Adam R

Another Shop Name

16 posts in this topic

I have been considering what to name my shop/business. Primarily I will be making decorative forged item and tools. I have been racking my brain for names that I could use and bouncing them off friends and family. My own name was considered, but as my children have started to bemoan, "Daddy why can't people say our name right?" That is probably not the one. One of my coworkers suggested "Legal Forgery", since that is what I am doing. I have received many funny looks, when I have said that I am going to forge something later. Then when I explain that I am a blacksmith people understand.

So I wanted to ask the IF folks if "Legal Forgery" sounds like a decent name. It is a little quirky, but I have been called that before. The name has the benefit of not already being used on Etsy, or a search of the Internet. It may be too dumb a name for anyone else, but that's why I am asking you for your opinions.

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There are several discussions on shop names on the site.

The condensed version is the name should be short, easy to remember, and able to be sold to the person that wants to buy out your shop at a later time.

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Glenn- thanks for the comment. I didn't want to hijack the other threads. They helped me eliminate some names that might turn clients away, etc. All of my friends have chuckled a bit at the name, and said they liked it. I just wanted to check with a wider audience.

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Well, it that is going to be your forge's name, forge a check mark to be incorporated.  It's a Forged Check.  I make them at demonstrations and always get a good laugh.

Wayne

 

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A business name should tell people what you do.  Like "I Forge Iron".  It might have the word "blacksmith" in it for example.  If I google the word metal, forge, or blacksmith, would it show up?  Good luck.  

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A check mark would be an easy touchmark, but I am pretty sure people will think it's a "like" though. Maybe I will keep thinking about it.

I am doing a couple demo shifts at the county fair next week. I will run it by some strangers, and see how they react with little coaching.

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Before you finally decide on the name, make one last test. Write the name on a piece of paper 25 times and see if people REALLY want to write you a check for your work. Overly long names will not pass the check writing test.

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What about the "Adamr Forge" ?

 

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No, you want people to know immediately how to pronounce it. "Is that 'Adam-R Forge' or 'Adamrrrrr Forge'?"

I like "Legal Forgery". Clever and memorable.

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Good point. Being French there was only one way for me to pronounce it. My point was to get the name of the blacksmith in there.

Unless one has a wide market, I do not see an advantage in not having your name appear. I am thinking for instance at "Kim Thomas Ironworks", "Brent Bailey Forge". Easy to remember and to me it creates a link with potential customers that they can call you by your name.

As to "Legal Forgery", yes. I had read "Legal Forge" and did not like it. But "forgery" is OK with me.

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As for personal names: what happens when you "sell" your business?  Do they continue to use your name or do they lose all the customers that know that name when you change it to something else?

The Blacksmith formerly known as Wilelm

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On 8/1/2017 at 3:22 PM, SoCal Dave said:

A business name should tell people what you do.  Like "I Forge Iron".  It might have the word "blacksmith" in it for example.  If I google the word metal, forge, or blacksmith, would it show up?  Good luck.  

SoCal Dave is right.  The word "Forge" in your business name virtually guarantees that you're never going to be on the first page of a google search.  In 2017 customers who can't find you on the first page of a google search, won't bother with you. 

Think about how much money was spent on marketing to teach the world that "Gap" means clothing store.  If you don't have that kind of money, you might consider naming yourself for what you actually sell in terms your customer would use.

The majority of people will not search for "forge" or "forged" unless they're researching identity theft.

All of that being said, "Legally forged" is a clever tagline that could feature in your marketing and banter. 

I recommend naming a business after a prominent natural  or geographical feature because everyone loves nature.  If your surname is difficult to pronounce for American's perhaps there is a notable natural or geographical feature you could choose near your ancestors.  A while back there was a similar post from a smith located in a village who's name translated to something that evoked a beautiful image.  Perhaps your surname translates to something similarly inspiring in English? 

Decorative items often suggest artistry and sensitivity to beautiful aesthetics.  "That's a pretty name, where did you come up with it?" is an opening to share your sensibilities which in turn connects the buyer emotionally to your work.

There's only one "you", and your culture, heritage, and location are all ways that people can relate to you.  Selling hand-made decorative items and tools in 2017 means convincing the buyer it's a good value.  Either they're paying more for a personal connection to the maker, or they're saving money because it's cheaper than anywhere else.

 

 

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I have to go along with the searchability of any form of Forge. It's become a marketing "power word" and you see it everywhere on everything so it loses it's meaning to blacksmithing. Even "blacksmith" is becoming a buzz word. 

A word or term can only have "special" meaning for so long, then it's just a word. For an easy to try example, pick a word that means something to you, something obvious. Now repeat it out loud say 25 times and try writing it or what it means. I don't recall why but it was an exercise we did in a class in high school.

A thing I have to be very careful of is my knack for word play, I have to walk a thin line between clever and burying what I want in a joke. When the internet first went public I used to have, "If it ain't forged it ain't Real. The FrostWorks." as a sign off. I still have "The FrostWorks" in mind but will probably never go into a business so it's something for a frame on my idea wall. The tag line works okay to set up the company name to be memorable but too  many folks just don't get it.

Word play comes to mind automatically, I free associate everything I hear but it's rarely suitable for a business name. "Forge" in any form comes to my mind instantly in relation to business names but that's telling me it's too over used to be any good for a blacksmith operation. There's a business in an old feed supply I drive past on the way to our Vet and I double take the name every time, it has Forged and Blacksmith in it in a reasonably catchy way. I finally had to stop after creeping by to discover it's a Gym.

"Hand Forged by (your name here)" won't confuse people but isn't going to show up on a search. 

I wish I had an even okay suggestion after that long ramble but I don't. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Frosty's comment reminded me of an observation an older buddy of mine made.  He's been doing blacksmith demo's for at least twenty-odd years now which naturally leads to lots of public interaction. 

He said that he encounters a lot of young, aspiring knifemakers who hand him a card which invariably reads: "Something, Something, Forge" on it. 

To him, "Something, Something Forge" is the marketing equivalent of asking someone out on a date by saying "So my... parents are out of town..."!

Getting back to the OP, I checked your profile location, then googled cities in South Metro Minnesota.  Minnetonka popped out at me as recognizable.  According to Wikipedia, Minnetonka means "Great Water". 

I think "Great Water Ironworks" sounds impressive, as does "Great Water Custom Tools".  Wiki tells me Minnetonka is a Dakota word.  "Dakota Decorative Iron" might work for you as well. 

 

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Leave it to a pro to point out the obvious, it's what makes you a Rockstar! I just Googled Minnesota which is derived from Sioux words for cloudy or sky tinted water.  While these might not make good business names for a smith, there are thousands of place names that might. 

America is filled with folk from other countries that have brought their traditions, customs and language with them. Finding a "regional" company name based on original words meanings is a terrific idea.

Frosty The Lucky.

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These are some great point to ponder. Being a transplant to MN hadn't sent me down the local/regional name thought process. My thoughts with geographical context were to the US side of things with "forge" tacked onto the end. I agree with the word being overused.

I love the different perspectives on this site. Thanks for sharing with us beginners.

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