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HY-100


scruffy forge

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I got my hands on a piece of hy-100 steel. I know nothing about this type of metal. It is 3/4in thick by 1ft wide and 3ft long. im new to making knives and would like to use it for this purpose. Would this make a good knife? If so how do I go about tempering and heat treating it?

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Did yoiu google and ask for the specs on it? that will tell yoiu wot it has in it,,and you can compare that to wot it takes to make a good blade....The site shouild also have heat treat information if it is a steel that be helped by that.....And there are the knife makings lessons and heat treating data on this site...may be worth a lookl

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I did look on google, there isnt much on useing it for a knife. all i have found is that it is a structural steel and that the HY stands for high yeld. I have played with it a bit, and made a few knive as a keepsake for some friends. I more or less was wanting to know if anyone has heard of it and knows weather it would be a good material for a functional knife.

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Does it give the alloy and carbon content?  IF so it's told you all you need to know about using it for knives.

 

Didn't even need to follow a link from the google page

 

"HY100, This quenched and tempered low-carbon alloy steel finds uses as pressure vessels, heavy construction equipment, and in large steel structures"   From MatWeb

 

So tough and gooey rather than hard and edge holding.  Not a knife alloy!

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  • 9 years later...

I know I'm 9 years late but here's what I can tell you. I build nuclear submarines and work with this steel all the time. What the numbers represent is tensile strength. HY-80 is incredibly strong. HY-80 is meant to hold up to 80,000 psi (pulling on it), before breaking and HY-100 can hold up to 100,000 psi. Normally, with blade making this may not be the right type of steel, unless you want to use it for tug of war. I'm no blacksmith, so I could be wrong; The thinner you make it (especially using a forge) you could potentially change the integrity of it, and it may actually be far less superior as a blade, than traditional crucible steel, because it's more pure and has less carbon already. Even though it has enough to be somewhat flexible, it needs to be able to withstand a direct torpedo impact, etc. I work with it enough to understand it but am no expert, so like I said... I could be wrong. Others may have already addressed this but I didn't read the comments, so I may have repeated some things.

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Welcome aboard, glad to have you. Thank you for serving. If you'll put your general location in the header you'll have a better chance of meeting up with members living within visiting distance.

Yes, HY-80, etc. has been discussed regarding it's unsuitability as a blade steel. It's good to get further confirmation though. Your post raises a question from me though, are the HY series of steels amorphous?

My understanding is heat treatment is the key to producing amorphous steels so forging it at home would pretty much destroy the property. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Hey I have a block or two of Polaris missile sub steel around,  came from a University with a welding research group.  But yup; not a good blade steel.  An excellent steel alloy but not for blades.  People seem to think that high quality alloys should make good knives; unfortunately "high quality alloy" means designed for a specific purpose and so excellent for that purpose; but most of those purposes are not blades!

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