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I swapped the motor pulley for a V pulley on my South Bend, and use a V belt on the flat drive pulley, its been running with the same belt since the mid 60.s. Also a neighboring shop across the alley, uses one of those cogged timing belts upside down on the cone pulleys, you have to remove the headstock to install it tho.

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I got this lathe a few years back I think I gave the guy around 300 bucks for it...


Clinton, my lathe does not have the change gear chart on it. Could you do me a big favor and re-photograph and post the change gear chart, without the glare, so that I could have a copy for reference purposes?

Pretty please. :D
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Ok here's one for everyone - who's got one like this???????.... late 1920's Monarch. 14"x20". Does anyone have any info on one like this??? If so I'd be interested in copies of it. Does anyone know about or how to rebuild one like this? If so I'd again be interested. - JK

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Jr - geezzz - I'm triing to be nostalgic here - surely it can be rebuilt to use. I just need to find someone that hasn't died yet that knows anything about it. LMAO - JK


Jr - what's the newest thing you have in your shop? :D

Edited by jeremy k
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well jeremy, i'd love that monarch! But then i do have a soft spot for large cast iron machines...

Are those broken gear teeth really a problem? Do they just mean you have one less speed?
I'm sure there is a post about pinning and building up broken gear teeth somewhere here.

With a machine that solid you could turn up anvil horns and skim the face :)

Give it turn and tell us how it goes.

AndrewOC

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  • 3 weeks later...
Jr - geezzz - I'm triing to be nostalgic here - surely it can be rebuilt to use. I just need to find someone that hasn't died yet that knows anything about it. LMAO - JK


Jr - what's the newest thing you have in your shop? :D


Try the method I detailed in this thread for gear repair.

As for the machine, the controlls appear quite standard to me. Any machine text should be able to identify the levers and clutches for you.

http://www.iforgeiron.com/forum/f46/gear-rebuild-4846/
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Ok here's one for everyone - who's got one like this???????.... late 1920's Monarch. 14"x20". Does anyone have any info on one like this??? If so I'd be interested in copies of it. Does anyone know about or how to rebuild one like this? If so I'd again be interested. - JK


Someone here will know. I ran one identical to it. Great lathe...Bob
Monarchlathe : Monarch-Lathe
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I for one believe that the big Monarch will ultimately outperform any of the smaller imports available. Frankly I wish at times I had that much mass in my lathes as currently I am using an Atlas 12 x 36 and a Southbend 10 x 48. The latter is a fine machine while the former does O.K. However neither has the headstock bore to meet all of my needs. On the other hand, I don't know where I'd put another lathe in my current shop.

My mill is a Chinese Milldrill and I'm sorry I invested in it. Turned down an old Bridgeport without power feed shortly after purchasing it and truly regret the decision. In my humble opinion The old lathes and mills with all of their iron mass outperform the newer and too light imports. Also the machining even with broken gears is vastly suprerior. I've had my Harbour Freight gear driven mill/drill apart and cleaned the sand from its innards as well as tried to tune the much less than precision fit gears. However, I'm still left with a less than adequate machine that will never have the beef or the precision to match a knee mill.

While the lathes are o.k, I still wish I had the mass which ultimately will help maintain accuracy far better than what is available to hobby types like myself now.

Anyway that's my two cents worth.
Jim

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Contact Monarch, they are still in business. I called awhile back to get some info on my 18.5"x54" lathe, and the rep told me "Just so you know, if you ever need any part for that lathe we can get it to you. We still have all of the blueprints. It won't be cheap, but we can do it." My lathe was made in 1946. Give them a shot.

Jim S, all of that mass does help a lot. My small lathe (the one mentioned here)weighs 5,200#. Sink a tool bit in .500", give it .015" feed, and stand back. These lathes, if taken care of, will last for generations.

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Contact Monarch, they are still in business. I called awhile back to get some info on my 18.5"x54" lathe, and the rep told me "Just so you know, if you ever need any part for that lathe we can get it to you. We still have all of the blueprints. It won't be cheap, but we can do it." My lathe was made in 1946. Give them a shot.


Big Gun Doc - I tried that... they said "no info available" unless I talked with a guy that just didn't want to talk about a 1920's old pile of iron? - JK
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Here is my 1935 9" Southbend lathe 48" bed. This lathe was purchased by my grandfather. I have all the original paper work fot the lathe including shipping lables manuals catalogs. I also have a old note book that my grandfather recorded each job he did and how much he for them. First job was on Feb 18 1935 turned an armiture for 25 cents. He ran a small fix it shop in Cook, Nebraska for 50 years. He once recieved a letter that was addressed "To the man in Cook that can fix anything except the crack of dawn or abroken heart" and it went straigth to my grandfather.

I just moved the lathe to my shop a couple of months ago and have used it a little but should take some classes to really learn how to use it.

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I found and rebuilt this older vintage SB. Had to fabricate the motor tensioning mechanism and refinish the frame. She runs true and has very little play in the head stock. Also included was old model skinner 3 jaw chuck. She spent most of here previous live in the celler of mans home that ran a dairy farm near the coast in Maine. I had to take it apart to get it through the cellar door and into the truck (heavy).

I put some pics in the gallery but it is not up and running yet.

Photos attached.

Peter

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This is my 1960's vintage Lodge and Shipley 14.4" x 56" lathe. Originally had a motor-generator variable speed DC drive. When I got it, the original drive was gone, replace with 70's Reliance Electric drive that was smoked. It also had a hydraulic tracer. I stripped about 2500# of useless drive motor and tracer, then was patient while searching for a drive. It now has a mechanical vari speed drive. By the way, I moved the lathe 32' into the shop, turned it 90 degrees and then 4' more, by myself. took 4 hours.

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