marcusb

New Shop Build

Recommended Posts

Well I have begun to build what will be my 5th shop. My current setup is in an old machinery building/ horse stall and between roof leaks, gophers and no room due to sharing space with farm equipment I have decided its time to make a dedicated structure. This new shop will still pull double duty as a mechanic shop as needed but I think I have got it planned out well enough to minimize the junk buildup. I have been sawing ash trees on my property that have been killed by the ash bore for the majority of the lumber. The posts are recycled from another pole barn that the owner wanted out of there way. I went to auctions and bought lumber I did not want to saw out. I have got the layout decided, now I just have to build the thing.121312119_Polesfornewshopset.thumb.jpg.e62c50fb2f5fa9e8feabf4c725b7730f.jpg

 

First load of lumber

Lumber load 01.jpg

 

Second load of lumber

Lumber load 02.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great start; how are you going to floor it?  You could nail PT lumber around the perimeter and fill it with crusher fines. Having the floor above grade makes it a tad drier; though Ohio is a bit swamplike compared to out here.

I used propanel for my roof and walls on the theory the less that can catch on fire the better. (Steel purlins and trusses too). Again local environment considerations. Fire is fairly common around here---hence my house has a steel roof now too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Current plan is to skirt it with pressure treated wood, then install board and batten I have been sawing above that. Flooring in the forge area will be crushed pea gravel, I find its easiest on my feet. The main mechanic area will be larger stone until funds allow concrete. I am planning on pouring one corner 6'x10' with concrete so I can frame it in and insulate it. I'm going to keep my mill, and future lathe in there to keep it away from all the dirt,grime and condensation. Going to add a little wall stove and window ac unit to give me a lounging spot in all seasons :D

Here's is the mill setup I have been using. Nothing fancy but it makes boards.

Bob the Debarker.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sawing your own lumber from trees on your property is very cool.  Are you making beams out of the ash or just boards?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I"m sawing some 8" beams from the lower grade stuff, I need it for cribbing under the anvil of a self contained hammer i'm setting in this new shop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just a little jealous B)

Would love to be able to mill my own lumber...not a lot of forrest's out here in Nebraska though.

It will be cool to see how your board and batten turns out. Much nicer looking that steel siding I'm sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I have found out, sawing lumber out of ash is real work! Its a heavy wood so rolling the logs and then the cants takes all the strength I have. I did setup the mill next to a bank and bury some timbers to act as rails for the log to roll on (log deck). This is a big time saver because instead of using a tractor to lift the logs up onto the mill or fighting logs up a ramp using wedges to keep them from rolling back, I can roll them from the ground right onto the mills frame. Something to consider doing if you are setting up a small band mill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I need to correct the grade of my shop site and add some fill dirt on a low corner. I should have started with a level site but I lacked the proper equipment to move and grade the dirt. Today I went to a local sale and purchased some older Ford implements for my Ford tractor.  I purchased a scoop to move the fill dirt into position and a rotating box blade to grade it out. This should be a real upgrade from the wheelbarrow and shovel!

IMG_4734.JPG

IMG_4736.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember to pack the fill material a few inches at a time, more fill material, more packing etc.

Any drainage system(s) should be installed before the fill material is added.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have made some progress between the rain showers we have had. All the perimeter girts are now done. I decided to extend the door height to 12 feet. My posts were to short so I pinned and boxed in a stub of 6x6 to gain the height I need for the taller door.  Today I made two laminated 4"x 8"  posts. I'm going to set these in the center section with steel across the span to lift items off my truck in the future. 

IMG_4822.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent and inspirational. That's a great mill. My go to milling setup is an Alaskan mill and a sthil 046. 

May this be your best and last! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had it with the mud! I went to my local stone quarry today and got a few tons of #4 on the old truck. In the morning I will move some dirt to correct the grade, compact that and then shovel a few tons of these #4's on it. 

IMG_4868.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first year down here near El Paso we had a full week where it was 112 degF or more for the high every day.  But it's a dry heat---like licking a piece of red hot steel!

On the other hand a good rain is one that leaves 1/2"---NM definition of a 3" rain is one with 3" between raindrops on the dust...We're in a true desert, 9" of precip a year or less.

I lived 15 years in Columbus Ohio and was pleasantly surprised when both my heating and my cooling bills were cheaper out here.

