yt12

Logging Saw

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Good day all----a general question if I may. And if it has been previously discussed, sorry!!! Over the years I have acquired a number of "vintage" logging hand saws---the big ones !! some marked some not .I have a few blade ideas in mind, wondering if these might provide good material-----YES, I know back in the day quality was all across the board-----just wondering IN GENERAL what success there has been in using these old logging saws. Further, if care is taken (temp wise) is further heat treating needed.

Thanks in advance !!!

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If you have enough material in each, then test each saw with spark test and hardenability. it's all unknown so using it to make functional blades it is up to you to test before using. sure someone here may have made blades from some but likely they differ from yours. sorry it is a broad answer, but it's a broad question. best answer is test and try. each saw blade will need it's own testing.

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In general: yes; but as mentioned TEST It will help you dial in heat treat too: proper quenchant, best tempering temp for your usage, etc.

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Gents----

Thank you for the input--it is appreciated. Let the testing begin. My first donor is thin enough for project #1 ...3 filet knives of different lengths----with a bit of flex. Fwiw, I have more experience working with wood and glass (not making ANY claims !!)  so all feed back is a help

Thanks again !!

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I have to assume you are just giving a flip answer---even branded saws in good shape have limited value---these have broken teeth and are not a "collector" item---the question stands---for those with something that will not be used and hold little resale value----why not re purpose ? baffles me why some cannot just address a simple question.The original question stands----does anyone have GENERAL experience in using old saw blade material ? a few have had helpful insight.

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Not a flip answer at all. First of all, without seeing your sawblades, we don't know what kind of shape they're in or what they might sell for to a collector, an antique shop, or a junkyard. 

More importantly, you're going to be putting in a fair amount of time testing each individual blade for hardenability, with no guarantees of success. With known steel, on the other hand, you know what you're getting and how to work with it, and will be able to spend your time and effort on making decent blades. 

If you insist on using your blades, make sure to factor the time you'll spend testing the steel and remaking unusable blades into your total outlay. You may find it easier and cheaper in the long run simply to get some known material.

 

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Holy cow

Ive got a dozen old saws with zero resale value---asked the most generic nebulous question---FULLY aware ALL blades and manufacturers are different I know I cant identify the specific blade material ----HEY,anybody have any GENERAL feedback on using GENERAL old logging saw blades ? daswulf and TP gave the best advise ---test and see what happens---simple enough and my plan----ABSOLUTELY no reason to make this so complicated.Thanks again for the EARLY responses.

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Known steel that has data sheets lets you select the metal specific for your needs. You get the right working temperatures, quenchant, heat treating, etc the first time.

Folks are simply trying to be helpful and based on their experience, save you time and money. A knife is a thing of beauty until you try to use it and it fails. Then all your time and effort does translate into money and hours lost.

Go for it. Convert the mystery metal into something useful and be proud. Spark test, and do everything you can to prove what type process you need to put the metal through to achieve the results you want. You can do that as you have the whole length of that saw blade to work with. The entire process starts over with the next saw blade.

Please keep us informed as to your progress. Include photos if they are available.

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If it hardens up, it is capable (with proper method heat treating) of being made into a blade. You are the only one who can test your blades, which means that you are the only person who can tell us if they will work. Need more be said? You asked for general feedback on a general question, and that's exactly what you got.

Do it. If they have zero value, selling them won't do you a whole lot of good. It's not like we don't experiment with unknown steels ourselves. Cut a little piece off, and play with it. See what works and what doesn't. Known steels make life easier, but experimenting is one of the best ways to educate yourself. Go for it, and post the results. I'll be interested in seeing how it works out for you.

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Test and make a fillet knife!! I'm going to do the same thing before to long! I've tested and failed and broke more things than I should, but I learned a bit from it all!!

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Thanks again for the input---the project will begin shortly.I have to think there are thousands of these big saws out there ,a few being used,a few hanging on walls,some collecting dust---and I bet more than a few have been chopped up and re-purposed.

soon to be filleting 

yt

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One of my prized possessions is a tavasr (aka "ulu") from Anvik, Alaska, which one of the villagers made from a sawblade discarded by my great-grandfather. I don't think it was given any special heat treatment, though!

