Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
PapaDooks

Forge safety advice

14 posts in this topic

So the last few days while working in the shed i've had the young fella from next door in talking to me and helping out since he's on holidays and seems interested in playing in a shed and making things. now i've mainly just been grinding and welding but each step i've been pressing the safety point with him.ie eye protection. hearing protection. decent leather gloves to help reduce cuts n the such but it got me to thinking about safety when forging.

Obviously somethings like wearing decent shoes,nice thick gloves are fairly standard. what i was wondering about was things like eye protection to help IR. hearing protection. if anyone uses any form of mask(i'm pretty big on wearing masks when is a chance of particles in the air after having a lung infection that stole 15% of my lung capacity)

Thought's. idea's theory on the matter ?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my opinion it all depends upon what one is doing.

I do not worry about IR since I practically always cover the fire. My fire is black. That saves heat and is good for the eyes.

I have a silent anvil so I do not worry about ear protection when smithing but I have helmet intended for logging with eye and ear protection that I always use when grinding.

I never wear gloves unless there is a risk of "kickback" when straightening cold stock. Then I use a padded glove on my left hand - of course I use gloves and the usual stuff when stick welding.

I use a leather apron but more for looks really. It never had to save me from anything but dirt.

I have good forced exhaust so there is rarely anything in the air from the forge so I normally do not wear a mask. I do use a filter mask in the wood working shop when sawing dry timber I have much more stuff in the air there than in the blacksmith shop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

papa,

I found that wearing shade 3 safety glasses has really reduced my eye fatigue.  It doesn't seem to be very popular among smiths, maybe because all color rendering is harder with a green tint.  I have more than one tee shirt with lots of little burn holes right where my leather apron stops.  Forge welding sends a lot of hot stuff in all directions.  I think a leather apron is a good way to go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just spent 3 weeks recovering from scale that popped into my eye when I was twisting some small barstock. It got embedded in my iris and had to be removed and then a small area of my eye had to be drilled to remove rust-infused eye tissue. I do not recommend it. It was not pleasant and I'll never go in my shop without eye protection again.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

REALLY good eye protection is top on the list. Shaded glasses are an option mine aren't shaded but I don't stare into the forge. There is't a problem wearing shades it's just a matter of using them ALL THE TIME and adjusting your interpretation of color. Humans are really well adapted to adjusting to what is.

Protect your lungs! Oh yeah!

I only wear gloves if I have to get close to my forge mouth and it's dragon's breath, or weld, torch work, etc. I NEVER wear gloves around machinery that can grab, say a drill press, lathe, etc. if gloves get caught they'll drag you into the machinery quicker than you can do anything but break and bleed.

No synthetic clothes in the hot shop, natural materials only. Just a touch of sot materials, steel cinders, etc on synthetics melts it and sticks it to your hide to deep fry you. Rolling on the floor only presses it against you more tightly so that won't work to put out a clothing fire. Water's only a maybe, most synthetics are pretty water repellant so the blob of boiling polyester stuck to your side isn't going to get cooled off by the wet but any water that does is likely to steam scald you. NO synthetics. Leather is good even if it can get hot. Smooth top boots are good, hot stuff doesn't get stuck in the laces.

No loose clothing. No reason to take more chances of getting tangled in moving machinery or precariously balanced heavy, sharp, HOT stuff than necessary. Button those sleeves and shirts, NO scarves.

Hearing protection is a good idea even if you don't use LOUD tools regularly, you'll adjust in a while so you won't miss the phone, etc. and it's a good habit to get into. 

A safety talk and HARD rules for visitors is a good idea.

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

speaking of safety glasses, i wear glasses all the time for corrective reasons, are there anygood saftey glasses that fit over the top of them that anyone's had luck with? or any prescription safety glasses anyone's had luck wiht?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some spectacle wearers use clear face masks for eye protection that does not interfere with their prescription glasses.

Something often overlooked around hot/flame hazards is clothing material, always wear natural fibre clothing, if anything should happen, those man made fibres can melt and stick to the wearer....very nasty!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My prescription bi-focal glasses are made from a poly-carbonate material that is rated as ballistic with a special coating. I don't remember the manufacture but every time I get a new prescription my eye care center has the record of them. I have had some pretty hard impacts on them over the last 10-15 years both on the range and forge with no damage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

My prescription bi-focal glasses are made from a poly-carbonate material that is rated as ballistic with a special coating. I don't remember the manufacture but every time I get a new prescription my eye care center has the record of them. I have had some prety hard impacts on them over the last 10-15 years both on the range and forge with no damage.

yeah i have good ones too, bought them for mtn biking / snowboarding. But while grinding if i tilt my head too much stuff gets undreneath them just due to the style. so i'm looking for more of a safety style glass for more coverage, not so much against iimpact

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will say that aprons aren't too bad of an option. Last weekend I had my shirt catch fire and burn a hole the size of a softball. Mama wasn't happy!

                                                                                    Littleblacksmith 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

only gets worse.  I have had my wife threaten my health and happiness ifn I was to wear one of my good shirts out to the shop---even just to take a look in the door.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My trifocals are polycarbs with side shields and fit close to my face. They're right off the shelf at my eye doc's. I still wear a face shield when grinding, brushing, etc. and have goggle type safety thingies that fit over them for really dusty work. Saw dust irritates my eyes more than most other dust.

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I forgot about forge welding. Of course an apron is a must - and I wear glasses all the time but not tinted. And I avoid syntetic fabrics.

I do no know what I do wrong :unsure: but I never burn holes in my clothes when smithing. Bonfires are different in that respect

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/12/2017 at 7:17 PM, Frosty said:

My trifocals are polycarbs with side shields and fit close to my face. They're right off the shelf at my eye doc's. I still wear a face shield when grinding, brushing, etc. and have goggle type safety thingies that fit over them for really dusty work. Saw dust irritates my eyes more than most other dust.

Frosty The Lucky.

I have the same issue with sawdust. In fact if i do sanding and am too close i always end up with horrible styes in my eyes the next day

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0