Recommended Posts

My smithy is outside and I have sand and gravel - no dirt. I had a pile of railroad tie plates, the ones that go on top of the wood tie and the rail lays across it. I flipped them upside down, the swept sand over them to set them.  Works pretty good. acceesories_image1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 The brick floors I've seen were common hard fired red brick.  They were laid tight to each other with no mortar

The sand slurry was pit run glacial sand  mixed with enough water to make it flow and level out like wet concrete.  

The sand  slurry was screed flat and level with a long straight  board and then allowed to firm up as it dried.  

The slurry method was a fairly quick one  way to get a firm level compacted substrate for the brick floor, but this could have also been done with a compactor and shovel ,  rake and level.

After the bricks were laid on top of the sand , more sand was sprinkled on top and then swept clean, filling in any cracks.

It's a nice floor for a blacksmith shop with just enough give to be easy on your body,  good traction ,fireproof, drains any spills and can be easily repaired or taken up to run wires or piping under the floor.

If I was going to build a new blacksmith shop from scratch , this is  or  compacted dirt  is the kind of floor I would put down.

I personally don't like spending my day working on a concrete slab and think using the floor as a layout surface is inconvenient and in the way.

My preference  instead is to have a couple of  steel tables dedicated for the purpose. Large or heavy pieces get moved around or in and out of the shop with an overhead jib crane

I mostly do large pieces like gates, stair railings  and staircases and like having the work up at a comfortable height where I can get all around it.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have worked on concrete, dirt, sand, wood and crushed stone. Concrete kills the body, sand kills the machines, wood (not end grain) burns, dirt can be messy.I have found crushed stone to be a great compromise. That's what I have now, and love it. Only drawback is you cannot move heavy objects around as easily, but that can be overcome with overhead lifting options or in my case, a tractor with a lifting boom. I have poured concrete under my hammer, and as a vise base etc. Very economical and low maintenance. Just my solution over the years, I hope you find yours, good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A classic compromise was a wooden floor surrounding a gravel floore  surrounding the forge and anvil. A bit of sawdust mixed in provide smoke plumes to find hot offcuts

Typicaly screenings from a rock crusher are corset than sand and pack solid like cement. Acasinaly raking and wetting keeps it in good order. Reject sand is another animal, being clay, silt and large sand/small gravel. Makes a good adobe flore (as dose roadbase from a material yard). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now