arftist

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About arftist

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  1. It isn't cast iron. 7018 Will work fine, 6010 will work but not as easy as 7018.
  2. What was he doing that you felt was unsafe with a flap wheel?
  3. JY; that is why a heating torch should be constantly moving.
  4. Induction coils can be customized to very precise small heats and much faster than a torch.
  5. Black Creek Cast iron
  6. Main selling point is that they are not made from grey cast iron but rather they are made from ductile iron. I will leave it you to figure out the difference. The second selling point is the fully enclosed screw. Both point lead to better longevity and indeed they are the best and most expensive vises on the market.
  7. Ashman; you need to send all the flux off but it is not needed to get all the solder off. I would sand till you can see some brass through the solder.
  8. Most chucks can be removed by a pair of wedges which can be purchased from a machinery supplier.
  9. Using a drill press mount work securely. Drill 1/64" underside hole. Ream. You may find acceptable results from simply using a new drill bit.
  10. Or have one of your grandchildren proof read for You. You don't think the compressive force of impact is involved in anvil sway?
  11. Actually small angle can be bed frame which is mostly med-high carbon.
  12. This is a good example of why reinventing the wheel is a waste of time for most people. For the best possible geometry the spring should lie flat...the rollers can be much tighter and the possibility of flinging the hammer out of the guide is nil.
  13. I have seen something very similar, maybe Basher?
  14. 2nd everything Marc said. I just picked up a Lincoln Square Wave 200. It runs on 110 or 220. It will weld bronze all day long, so I know it will weld aluminum (preheat required for thicker sections.) It is unlikely that I will ever use the 110 cord unless I have to do a small stainless repair in a commercial kitchen or something else requiring very little amps.