hard to deal with I suggest you  forget welding,   hot metal is even less forgiving

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We actually care about new (and young) members. Let’s take Steve for an example (he gets bashed a lot by tools and entitled twerps for telling them how the runner met the road). He is a union master electrician and a sword smith making museum quality blades. He also is a dyslexic. He just invested $20 of his time in you. He told you what you needed to here and not wanted to here. 

I don’t know what you posted complaint was, the moderators are good about taking down childish tirades and trolls hate posts, but Steve is willing to give you a mulligan, so am I. Stick around we have certified special purpose welding instructors as members, as well as folks that can forge weld some crazy stuff. 

 

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To turn this a bit upside down; I often suggest to people who want a career as a blacksmith to get certified as a welder as it's generally a more stable career and there is often a lot of overlap.

However I also say that you can often tell blacksmiths who came into the craft from welding by how they treat the material. Welder derived smiths tend to treat steel like a carpenter treats wood: a rigid material. You fasten it together, you cut it to size and you can glue it but generally don't.    Coming into the craft from several other crafts or paths smiths may treat steel more like a potter treats clay---you smoosh it here, change the cross section there, and generally use it as a plastic medium rather than a rigid one.  (another analogy would be Welding smiths tend more toward art deco and other path smiths towards art nouveau )

Of course people often change as they learn how steel works when hot...

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IForgeIron has over 43,000 members and is visited by over 150 world wide countries each month. I have personally spoken with several certified welders about their welding skill, expertise, experience and craft. Some of the most impressive comments are mentioned here.

One fellow was welding at night in a combat zone and drawing the attention and fire from the enemy while welding. Bullets were hitting the equipment he was welding on.

A fellow was welding metal plates together and had to wear fire proof clothing as the welding generated so much heat. The metal plates were V'ed out and he had to fill in the V to X-ray quality. The plates were 6 feet (72 inches) thick.

Several have mentioned the standard welding rod for them was 3 feet (36 inches) long.

Many folks that use fire to weld (forge weld) metal together. Theramite welding is use to weld RR track together.

And there is the group that use explosives to make the weld during the explosion.

There are also instructors that teach welding on the site. 

 

The point is the information is available, and yes they are very qualified, through many different certifications.

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Good Morning and Merry Almost, Peggie.

Is this part of your 'Work Experience' for your program? or Is your teacher trying to ask you to figure something out on your own. I think you took the easy way out to try to answer multiple questions. You are not learning from what Blacksmith's are telling you because you aren't asking them in person. Conversation on a keyboard does not teach you the part of the conversation that requires where the emphasis is on the story. I'm sorry for you. Please do some leg work and talk to real people, not a keyboard. That is the lazy way to answer your questions, or your Teachers questions.

We had a Blacksmith Conference in a Welding Class/Shop University, this July. I was surprised at the number of students that showed an interest in what we were doing, in their Shop. I can count the interested students with 2 fingers. They had a chance to learn what can't be taught in a book and didn't lift their helmets to find out what the funny people where doing. Their loss!! Real sad, I think.

Good Luck learning!! Learning never takes a time-out. Even when you are an Ol' Goat!!

Neil

 

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On 12/20/2017 at 3:15 PM, peggieweg said:

HI there im a second year welding student and my teacher is having me go out and ask blacksmiths some questions.

If you edit your profile to show your location, you may be surprised how many members (blacksmiths & welders) are within visiting distance to you and would answer your questions in person.

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Peggieweg: If you can pull your attitude out of your exhaust port and hold a real conversation with us we'll be more than happy to help. The real world doesn't care spit for your feelings no matter what you think or have been told. I have trouble believing a second year welding student didn't learn that the beginning of your last class. OR have you been looking at youtube videos and playing with a wire feed for a while and THINK you're learning to weld?

No matter, we can help IF you can take being talked to like an adult. I hope to see you're return and willingness to listen. However when I was in school metal shop classes and later trade schools I used to talk about blacksmithing till I realized FINALLY that when an instructor sent me off on an errand like yours he was getting me out of his hair so he could do his job.

Frosty The Lucky.

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On 21/12/2017 at 8:15 AM, peggieweg said:

HI there im a second year welding student and my teacher is having me go out and ask blacksmiths some questions.

1. Whats your name and where are you from?

2. How did you become a Blacksmith?

3. What do you like most about your job?

4. What do you dislike about your job?

5. What do you do on a day to day basis at work?

6. Do you have any welding background?

7. What advice would you give to a beginner welder?

thank you!

1) Marc and I live in Australia

2) It was my first job at age 15, working in my father's smithy

3) making something that is utilitarian and decorative at the same time is extremely satisfying.

4) the heat in summer

5) I make, railings, gates, lamps bed heads etc 

6) I can stick and mig weld ... just. Couldn't make a living welding though, not without serious training. 

7) i am not sure why you would ask a blacksmith about welding. Blacksmith usually stink at welding and some even think that being a bad welder is proof of their blacksmith skills (I know, funny but true). Since I do more metal fabrication than blacksmithing I need welding skills and always think in doing a course but keep putting it off. 

So I would love to be in your course learning welding, but would probably hate working as a welder in a factory or on the road welding pipes. So perhaps I would say something on the lines of ... learn to weld but keep an eye out for other opportunities to set up an independent workshop, fabrication, repairs, blacksmithing? :)

You are welcome.

That was not so hard.

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      OK, I'm willing to forgive the young fellow for his indiscretion. I'll answer his questions, but I'm not sure of the relevance to welding.

 

On ‎21‎/‎12‎/‎2017 at 7:15 AM, peggieweg said:

HI there im a second year welding student and my teacher is having me go out and ask blacksmiths some questions.

1. Whats your name and where are you from? Darryl, and I am Australian.

2. How did you become a Blacksmith? Started making junk sculpture out of scrap metal and the forge was handy to bend steel into the shapes I wanted. Progressed to basic blacksmithing and about ten years ago a job came up at a local historic village where I am now the curator. Doing daily blacksmith demos for tourists became part of the job.

3. What do you like most about your job? Meeting with people from all over the world who have an interest in blacksmithing. Making things that are functional and decorative from scrap steel or plain bar.

4. What do you dislike about your job? Getting burnt. Safety is really important when demoing in a public space.  Extra care needed. It's also a bit tough coping with heat from a forge at this time of year.

5. What do you do on a day to day basis at work? Mainly make small items for the tourist trade - bottle openers. pot lifters, ram heads and bull heads, hooks, handles, all that sort of stuff. Junk sculpture when I have time.

6. Do you have any welding background? No. I can weld with stick and MIG, but often by trial and error. No-one has ever shown me how.

7. What advice would you give to a beginner welder? I am a school teacher. If you want advice on using apostrophes (see your first question), I'm your man. But I cannot offer you any advice on welding. In fact, I could use some of that advice myself, especially forge welding which has always been hit and miss for me.

thank you!

No worries. Good luck with your assignment. However, as others have stated, you would be best advised to find a blacksmith (or welder?) in your area to answer your questions personally.

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