Glenn

Show me your Forge

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firebug, nice looking forge need to resize pictures, it would be easier to view. Once you start using the forge you'll be able to tell if you forgot any thing.



Do you know if I can resize the existing photos without having to totally redo the post?

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I thought about a speed control and actually had a place for one but was told I could not use it on the 115 volt motor with a capacitor starter on it. Does anyone know if this is true or not. I would like to use a speed control if possible. If I cannot do it I have very good control with the gate valve. THANKS for the input.



Reinforces my choice to use 12v DC. Better than having 240V near really hot things and can run off a car battery if needed. What is the noise like on a blower like that?

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Reinforces my choice to use 12v DC. Better than having 240V near really hot things and can run off a car battery if needed. What is the noise like on a blower like that?



It is VERY quiet and smooth. It was about 90.00 at Grainger.

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It is VERY quiet and smooth. It was about 90.00 at Grainger.


The only thing I didn't see was the tachometer, oil pressure and temp gauges.

Seriously, the only two things I would do, are to add an adjustable flap over the inlet of your blower motor, and re-arange your ash dump so you can adjust it open a little as an excess air dump. Between these two little mods, you don't need a motor controller. Nice job, looks very convenient.

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The only thing I didn't see was the tachometer, oil pressure and temp gauges.

Seriously, the only two things I would do, are to add an adjustable flap over the inlet of your blower motor, and re-arange your ash dump so you can adjust it open a little as an excess air dump. Between these two little mods, you don't need a motor controller. Nice job, looks very convenient.


Artist,

I have a sliding gate valve in front of the blower to adjust the airflow just before it enters the fire pot. The lever that the horse head is attached to is the adjustment for air flow. It works very well. I figure this would be better than restricting air intake which in theory anyway, would help keep the motor cooler. I know the best solution would be to put a speed control on it to keep from loading the fan up with back pressure. But, these fans are not positive displacement and don't build a lot of pressure anyway. I figure this fan will last me for MANY, MANY years.
Thank you for the input. Getting ready to head back out to the shop to work on it. I have a few more additions to it.

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Actualy restricting the air inlet keeps the motor cooler. Choking down the flow after the blower causes the motor has to work harder.

Additionaly, most motor controllers cause the motor to work harder as well, thereby limiting the lifespan of the motor.

Both my gasser (Johnson) and my solid fuel forge (shopbuilt) are rigged this way and have many, many years on the original motors. Neither has a motor speed contoller, both have very good air controll.

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Firebug, May I suggest a branch or "T" on the air pipe from the fan to the fire. This should be controlled with a sliding gate or whatever. The end of the pipe should be aimed TOWARD the blacksmith. It will vent any extra air not needed by the fire and give you a place where you can take one step amd be in a nice breeze during the heat of the forge session.

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Glenn (as usual) is right. I think it was Grant Sarver (Nakedanvil) who gave me the idea to try this a while ago. I found a hand dryer blower and I've been using it for charcoal for a while. It blows a lot of air so I use it as in picture 3 with that end pointing at me so I get all the air and the charcoal gets, still a lot of it.

Hope it helps...

Rubén

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my scrap built forge threw together in an an hour or so couldn't wait to get started.

first pic is just of the ash dump.

second pic is my electric blower with dimmer switch to control air flow.

third pic is the forge itself with A butchered air compressor tank as a quench tank

I built this from scrap box section 40x40 and 30x30

angle iron 30x30x5

plate steel fire pot and base

and ash dump and air inlet was 40mm tube
sorry dont know how to resize the pics.

Please also bear in mind i can weld but i only had a little suitcase welder available at the time and the power supply were i live is not great.

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Firebug, May I suggest a branch or "T" on the air pipe from the fan to the fire. This should be controlled with a sliding gate or whatever. The end of the pipe should be aimed TOWARD the blacksmith. It will vent any extra air not needed by the fire and give you a place where you can take one step amd be in a nice breeze during the heat of the forge session.


This seems to be a good idea. I painted the forge today but can still incorporate this.

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Firebug,
“Only because you ask for suggestions”

On some of the coal forges that I have used over the years, I never liked it when black water (coal dust and water mixed) that was created from sprinkling water on my coal would sometime escape in-between the lips of the firepot and the forge table, and would then drip down onto my feet.

As a solution, I welded in a peace of ½’ round stock that surrounds the fire pot kind of like a dam. The weld should be continuous so water cannot seep out under the lips of the fire pot.
The fire pot sits in its normal position and is un-effected by the round stock surround. It just keeps the water from dripping out onto your feet.

It know that it may be to late to make other suggestions, so I will leave it at this!
It looks to me like you have covered a lot of bases with your design.

Keep up the good work!

