WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith

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About WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith

  • Rank
    Junior Member

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  • MSN
    [email protected]
  • Website URL
    http://WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Sunbright, Tennessee, WayneCoeArtist Blacksmith.com
  • Interests
    Blacksmithing, Bladesmithing.

Converted

  • Location
    Sunbright, Tennessee
  • Biography
    retired, former ABANA Board Member,
  • Interests
    Blacksmithing
  • Occupation
    retired

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  1. If what Glenn has stated does not adequately warn you read this article about a welder and break fluid. http://www.brewracingframes.com/safety-alert-brake-cleaner--phosgene-gas.html I have quoted this several times before on various forums but it bears repeating. Wayne
  2. I just have angle iron for the lower portion to hold the bricks. Remember, heat rises. It also appears that there is space between the bracket and the tank allowing heat to conduct up between the forge and the bracket. You may be running to rich with to much dragon's breath. Wayne Wayne Coe Artist Blacksmith 729 Peters Ford Road Sunbright, Tennessee 37872 423-628-6444 www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com [email protected]
  3. You can get more gradual adjustments with a gate valve than with a ball valve. With a ball valve you have a 1/4 turn from full closed to full open. With a gate valve you probably have about 15 360 degree turns to go from full open to full closed. Wayne Wayne Coe Artist Blacksmith 729 Peters Ford Road Sunbright, Tennessee 37872 423-628-6444 www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com [email protected]
  4. I have a 155 Blu Max and would not be without it. I would jump on a 110 for $4.000.00. What dies and tooling come with it? Where are you located? Does it have the duel limit switches? If not and you are close enough you could probably take it to BigBlu in Morganton, NC to have that added at minimal cost. Let me know if I can help you. Wayne Wayne Coe Artist Blacksmith 729 Peters Ford Road Sunbright, Tennessee 37872 423-628-6444 www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com [email protected]
  5. Like Scotty said, they make great bells. Cut one in two, flare the cut edge, insert the clapper through the hole for the valve. My wife hates it when I whistle to get her attention when she is in the barn or out in the pasture. Now she can get upset when I ring the bell. If I am out in the show she rings the "dinner bell". Wayne
  6. Ausfire, I didn't know that you had Texas Longhorn steers down under.
  7. Check out the Build a Gas Forge attachment for how I like to build a good, tuff, efficient, long lasting forge. You can use a Frosty T burner on it very well. Let me know how I can help you.. Wayne
  8. That was Ed Caffery on KnifeDogs.com. I have seen no others make a similar comment. I don't suggest mixing different products and expect to get a good comparison. I have been using both Plistix and Metrikote for the past `10 years and have never gotten similar results to what Ed describes. I have also used ITC-100 and though I have not tried to do side by side comparisons I find that they al give similar results. Wayne Wayne Coe Artist Blacksmith 729 Peters Ford Road Sunbright, Tennessee 37872 423-628-6444 www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com [email protected]
  9. Why pay $75.00, or more when you can get Plistix for $15.00 a pint or Metrikote for $20.00 a pint? Let me know if I can help you. Wayne Wayne Coe Artist Blacksmith 729 Peters Ford Road Sunbright, Tennessee 37872 423-628-6444 www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com [email protected]
  10. I can't see where the handle is on either of the "face" vises.
  11. I started with a 100# Peter Wright and spent most of my time chasing the anvil around the shop. Forging on the anvil would cause bounce back and walking. Of course, I could have bolted it to the floor and maybe stopped that. I also use the off side of the anvil often. With anything less than my 500# double horned anvil it moves when I strike from the side, even a 270# anvil. Yes Virginia, size does matter! Let me know if I can help you. Wayne
  12. Thomas referred to the "cutting plate" I find the use of that area useful as a "step" between the face and the "cutting plate". This provides a 90 degree area for being able to forge into a corner and compress stock, such as welding cable. As to having a "solid" attachment I make all of my hardy tools with a stem slotted (forge 1" X 1/4" U shape) stem long enough to drive a wedge in. Now that is solid. Thomas commented about the "cutting table". I use that area for the step as in when welding cable, the cable can be driven back into the 90 degree corner to contain it on 2 sides and driven from the 3rd. I never use that area for a "cutting table". I use a Habberman style European anvil and the hardy hole is on the horn end and over the mass of the anvil. French anvils are also double horned and have the hardy hole at the rounded horn but even further back over the solid mass. The hardy hole comes out the side of the anvil. TFS (Texas Farrier's Supply) is a good example of where a farrier saw a market for a double horned anvil so tried to modify a London style anvil to a European anvil by just tapering the heel but leaving the hardy hole in the heel, the weakest area of the anvil, then, if that was not enough tapered the sides in, further reducing the mass and the strength of that area. There is normally a reason that the old time blacksmiths made their anvils the way they did. I have been using my anvil for about 15 years and see all of the advantages of it and can not figure anyway to improve it. Let me know if I can help you. Wayne Wayne Coe Artist Blacksmith 729 Peters Ford Road Sunbright, Tennessee 37872 423-628-6444 www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com [email protected]
  13. You sure know how to get the guys drooling. Let us know how to contact the seller and it will be gone. My primary anvil is 500# and I am very happy with it but I would jump on that in a hart beat and drive to Michigan to pick it up and visit with friends along the way. Watch for me Jim Coke, Black Frog, Ron Bishop, Walt Badgero and others. Wayne
  14. Alan, with the new pictures they wouldn't do very well as post hole diggers. Here in the US post hole diggers have about a 6" diameter bits and thin. I make fire place shovels from 1" square and have a shovel face about 6" wide, So I think maybe a little bit larger than 1" would make bits beefy enough to work well. I may try making some and let you all know. I would probably draw out the handles though normally they are wooden which tend to break after a while. Wayne
  15. Alan, I'm late getting into this thread. The picture of you in front of the shop looks like you are holding a pair of post hole diggers. The ones that I can buy in the box stores seem to ware out to quickly. That pictures makes me think that I may have to forge a set from some 1.5" 440c that I have on hand. Of course, then I will have to get my son to use them. I'm just to old to be doing that any more. Wayne