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Hey Guys,

this is my Anvil stand!
Greetings from Germany.

Florian, I really like the simplicity and functional side of your stand, what are the straps that hold the anvil down tied to ?
Naz
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10 4x4s all timber screwed together ( center hollow.) A couple of aluminum mounting plates from my work and a few more timber screws and.....
Anvil1.jpg

Works well, and still light enough that I can "walk it" out of the way of the garden tractor

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Florian, I really like the simplicity and functional side of your stand, what are the straps that hold the anvil down tied to ?
Naz


Hi,
In the barrel is a large piece of wood. I think there is more Woot then sand ;)
And in this piece of wood is the anvil bolted.
This is necessary because the anvil would fall over if you try to drive with the barrel around. :D
Sorry for my English.

Greetings
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  • 2 weeks later...

I picked up a Hay Budden anvil about a month ago and wanted to build a stand for it. Thanks to all the stands pictured on this forum I was able to get some design help and combine that with some metal from the metal pile and here is what I came up with.

post-19223-0-50840400-1304004017_thumb.j

post-19223-0-62899200-1304004028_thumb.j

post-19223-0-74152800-1304004045_thumb.j

post-19223-0-01215000-1304004055_thumb.j

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Avadon: I had a local metal fabricator build me a stand for little old 120-pound Trenton based on your design. I am LOVING IT! Thanks for sharing your photos and philosophy.


Awesome! I hope you remember to send in your royalty check for my patent. lol Just Kidding! :P Actually the idea is not mine as much as it was a mixture of Hofi, Brian Brazeal, Thomas Powers, etc. etc. and I just took their idea and ran with it. So we really have these pro's to thank for the design. I picked their brains till the point I think they probably wanted to go to bed early. hehe But the end result is an extremely well constructed stand and very SAFE! Those gussets and corner pieces really increase strength but also increase safety. After all, none of us know if and when a weld will fail. Impurities, lack of penetration, stress, etc. can all cause a weld to fail and I'd bet none of us are are sending our welds out to be x-rayed, so those extra bits of bracing could be the difference of having an anvil in your lap and at these weights having the stand and anvil on your foot or you under it is just in unacceptable proposition. Glad you got some good use out of the design. Did you put the sand in it too? I'm still loving the design myself and haven't yet found anything to profound lacking. I sort of wished I would have cut holes in the plate for the hardy and pritchel, but even if I did anything dropped through would hit metal stand and the idea of trying to machine the stand portions to let things all the way through just seemed more work than necessary. I can still get most small pieces through hardy/pritchel holes.
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Here's my old Trenton on my new Avadon Forge clone:

post-8862-0-97741700-1301148799_thumb.jp


LOOKS EXCELLENT! Yep that is exactly the design. I bet it functions extremely well and is seriously rigid. Looks like you even put a prying bolt underneath? That is a really handy feature. You'll see that all the little details really pay off when you add them all to one stand like this. How is the ring on it? And what is your total weight now? Now all you need is throw some hard rubber under those feet and bolt it to the concrete and you'll have perfection. Hope the design works very well for you. :D
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Guess I need to add my anvil stand to the list. Made from a fork lift tine, it's adjustable for height with the 3 screw jacks and on wheels for ease of moving around the shop.

UsedAnvilStand1.JPG



Holy macrole.. that may just be one of the scariest stands i've ever seen. (insert: worried scared face). You sure that thing isn't going to dump over on someone's foot? :unsure:
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  • 1 month later...

I have only used stumps, and a light weight box on a tripod in the past as anvil stands, and mostly with under 200 pound London pattern anvils. Inquiring minds want to know, especially before they butcher a one inch thick drop and lose half the mass that they paid for. So....

Dragging this one back up to ask some questions about the wide boat shape versus narrow profile base plates, for those who have used or own the Hofi/Euroanvil/Tom Clark/Rathole type anvil and specialized stands.

(1) How often do you actually use the pass-thru holes in the base plate under the hardy and pritchel for upsetting long bars, etc? Would a plate on the ground beside the anvil and holding the stock against the base not do just as well as passing it thru?

(2)The Avadon type stand with the longitudinal square tube looks like it would be in the way of the pass thru, unless you beefed it up as an intermediate height upsetting block. But that style seems to lack the holes in the base plate.

(3) Do you really need to cut out the crescent between the feet on the near side to get *that* close to the anvil for some things? Or is that small shelf space more useful to hold your punch lube/chisel rack/spit can? :blink:

(4) Is a triangular expanded metal catch tray under the baseplate really in the way unless you are crowding the anvil to work on the shelf on the far side?

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I have only used stumps, and a light weight box on a tripod in the past as anvil stands, and mostly with under 200 pound London pattern anvils. Inquiring minds want to know, especially before they butcher a one inch thick drop and lose half the mass that they paid for. So....

(3) Do you really need to cut out the crescent between the feet on the near side to get *that* close to the anvil for some things? Or is that small shelf space more useful to hold your punch lube/chisel rack/spit can? :blink:



My stands with the crescents cut out are used on my larger anvils (280, 450 pounders). I did this for a couple of reasons:
1) Since they are larger anvils, I sometimes have to reach farther to work the stock over the horn. In this situation, I like to get very close to the anvil. The crescents cut out allow that.
2) The steel was cut and given to me for free.

My smaller anvils are siliconed onto stands with square plates.
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My main anvil (pictured) sits on a piece of Rock Maple 12" x 16" x 7' tall, buried to a working height. The angle iron hold downs allow for adding blocks of wood under the anvil for taller smiths or if the post settles. In 20 years it hasn't.

post-17465-0-10558900-1309521109_thumb.j

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Guess I need to add my anvil stand to the list. Made from a fork lift tine, it's adjustable for height with the 3 screw jacks and on wheels for ease of moving around the shop.

UsedAnvilStand1.JPG


Is your anvil home made? Dose not look quite like a factory anvil.
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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

It's hard to beat a simple stump.

With a fabricated base, I'm sure the additional weight of materials helps to stabilize things, ... but I like to be able to move and turn the Anvil around.

A Gum ( or Elm ) stump is my first choice, ( because they won't split ) with the Anvil routed into the top, about an inch deep, ... and a shallow, concave recess on the bottom.

This simple stand sits very solid, ... but can be moved about, as needed.


.

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