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I have at least 3 of these old saws. One in nice shape and from the family so it will stay on my wall of antique tools. The other two are hanging out there as well for the time being. One decent and one not so. 

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Dont know how it happens----but it does !! ended up with a bunch of them over the years,some free the others I know I didnt pay more than a few bucks for----at least 2  in bad (good ?) enough shape to get carved up.Would love to hear anyones hits or misses using these blades in the past.Daswulf----next few days i need to post a "it followed me home"----curious to hear your input---I sense you also like to "adapt and adjust" !

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I'm always adapting and adjusting. It's a hobby for me so I can " play" since it doesn't pay my bills. ( tho it's nice when it can supplement itself a  little bit.)

A lot of the advice to use new known stock ( which Is actually good advice) is based on the fact that #1 the heat treat methods are known. And #2 there can be stress in used steel leading to possible failure/ breaking of the piece anywhere in the process. Possibly after hours of work or even in final use. Among other reasons. (This advice is given to help you succeed easier.) But it can work out great as well so if you are ok with a possible failure and hours lost then go for it. You up the success rate by the testing pieces of the stock before putting the time in. Also inspect the piece you intend to use. If a piece looks off, like a line or other anomaly, avoid that section. 

I experiment a lot with scrap, granted much of it scrap sculpture, but also in the forge as well. I have had my share of success and failure with different pieces. I enjoy the journey and I'm always learning more and I'm knowing more on what works and what does not. I'd be in heaven with a workshop in the middle of a large scrapyard. :) I'm working on that lol

The saws should be safe enough but just remember to look through the safety sections here if you haven't already. Some scrap just isn't worth the risk to your health to repurpose. 

 

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I have one that is a major reason I'm married to my wife of 33 years...not repurposing it!.

Generally I assume the old ones are between 1070 and 1095; low alloy and the entire blade is the same alloy. (unlike some of the newer bandsaw blades where the edge steel and the rest of the blade are NOT the same stuff)

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T Powers----

Thank you for the input---I agree,one needs to be careful where your repurposing may take you  !  Of the 8-10 old logging saws I have,could well be 8-10 different mfgs and perhaps 8-10 different alloys used------2 on the donor list.I think I should have started this thread on a broader base.  Im sure many blades have been crafted from these old saw blades,was curious about others hits and misses.

If you dont mind me asking---did I read that you once lived in Cols OH. ?

Thanks again

yt

TP----

Had to re-fresh my fading memory-----went back and saw an old post about your past time in Cols./Parsons Ave.If I may ask----were you in the "metal" industry way back when ?

(feel free to tell me its none of my business ?)

Thanks

yt

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there is a thread where I did about 120 blades from a few saw blades, but I am too lazy to look for it

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SS-----

Thanks !!   I will see if I can track it down.

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Quick tip on searching the forum: don't use the Search box in the upper right; it's pretty worthless. Instead, use the search engine of your choice and include "iforgeiron.com" as one of your search terms.

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The book "Step by Step Knifemaking" is substantially based on making blades from old saws.  Do an ILL on it at the Library!

Any yes I spent 15 years living between Parsons and High street on the south side---below German Village but within walking distance of Schiller park.  I was smithing the whole time as my primary hobby. Lots of anvils in that city! At one time I was a cofounder of the MOB, Mid Ohio Blacksmiths; but last I heard it had broken up after I left.

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TP---

  • Been on the East side for about 12 years----in a small world---about 4-5 years ago went to an estate sale on Parsons,didnt think it would be much driving by the front of the house on Parsons---typical pill box---in back,holy cow ! HUGE shop.Turns out the gentleman was an internationally acclaimed metallurgist /tester/fabricator---did alot of work for Battelle/Lockheed----went to see a listed "large vise" (priced above my pay grade)---ended up with the mother of all followed me homes----more than a ton of the biggest mixed bag youve ever seen including more than 100 lbs of Ti ---one 60 lb block labeled "LOCKHEED"-----30 BUCKS FOR THE LOAD  !!!! and wasnt a drop in the bucket of "scrap" that sold !!

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felt more motivated today here it is, the pics seem to have gone tho :(

 

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