lyndon2472

Anvil weights by dimension

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This has prob been mentioned before my apologies (im new ) 

i had a reference page a year ago that had a list of anvil weights by dimension, it was a rough guide of course but i have lost it and have been trying for weeks to re-discover the page.

It was literally a list of dimensions and weights corresponding to those dimensions , i am still trying to buy more anvils from that ****** auction site and of course no one knows the weights of the ones they are selling , does anyone know the page i am talking about or have a link to one similar ?  its driving me mad atm im trying to guess weights by memory or comparison to my 544 lb one which is a strain to say the least. 

Edited by Moderator54
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If you go to Texas Farrier Supply's website they list anvils by weight & dimensions.  Maybe that helps.

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this was a chart I turned up while I was rabidly looking for info on a potential anvil to purchase, it is 'calibrated' (shall we say) for brooks/Vaughn models, but it would probably be a pretty good starting point for other manufactures with similar proportions.

 

http://anvils.co.uk/images/uploaded/ANVILS_DATA.pdf

 

my 45kg brooks matches almost exactly (as you would expect) but my hardie is 5/8 instead of 3/4 :(

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Such charts will get you moderate accuracy for weight, but there have been so many makers producing so many styles of anvils for so long that a truly accurate chart would be very hard to come by.   Different makers produced anvils with dissimilar proportions. They also changed features such as hole sizes (often to order).  The same brand name and weight of anvil often changed proportion over the years.  

 

Make good things on your anvil and the type and size will be less important.  

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A general-reference chart will be helpful as long as you split it between the two main types of anvils.  Vulcan and Fisher both tend to have thicker waists and heels than Wright and the like.  Even though they're the same height, the Fisher could be significantly heavier because there's more metal in that height.

 

Still, not a bad idea to have cheat sheet when looking at anvils on the internet.  

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Having a ball park guesstimate is a whole lot better than an eyeball guess. So it isn't exact, bring a bathroom scale, two if it looks to be more than say 400lbs. Lay a borad between them tare it and EASE the anvil on the board.

 

A balance is really easy to make, all you need is a stout board, a fulcrum, piece of pipe works very nicely and gallon jugs of water. Water weighs 8.33lbs./gl. A plastic jug is pretty insignificant but you can set an empty on the anvil for every full one you put in the balance.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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For a london Pattern anvil try this.

It will give you the demensions +/- 15lbs

L=Lenth

H=height

M=Mass

L+H-110=M

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For a london Pattern anvil try this.

It will give you the demensions +/- 15lbs

L=Lenth

H=height

M=Mass

L+H-110=M

 

I'm not seeing how this works.... 

Maybe your plus sign is supposed to be a multiplication sign?

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using addition mine goes negative, multiplication I get 75 (25 short of 100)

 

interesting simplified equation though :)

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I'm not seeing how this works.... 

Maybe your plus sign is supposed to be a multiplication sign?

Yes, that should be L*H-110=M

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I like to ask potential sellers some measurements before I make a drive..I have never and I mean never went to look at an anvil that was "guestamated" for weight that was even close..200 pounders turned out to 100 pounders and 400 pounders turned out to be 200 pounders..

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cross thread quoting here, i like the method that Thomas Powers shared in an anvil ID thread from 2011:

 

 

I also never believed a description either on a listing or over a phone: "Heavy or large anvils" were often under 100 pounds. I did work out a method to filter auctions on: I would ask how many people it took to lift the anvil to the selling platform---1 = = light anvil, 2 = = light to medium (150# tops), Forklift/tractor/crane = = attend auction!

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Now I am quoting myself. I know I am in trouble.

 

"This is a case where basic math is your friend. You can figure it out with a steel tape, pencil, paper, and the calculator on your phone. One cubic foot of iron or steel is 500 pounds, pretty close. So, 12 x 12 x 12 equals 1728 cubic inches. 500 divided by 1728 equals .289 pounds per cubic inch, so each 3 cubic inches is about one pound."

 

Depends upon the size of the person doing the lifting.

 

"Yes, folks are terrible about guesstimating weights. Some guy at work was telling me about this huge anvil his uncle had that was so big than two men could not lift it, so I lugged my two hundred pound Hay-Budden over and set it down. He choked, and allowed as how that was even bigger than the one his Uncle had! (I was not about to go get the 150Kg Euroanvil, just as long, but much heavier.) The advantages of being a reformed caber-tosser."

