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What are some DIY methods of cutting your own bar stock to fit your vehicles when you buy them? The cut charges were high the last time (which was also the first time, actually) I went to buy bar stock. I’d rather spend that on steel, not their torch gas. 

Would a 24” bolt cutter work? Or is it not strong enough? Angle grinder and a portable generator?  Or should I try strapping the 20’ stock to a 2 by on the top of my pick up’s cap? I’m a newbie, so I’m mainly interested in 1/4-1/2” square/round stock.

Thanks! 

-Bridget

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Use a chisel or hacksaw to notch the stock, say 1/2 the thickness,  then bend and it snaps.

Cut it the length you can haul, say 10 feet lengths. Just be sure to tie it down well with a red flag on the end.

Once you get it home think about that 20 foot length and how you can use it.  One 20 foot length will yield 2 ea 10 foot, 4 ea 5 foot, 5 ea 4 foot, 6 ea 3 foot, 10 ea 2 foot, and 20 ea 1 foot pieces. The 18 inches, 16 inches, are good numbers as they are 2 per 3 foot section and 3 per 4 foot section.  Make your designs use these full sections and you end up with no scraps. 

Thomas Powers uses a bow saw with a metal bandsaw blade instead of a wood blade for cutting metal in the field. Longer stroke and easier cutting that way.

And who said you must tie to to the top of the cab? If your careful you can secure it under the truck. Avoid the curbs, sharp transitions to inclines and leave room for the suspension to work and the tires to turn.

Do not build a box and you will not have to think outside the box. Then everything becomes an opportunity. (grin) 

 

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1 hour ago, WoodFireMetal said:

Thanks!  Should I bring extra blades? How quickly do they wear out?  If I open the windows to the cab and cap, I can probably get up to 12ft without any hanging out.  

 

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If you ask at the desk they will charge you per cut. Ask in the yard where you pick it up and you could probably get it done for nothing except a box of donuts. Or if you break out the hacksaw they may offer to cut it just to get you out of there.  

Pnut

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Well, having a cordless sawzall and angle grinder, I usually take them and extra batteries/blades, cutoff wheels. Those tools come in useful for many jobs in my work, especially the cordless sawzall. 

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In my family car, I carry large bolt cutters for exactly that purpose, can shear up to 1/2" square  to suitable lengths to fit inside.

Previously when i had a more industrial vehicle I had a guillotine/shear which would cut up to 2" x 1/2", mounted on a steel plate that extended from the rear of the guillotine/shear by about 12".

I then used to park a rear wheel on the plate, and cut the steel as required,

No Batteries, electric supply or a lot of physical effort needed, saving energy, especially mine!

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If you let people know you're a blacksmith, some things start making their way directly to your smithy;)

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Up to 1/2" can be done with some 36"-48" bolt cutters. They are usually marked for capacity.

Hacksaw

cordless saw

Small cutting torch setup

A lot depends on how many you are getting at a time.

My Dad mentioned how he used to see long ladders strapped under Model T's. I have seen rebar on hangers that are on the side of a truck. I have done items up and over the cab. Just pad the roof where the contact is, then a strap down to the bumper to keep it from bouncing. Then there is always the option of adding a ladder or stock rack to the truck.  At the hydraulics shop we had large diameter PVC tubes on the truck to put the steel hydraulic lines into instead of tying them down.

 

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you have more options with 20' lengths, not to mention the cut fee.

with a pickup you have many options. 

be creative.

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I bought a 24” bolt cutter and a hack saw, for starters.  I won’t be buying large quantities any time soon. 

I may take an extra long 2 by and see how it straps down to the cap. I can probably wrap the 20’ pieces to it. 

Thanks! 

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Long long ago before I had a pick up I had to carry some long stock with my Blazer. I laid it on the ground, pulled over the stock and strapped it up to the front & rear bumpers. Put big red flags on both ends so no one would run into it. Quite a sight going down the road and probably lucky no police saw me.:lol::o

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I've always been thankful for not drawing police notice. Happily  I don't have far to go for steel, about 20 miles and roads around here are wild west enough police don't bat an eye at a well secured load. Hanging a long load under a car might get a double take but seeing as the average 4 door is 15' long the stick out wouldn't be an issue. Heck, even if you drove a Morris Minor stock wouldn't be sticking out more than what, 4' front and back? 

Nylon ratchet straps front and rear and I bet nobody'll bat an eye. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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2 hours ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

Long long ago

lol, I was going to mention that, I too did that with a bloody Honda civic!

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My supplier has a chop saw right out in the parking area. I cut the steel into thirds, 6'-8", and load it my Leaf. I wrap it in old sheets to keep things clean. 

The place is run by a Chinese guy who knows how to keep his customers coming back. 

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6 hours ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

I carried about 700 pounds of sucker rod (cut into pieces) in my Honda Civic. I think the front wheels were only on the ground about half the time.

Wow!! That poor car! 

 

8 hours ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

Long long ago before I had a pick up I had to carry some long stock with my Blazer. I laid it on the ground, pulled over the stock and strapped it up to the front & rear bumpers. Put big red flags on both ends so no one would run into it. Quite a sight going down the road and probably lucky no police saw me.:lol::o

That would definitely be a double take for me!!

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On 6/28/2019 at 10:52 AM, WoodFireMetal said:

What are some DIY methods of cutting your own bar stock to fit your vehicles when you buy them? The cut charges were high the last time (which was also the first time, actually) I went to buy bar stock. I’d rather spend that on steel, not their torch gas. 

Would a 24” bolt cutter work? Or is it not strong enough? Angle grinder and a portable generator?  Or should I try strapping the 20’ stock to a 2 by on the top of my pick up’s cap? I’m a newbie, so I’m mainly interested in 1/4-1/2” square/round stock.

Thanks! 

-Bridget

18v Angle grinder with thin 1mm cutting disk, face mask and hearing protection. Nothing could be easier. 

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21 hours ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

I carried about 700 pounds of sucker rod (cut into pieces) in my Honda Civic.

Lol,, And there was that honda civic moment when the dozen 20' lengths of half square were strapped across  the top and the front tie wire went "Sproing" . 4:30 pm, 3 lanes of freeway!!!  And I got her reloaded and made it out of there and No Ticket! True proof that God does smile on fools and blacksmiths!!  

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