Take I-70 west, switch down to I-40 west in MO/AR and remember to take a left at Albuquerque! (On I-25)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read that you are leaving a 6' x 10' area for a lathe.  I'm also in the planning stage for that.  From what I've read on the machine tool forums the average time from buying a lathe to buying a milling machine is about three months !  You may want to reserve a bit more room. :D 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought my little index 40 mill about 6 years ago. Shortly after I got it home, we began a long series of property moves and I hate to say I have never got it set up. I have been diligently keeping the ways greased and keeping it out of the weather. I think that 3 month time table will be right, I am planning to seek out a lathe once the mill is up and running! 

What mill and lathe are you planning for Paper Patch? 

 

IMG_4871.JPG

Speaking of Lathes I wish I had one! I needed 8 bolts 13" long for the front posts on my building. Locally the only thing available was 12". I ended up cutting some 1/2 round stock to length, threading one end with a die by hand and welding a nut on the other. I gave them a coat of paint since they will be going thru treated posts. I dream of the day when I can chuck something up in the lathe and cut the thread out! Soon enough I hope.

IMG_4873.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I made a mess today fighting the mud...

Brought some fill dirt in with the scoop...

IMG_4876.JPG

I put on the Roll Over Box Blade and smeared it around a bit......:D

IMG_4877.JPG

Then gave it a sprinkle of stone....

 

IMG_4880.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/8/2018 at 5:34 PM, marcusb said:

What mill and lathe are you planning for Paper Patch? 

If I knew more about rebuilding I might look at a used Monarch, but the lack of that skill plus the size problem has lead me to look at imported lathes.  The brand I've spent the most time investigating is Precision Matthews ( precisionmatthews.com ). I keep succumbing to the features list of the next most expensive model and thus bracket creep keeps raising what I'll have to pay.  In a way it is a good thing that I won't have the carport enclosed with a new poured floor until late next year (more time to save up). I'm now waiting for my electrician to pull wires so I'll have 240 volt electricity in the newly remodeled 1938 garage. My wife says I can use it for 5 years as a blacksmith shop.  And that 5 years should be enough time to build a large shed to house my blacksmithing gear (she wants to be able to finally park a car in there and escape removing ice and snow in our New England winters).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've made some progress between the rain showers. I have all the girts bolted on now. I notched out the last of the beams today for bolting but the rain got me in the end before I could set the cross braces. Oh well, it looks like we should have one day without rain this weekend. If the weather cooperates i'm going to set rafters.

I have been researching insulation ideas for metal roofing. If anyone has a product they like please let me know. 

IMG_4960.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you talking true insulation of just a vapor barrier? At the very minimum you will need either 1/4" fan fold or some single bubble insulation to control condensation and dripping. I made the mistake of not using some on one of my additions and it rains from condensation every day in the summer or when it's humid.

If you are talking true insulation then it's hard to beat fiberglass batts for the cost. Obviously if your rafters are more then 24" o.c. batts are harder.

Whats your roof construction going to be, and what are you thinking in terms of insulation thickness?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used propanel steel roofing on metal C purlins with the panels held on with self drilling/self tapping metal screws with gaskets.  Of course my area is more characterized by high winds and little rain and pretty much zilch snowload.  (And I got all mine free when all the local schools had to replace their roofs due to hail damage---softball sized hail!  Hitting at 90 mph according to the University.  My roof was done from the "over-runs/drops as I was friends with the guy hired to clean up after the roofing crew got done.)

I did buy a couple of fiberglass panels new to use as skylights...

I'd check what folks around YOU are using.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am currently interested in preventing the rain showers inside a building I have seen with a metal roof. Long term I would like to plan for full insulation as funds allow. With this in mind I am leaning towards smaller rafters on 24" centers. The other option I have used in the past is 1" board sheathing all the way across the roof, felt on that then tin on top. It works well, but honestly I don't think I want to saw that much wood out. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would go with single bubble. If you have any local lumber yards that specialize in pole barns give them a call and check the price. Locally there is a place where I can get single bubble with one foil face and one white scrim face for about half the price of anywhere else. If I remember right it was around $75 for a 4'x125' roll. Throw some purlins on your rafters, roll your bubble from ridge to eave, then throw your steel on. If you can't find bubble locally then 1/4" foam fan fold works also, it's just not as easy and the birds tear it apart easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.