templehound

Jungle crow

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It took me 2513, Ceylon ironwood, copper and a month to form this knife, suitable for every day use in the rainforest.

Blade was forged from square stock Boehler TWR 1.2513 (...the good stuff from the 70's)

Handle and sheath are made from a single piece of Ceylon iron wood(Mesua Ferrea) and the center of the flower is the riveted tang.

Blade length is 200 mm and it measures overall 345 mm (13 1/2 inches).

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That is excellent, well thought out, quality materials and workmanship, a truly great working blade. I love the very solid looking retaining lock!

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Oh my, now you really touched a nerve! This is absolutely my favorite of all your works I've seen. To attach roughness and elegance so successfully - great work, amazing!

Best wishes!

Gergely

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I can't tell if the spine has a pattern in it or if there is a reflection off something near by.  I really like the colors you've combined on that.  Very nicely done.

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20 hours ago, Stormcrow said:

You have such exquisite attention to detail on everything, on a tool that begs to be used daily.  Beautiful!

Thank You, James! ......stay Neo!

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It is such fine work that you have created a moral dilemma.  When a tool crosses the line into becoming a piece of art is it appropriate to use it as a tool?

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8 hours ago, T.J.watts said:

Very beautiful piece, I really like the design and how it looks in the sheath.

Thanks, T.J. watts!

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8 hours ago, Lou L said:

It is such fine work that you have created a moral dilemma.  When a tool crosses the line into becoming a piece of art is it appropriate to use it as a tool?

That dilemma starts with me in already, when I'm putting the finer finish on all the pieces......sometimes it feels a little bit like making sand pictures or ice sculptures....

there are(mostly) three kinds of customers. Those customers who preserve it in fine finished, unused condition in their collection.

 Or customers who appreciating the patina that occurs with controlled and careful use.....(or customers that do both, use some knives and some not.)

The third kind of customers do not care about anything at all, whether it is art or money. They buying an expensive knife and can afford to ruin it.

I am doing my best to avoid selling knives to such folks, but mostly You never know before.

So at the end I have to admit that I do a fine finish for my own satisfaction, to really see and enjoy the knife.... lasting only for the moment or a period of time.

 Everything is impermanent.

Thank You Lou L!

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Hardening back to my philosophy background:. You reminded me of a great pre-Socratic philosopher named Heraclitus who believed that change was the only constant and cautioned, "A man can never step into the same river twice."  So just master that moment and help that knife realize itself because the it can never be revisited.

 

...someone should start a philosophy of blacksmithing thread....

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