Aubrey

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About Aubrey

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    Male
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    Guymon, Oklahoma

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  1. Aubrey

    Case Hardening

    All this is fascinating stuff. I have asked around here for it and nobody seems to know what I'm talking about. And since I've never really bought it or used it I don't know what I'm really asking for other than fire clay...Catch 22?
  2. Aubrey

    Case Hardening

    Thanks a million! Now that's good stuff! I don't know if ya'll watched, but the guy made some chisels he then used to cut teeth into some hand files -- also case hardened. It was a really interesting video. Thomas, you mentioned about a hard surface but supreme toughness. So the release mechanism for a crossbow trigger would qualify, right? I only ask because I wanted to build a crossbow a few years ago... Now, on fireclay: can you tell, at least to a point, what type of clay it is by the color? In past searches for the stuff I saw red, and white, as well as the dark grey graphite clay that costs an arm and leg. And can all fireclays be used to form temper lines on knives?
  3. Aubrey

    Case Hardening

    Okay thanks for the info! What exactly is blister steel? So what exactly would be an applicable application for case hardening?
  4. Hello all, I have been looking for some inexpensive methods to make some tools and I ran across this video on the youtube: It seems feasible by what this guy does that this could work, but there are a lot of variables I'm sure he did not put in there. So I have a few questions I'm sure you all can answer... 1. He says in the video that wrapping the thing in clay is not necessary, but what kind of clay should be used? ---What exactly IS "fireclay" and where does a guy find it? 2. Should the clay be allowed to dry before firing? 3. Is case hardening really a viable option? I'll warn you in advance: a lot of your answers will likely breed more questions from me.
  5. Thomas Powers: That's exactly right! I get it though, new and nice does have its appeal. Yeah I'd pay $$ for some of the tools I've seen you guys make on the youtube. Problem is: I do not have it! Haha! Besides big prices for good tools you never have to buy again is probably worth it. But for a beginner (from a beginner's perspective at least) it's unnecessary, possibly a waste of money.
  6. This is an incredibly interesting discussion here. I am 40 years old. I guess you could say I started this hobby 5 or 6 years ago while I worked in the oilfield. That's when I started scrapping for my propane forge. I finished building that forge just last month and I'm pretty happy with it, ugly welds and all. I can appreciate the talk about expense, but for me its pretty simple, and its been said here already. $50 for a HAMMER? My response: how often will you need another hammer? $3800 for an anvil (the one I'm jonesing for anyway)? My answer: I'm gonna need a headstone some day. For me its the thrill of CREATING something in a craft I have always had an interest in. It borders on the supernatural for me, using fire and fury to shape something beautiful (in theory) out of practically nothing. And trust me; I like doing that -- I have 6 children. I want to learn it, and I want to learn it well. To do so I must do it. And what better way to do it than to start making the tools I want? And someday when I have a little less hair up top and a lot more everywhere else maybe someone will buy what I make. Maybe not. Maybe I could make a living doing it. Maybe not. But I can definitely love DOING it.
  7. Aubrey

    Forge welding butchered metal

    Thanks for the nuggets of advice, very valuable knowledge. When I decide to start trying some more advanced stuff I'll certainly be picking ya'll's brains. I have no hands on resources close enough to home: nearest place I've found so far is 2 hours away. But I'm still digging and have a possible lead thanks to Mr. Stevens.
  8. Aubrey

    Forge welding butchered metal

    Okay I'm a noob and no where near the skill to make an axe or hammer yet (I'm gonna start trying soon though). But would the method you are referring to have something to do with a (kind of) fold, welding everywhere but where the eye will be, and then drifting? I was looking some axes over awhile back and wondered if they could be done this way. I'm not completely up to speed on all the lingo so I hope I made some sense...
  9. Aubrey

    Help

    Okay. I am not too tech savvy so this forum may not be the best place to toss my next question out. However, I live in Guymon, Oklahoma and I haven't been able to locate a group, or even one blacksmith close to home. There are some knife makers around I've heard, stock removal guys if I have the right info. There is a small group that gets together in Amarillo a couple times a month (and I have been invited and would like to go) but that's a good jog away. Can ANYONE tell me if there's a person close to me that I can learn a thing or two from?
  10. Aubrey

    First propane forge

    @Mikey Is my photo and video not showing on ya'lls end?
  11. Aubrey

    A use for Scale?

    A lot of good interesting info here guys! Thank you. As I am just getting started and working through the basics I get a lot of questions that pop into my noggin. But smelting??? I'll be honest, I think its a very appealing concept, but I am a VERY long ways from trying something that risky. Maybe some day in the not so near future I'll be brave/crazy enough to attempt some blooms. Crucible steel is fascinating stuff but I think it'd be best if I took some of Ric's classes or something like it before I try jumping into a project like that half cocked. For now I'm content soaking up all the knowledge accumulated by the thousands of collective years experience right here on IFI. Besides, I think perhaps a better topic header would be "A Use for Scale for a Beginner".
  12. Aubrey

    First propane forge

    Hi there Dustin, I am impressed with your forge. I am pretty new to the blacksmithing, and I finished mine a couple weeks ago. The video was a very short test burn before I coated the wool. I used a design I found called the Peot Blown Pipe forge, and I followed the directions as close to exactly as I could within my limited welding skillset. Since then I have been practicing hammer control by making a royal mess of mild stock. I not even at a good starting point to show off any work yet, but with each completion I'm finding more inspiration to continue. 20190113_215237.mp4
  13. Aubrey

    A use for Scale?

    Thanks Steve. So would it come out homogenous mixed as a powder in canister damascus? With a carbon additive?
  14. I browsed thru some of the topics here, so I apologize if I missed where this topic belongs... I have been reading on and watching some material on Canister Damascus and a little here and there on classical crucible steel; which leads me to a question I have been unable to find a definitive answer to... Can you throw all that messy scale into a crucible, or a canister, with a little charcoal to create steel? Has anyone tried this? I found this link only filled with a bunch of scientific greek that I simply can't follow. www.hindawi.com/journals/jm/2015/926028/
  15. I second that thanks! Dave's video was insightful, and I'm still in the process of watching Al's. Al, I noticed the guy tending the fire seems to have been pretty busy doing it. Was this much work on the fire actually needed or was he working the corn around in a bid to get it all coked up? I ask only because it makes me wonder how well the fire does for those couple of minutes each heat you're away from it.