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I was looking about and seeing how people set up their anvil, and there are several threads, but not a whole lot of different setups pictured. I thought a thread for showing some pics would help everybody and give a chance to show off ideas.

I decided to use a stump for my "new" 1912 Trenton anvil. It's 168#. The first time I used it I set it on the stump for my old anvil, which was all wrong and did not support this anvil well. It rang like a church bell!

I used Locktite exterior sub-floor adhesive under the anvil and fastened with brackets made from 1x1/4 A36, drilled and hot bent. I should have made the brackets about an inch longer so I could get 2 lags into the stump on each bracket. A straight piece of 1x1/4 A36 is bolted to the brackets with 3/8 bolts.

I now have a rather quiet anvil.

The log is cut square because there was a large knot on one side. If I have to do this again I will order a clean straight log from my firewood supplier. I chainsawed 3 feet into the bottom while I was at it too. This assembly will have to move onto the driveway every time I use it, and it is easy to move with the dolly.

Phil

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pkrankow,

Here is My 100# Peter Wright on it's stump. I spent a lot of time with the belt sander making the wood flat.
This anvil also rang like a bell, but it quieted right down when bolted securely.
I had originally used 1/4" lags, but replaced them with 3/8 last weekend.

If the stump splits I will got to a set-up like yours but so far the angle iron is working well. Now I need to add something to hang tongs and hammers on.
Bill

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Standard stump mount for me - fir round from a tree that went down in the big blow we had here in '96.

Forged 4 horseshoes into spikes and fastened the anvil down with those - added a few hammered in loops for cut-offs. etc .

Nothing fancy but it's been serving me well since '99.

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Total noob here, with a cracked anvil, but here's what I came up with. I'd cut an oak down this spring, took a cut off the bottom for the block, and squared it up. Being more of a chainsaw guy, with leanings to old truck parts, I cut off a 10" piece of leaf spring, and torched holes in the ends, then plunge cut through the middle of the block for the spring, and V notched the block for a loop of chain. I welded 2 bolts to opposite sides of the loop. I wrapped the loop around the anvil base, so the bolts hung down through the spring holes, and I can tighten it down.

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Cross Pein, No belt sander here, so the adhesive. I did not try to even out the chain marks after the anvil sat flat. I wanted to use 3M 5200, but could not get any locally. I will find out how it comes apart eventually... or never :D

Poleframer, That is a unique idea, I haven't seen that before.

Phil

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These anvils that are fastened down securely should work great. As you, I prefer a stump for mounting an anvil. It is particularly good if it can be buried in the ground 3 ft. or more, but that is not always practical. If you would like to look at another way to level and straighten a stump without access to a commercial saw mill check out: http://www.blksmth.com/Anvi_base_preparation.htm

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For historic demonstrations I still use a stump. In my shop and for modern demonstrations, I prefer the metal tripod. The small one shown comes apart for easier transport, however, I do prefer the permanently welded version for everyday use, of which I do have one for one of my 110 pound Continental Pattern anvils. For my 330 Euro, it has a welded version. I do have holes in the floor to drop pins through the feet to keep them from walking, but still easy to move closer to or farther away from work, depending on project needs.

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I made the first stand last summer. I thought having all the tongs and hammers handy would be nice. Not so- they were always in the way. So I cut all that stuff off a while ago. Today I put the posts on for the hardies and wire brush. Now I should have them when I need them and they should be out of the way and not scatted on the floor like they use to be :D

I also turned that cone mandrel on my 10" Logan. If I was a paying client- that mandrel cost me about $600.00... But the experiance was priceless!

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No, not welded. I move it all the time because I'm constantly rearranging my shop as I get more equipment. I welded a set of "keepers" to the stand bent to the shape of the anvil web. Works really well. No problems with it hoping around either.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Here is my main anvil stand, it's about 300 lbs, filled with concrete, to match the 300 lb anvil sitting on top of it, and yet, with a gravel floor, I can shift it around fairly easily. I traded a guy a 140#+ mousehole anvil for the anvil and stand, his wife wantd it out of the garage, and he was not willing to wait for a buyer, once in a while he comes over to work on it, so we are both happy!

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pkrankow,

Here is My 100# Peter Wright on it's stump. I spent a lot of time with the belt sander making the wood flat.
This anvil also rang like a bell, but it quieted right down when bolted securely.
I had originally used 1/4" lags, but replaced them with 3/8 last weekend.

If the stump splits I will got to a set-up like yours but so far the angle iron is working well. Now I need to add something to hang tongs and hammers on.
Bill



Great idea, just getting started in black smithing, Has anyone used a piece of railroad track for a anvil?
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Here's my 248 pound Mouse Hole on an ash stump. It's 30" into the ground, too. I get more work done this way as the hammer is pushing the hot metal not making the anvil and stump vibrate. Each hold down is a different design bent over the anvil feet.

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Great idea, just getting started in black smithing, Has anyone used a piece of railroad track for a anvil?


Lots of people have. I've also used a rock (once). Stand the rail on end and fasten, you only *need* an anvil a little bigger than your hammer. You can also flip a piece of rail around and use different profiles on it as swage forms.
Phil
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Hers is my 167lb Peter Wright. It is mounted on a cherry stump. I leveled the stump then roughted out a 1 1/2 in deep recess for it. I put roofing felt under the anvil and then used chain and 4 lag bolts to hold it down. I added 3 bands around the stump after it started to get some splits. I have sence added tong holders on the top band.

