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Hello guys i want to have a Foundry with propane that can melt cast iron or steel. I thougt of buying a foundry like devil forge ones but i dont know if they are hot enough. Or how can i build it ? DO i need forced air burner? 

The molt what can i use for it. Normal green sand?

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Devil forge is not a foundry, and with the questions you are asking I am not sure its safe for you to  build a foundry,   Iron is not a starting place for casting. and furnaces are disposable items. Forced air is a good idea

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Whatever steel you start with, the best you are going to come out with is poor quality cast iron. The only way to counteract this is to use a sealed crucible, and you probably aren't going to pour it into anything.

Cast iron is no joke safety wise, it's an order of magnitude hotter than copper when the iron is at pouring temp, and tends to spatter when spilled. Steel would need to be poured somewhere around 3000F, so even hotter than you would pour cast iron. You will need some seriously upgraded safety gear. And, even though propane can get to cast iron temps, it's not the most efficient way to do it. You are going to go through a lot of propane for not a very large melt.

Unless you want to make small amounts of crucible steel for whatever purpose, I would forget about casting steel in a home foundry. I'm willing to bet that almost all hobby foundries lack the necessary fine control and metallurgy requirements to get a known, useable steel. I'm positive I couldn't do it in mine. Steel is not practical or realistic for a home foundry. 

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Why do you assume that higher carbon means better quality? Using that thought, cast iron is a very high quality steel indeed! (Do you put gasoline in a diesel engine because it's "better quality"? More refined, higher octane,...)

Yes; you can alloy your own steel; however there is a lot more to it than just adding carbon.  For instance when you melt steel the melt will start to gain or lose various elements due to contact with the atmosphere, slag, refractories, etc.  You may want to read up on folks making their own Wootz.

A lower temp example is melting brass where the zinc starts to burn out of the melt at pouring temps and has to be restored.

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