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Firebug, May I suggest a branch or "T" on the air pipe from the fan to the fire. This should be controlled with a sliding gate or whatever. The end of the pipe should be aimed TOWARD the blacksmith. It will vent any extra air not needed by the fire and give you a place where you can take one step amd be in a nice breeze during the heat of the forge session.



Glenn,

I have been giving it some thought and I know how I can do this. I will fabricate a vent kind of like a BBQ vent that is adjustable from 0 to almost full open and vent it towards me. I will locate the vent just under the outside perimeter of the forge so I can reach it by hand. I can use a 3" hole saw to drill a hole just before the gate valve that is located ahead of the fire pot. It will act sort of like a pressure relief valve when I close the gate valve at the fire pot to lower the fire in the forge. I will keep ya'll up to date.

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25782_364048193879_619893879_3718921_11925782_364048178879_619893879_3718920_22925782_364048173879_619893879_3718919_11825782_364048163879_619893879_3718918_11425782_364048153879_619893879_3718917_73425782_364048143879_619893879_3718916_336This is my new compact portable brake drum forge. I built it this week and LOVE it so far!

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A Jeep in the background and a hairdryer duct taped for a fan... YOU SIR are a man after my own heart!

And I would like to personally thank all of you for the great pictures and the inspiration to go out and build my own brake drum forge, I would also like to thank you all for the nights I will spend on the couch, after ignoring my wife for too long at the forge. :D

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Stainless wouldn't stand up much better at those temps. Iron is iron and it would still be eaten away. On the metalcasting forums almost everyone at one time or another has the great idea to use stainless steel crucibles of some type or another. They wear out just as fast if not faster. Stainless is not a miracle substance, its properties are more or less the same as other steels.

Yes, I have had the thought ever since I started looking at this forum that it would be neat to replicate old blowers and other parts for folks. I re-discovered an old technique that makes casting things like blower shells fairly simple. If there is interest maybe I will sell the raw castings so those who would like to could build their own blower. Maybe even personalized with their forge name.. Hmm. This is what the raw castings of the sides of that blower looked like fresh out of the sand. They are a little rough, this is the first attempt at casting them. The thing in the middle is the impeller.

Hey there, I also am abit south of Mt Katadin. New Sharon actually. It might be interesting for some members of my groupe to have access to blower castings. I'm a member of Western Maine Blacksmith Assoc. Let me know if you're going through with casting them. Thanks. Stan [email protected]

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Bought it at an antique shop for $250.00. Seemed kinda steep but it worked and the gears looked pristine. The anvil I bought from Harbor Freight.

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Bought it at an antique shop for $250.00. Seemed kinda steep but it worked and the gears looked pristine. The anvil I bought from Harbor Freight.


How long ago did you buy your HF anvil? Is it the cast steel 110 #er? Even though I have a very nice Trenton, I still want one of those Russki anvils :D
Scott

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PICT32311.jpgPICT32211-1.jpg Charcoal forge made from a discarded barbeque grill; adobe lining, hair dryer for a blower. Can cook your steak after you are done forging. :P
PS this was a while back before i had some mentoring; I have and can make real tongs now and don't wear my welding gloves to hold stuff anymore. I moved into another place and converted the 2 car garage into my shop, and I have 2 propane forges these days as well. This forge was the first and cost about $10 to make.

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Heres ours. Fire pot is 3/8" plate and "floats" in the table.Table and hood are 1/8".. Champion blower taken off the stand. Forged a swing out arm for it. Just need to change the chimney pipe to 10"..Hood pulls good but the 6" is too small and cant 100% of the handle green coal smoke and I knew it starting out but its all I had at the time..As soon as the snow melts off for a day or two Im changing it out to 10" pipe..Oh and thats a wrought iron(1075 bit) axe head setting there waiting to be stamped and heat treated :P
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Bought it at an antique shop for $250.00. Seemed kinda steep but it worked and the gears looked pristine. The anvil I bought from Harbor Freight.


Wow that is almost exactly the forge I have. Champion rivet forge. My blower is just a little different in how it pipped to the tuyere but same model.


Brian pierson

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It's not much but it works! Started with a old homemade steel charcoal grill, a break drum, some scrap pipe and a use water heater blower. Probably not the prettiest forge in the world but if I'm not careful I can melt the end of 1" key stock.

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It's not much but it works! Started with a old homemade steel charcoal grill, a break drum, some scrap pipe and a use water heater blower. Probably not the prettiest forge in the world but if I'm not careful I can melt the end of 1" key stock.

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How long ago did you buy your HF anvil? Is it the cast steel 110 #er? Even though I have a very nice Trenton, I still want one of those Russki anvils :D
Scott


I noticed that anvil as well. It's not the same ASO I bought from Harbor Freight back in the early 90s. This one actually looks like an anvil should. And quick60 congrats on the forge, it's a beauty.

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