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Lots of people have. I've also used a rock (once). Stand the rail on end and fasten, you only *need* an anvil a little bigger than your hammer. You can also flip a piece of rail around and use different profiles on it as swage forms.
Phil



Thanks for the info. very helpful.
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Cross Pein, No belt sander here, so the adhesive. I did not try to even out the chain marks after the anvil sat flat. I wanted to use 3M 5200, but could not get any locally. I will find out how it comes apart eventually... or never biggrin.gif

Poleframer, That is a unique idea, I haven't seen that before.

Phil


the never get it apart maybe (sub floor adhesive is nasty stuff)
Tom Clark told me that he used silicone to attach his anvils to the stand and to remove you just heat it up and lift the anvil then a couple of good blows with a hammer to the stand and it comes loose I like this tripod desing it follows the shape of the anvil the legs in tight not too much angle one inch plate that the anvil sits on I used 1/4 inch wedge anchors to secure it to concrete slab if any thing moves it will be the earth
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Here are my anvil stands

numba one, a big stump with my main anvil one it.
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Here is my second anvil that I have in my shop, standing on wheels and on a (weird) construction :P. mainly used by my apprentice or while forging together.
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And now my smallest anvil I own, I use this one for demos,standing on a tripod.
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I've made a couple of anvil stands. These are the things I believe are most important

#1. Overall Weight.. The heavier the stand weight the greater your total mass is going to be which means less work.

#2. Bond.. The stronger, tighter, or more joined the stand is to the anvil the more the hammer will see it as one solid mass. You'll have less vibration and less noise. A good silicone caulk or sikaflex is worth it.

After that I recommend getting as thick of metal as you can if your making a metal anvil stand. Use a good 1.5" - 3" thick piece of plate to set your anvil on. The more mass you have there right under the anvil the better. I put mine on a 2" piece of plate and one could even go thicker if one wanted. Also whatever tubing structure you use on your legs get as thick of a wall as you can. You won't regret it. I actually filled my legs and cross support with sand. I can pour it out if I ever needed to. It's not welded in. There are 3 fasteners acting like plugs at the tops of each legs where i poured it in. Like people have said constantly around here the more the anvil+stand is joined to earth the more effective it all will be. Even at 715lb's this gladiator+stand is better when it's anchored to the concrete. So if you can, bolt it down. I also highly recommend cross members on your legs. A failure of one of your welds could be catastrophic and could injure or kill someone. I highly recommend multi-pass welding. Steel anvil stands are one place where overkill is great. So make things beefy, especially with the heavier anvils 200-500lb+ range. See diagrams on the internet if your unfamiliar with laying down several lines of weld in joints. Only weld a metal anvil stand if your an experienced welder and your sure you can get excellent penetration. Pre-heating of thick materials 1/2" or greater is generally necessary and will help raise the material temp for better penetration. I can't recommend enough the use gusset plates around joined areas. Should part of a weld fail somewhere it can allow you to fix or repair the area before a catastrophic failure. It also adds incredible strength and reduces vibration. You see them on civil engineering structures all the time like bridges as well as aircraft framing.

Cheers -Av

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  • 2 weeks later...

This is my block anvil for re-enactment.
The stump is ash - I added the bick, cutting plate, hammer loops and tong rack last summer.
I love this anvil stand.
When I finally mount my main anvil, I'm definitely going to go for another stump.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I just welded this up today for my 280 pound Brooks anvil. It has a 1" top plate, the legs are 2X3 tubing, and the floor-mount plates are 1/2" X 3" bar. I drilled holes in them so if I ever happen to find the perfect spot for the anvil by the forge, I will bolt it to the floor with some Hilti anchors.

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Phil, here is a variant on you anvil mount.
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I like the features of remove-ability for portability, combined with a simple non-damaging but firm clamping system to deaden ring.
Cross pein, i agree, those flats on Peter Wrights must be made for that reversible-but-firm clamping system!
Fe wood, i agree projections around where you work are asking for trouble, businesses i worked in always had some kind of sturdy stool or low table to put things on. They are then out of the way but also at hand to where ever you are working- be it the bench, power hammer, horn or heel of the anvil or another anvil.


My humble conclusions are;
I agree a stump in the ground would be optimal, a loose stump is a compromise for conveniance.
why glue when a clamp will do- someone will want to separate them one day! Maybe yourself to change anvil height...
I've shy-ed away from metal stands 'cos the ringy-est bells are made from metal, not wood, don't you agree? My completely unproven hunch is that timber has the best compromise between shock/ sound absorbtion and inertia.

Any way it doesn't really matter, so long as anvil doesn't fall on you and its not on the floor, eh?
regs
AndrewOC

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I put a couple pictures of the anvil stand I just finished in the gallery. I am going to try and attach them but not sure if I know how. This is a stand Brian Brazeal showed me how to build. It is solid, has racks, it is anchored to the floor, and is a pleasure to hammer on. I did not realize until I got around Brian that even if you are doing light steel work the more stable your anvil is the more work you get out of your hammer. Thanks Brian.

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