 

I don't always toss tree trunks around, but when I do, I wear a Hunting McPherson kilt. Slainte' Mhor, my friends.

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I drove over two hours once for a "perfect condition 400# colonial style anvil" that turned out to be about 200# missing about 1/4 of the faceplate..The seller was a tool collector and a serious one at that..I took his work without measurements..

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Does that formula work for metric?  Angstroms?  What are the units!

 

My 410# Trenton is much longer and taller than my 515# Fisher  Anvil dimensions are very dependent on the style of anvil with short squat english anvils being quite different than elongated american anvils

 

I once started collecting all the dimensions on anvils I have owned but gave it up as a loosing proposition as they didn't seem to correlate---like my 195#  swell horned farriers anvil with a 3" wide face vs a 93# london pattern with a 4" face... 

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Does that formula work for metric?  Angstroms?  What are the units!

 

My 410# Trenton is much longer and taller than my 515# Fisher  Anvil dimensions are very dependent on the style of anvil with short squat english anvils being quite different than elongated american anvils

 

I once started collecting all the dimensions on anvils I have owned but gave it up as a loosing proposition as they didn't seem to correlate---like my 195#  swell horned farriers anvil with a 3" wide face vs a 93# london pattern with a 4" face... 

L*H-110=M

 

Most anvils in my area are Peter Wrights, so it is used for Peter Wright London Blacksmith Pattern anvils. The formula has worked for the 3-4 anvils I have test it on within a 15lb range.

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Still need to state units to be used as that doesn't work out the same way using angstroms and is different for mm, cm,m which is what most of the people in the world use.

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L*H-110=M

 

Most anvils in my area are Peter Wrights, so it is used for Peter Wright London Blacksmith Pattern anvils. The formula has worked for the 3-4 anvils I have test it on within a 15lb range.

 

It may work for smaller (?) anvils.  For a check, Matchless Antiques  conveniently lists all dimensions in the Ebay auctions, as do some other listings for anvils.

I looked back through several completed listings, and this equation worked for most (not all) anvils under 150# within +/- 15#. 

 

But several (not all) over 150# I grabbed were quite a bit off:

 

148# Hay-Budden 26-1/2" x 11", equation indicates this would be 181 pounds.

155# Trenton 29" x 11", equation says 209 pounds.

223# Peter Wright 29-1/2" x 12-1/4", equation says 251 pounds.

169# Peter Wright 26-1/2" x 11-3/4", equation says 201 pounds.

200# Fisher 28-1/2" x 11-7/8", equation says 228 pounds.

169# Hay Budden 26-1/2" x11-3/4", equation says 201 pounds.

 

In my posession at the moment is a 212# PW, 29" x 12", equation says 238#.

Just sayin'.... Maybe not the most reliable method for larger anvils.

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On the other hand if you are fishing in the dark with someone not able or willing to lift the anvil on a scale it will least get you in the "small, medium or large ballpark"  Though I would like to see what the formula says for Pep's 750# West anvil...

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Oh I agree, use every tool you can to help out when estimating.

I just didn't want someone reading this to assume it works all the time, and then be way off for size and/or pricing by the pound. Sometimes by 30% in that Trenton example....


Oh I agree, use every tool you can to help out when estimating.

I just didn't want someone reading this to assume it works all the time, and then be way off for size and/or pricing by the pound. Sometimes by 30% in that Trenton example.... 30% off of a 300# anvil gives you a 200# to 400# window. Quite a range there.

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this was a chart I turned up while I was rabidly looking for info on a potential anvil to purchase, it is 'calibrated' (shall we say) for brooks/Vaughn models, but it would probably be a pretty good starting point for other manufactures with similar proportions.

 

http://anvils.co.uk/images/uploaded/ANVILS_DATA.pdf

 

my 45kg brooks matches almost exactly (as you would expect) but my hardie is 5/8 instead of 3/4 :(

that is the exact one i had before !!!! t Thank you  i feel whole again lol !

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Thanks folks got my answer and a few more , the reason i wanted this is i am looking for anvils on ebay still and people haven't got a clue they think the word "heavy" covers it , last time i turned up to see an anvil in my tiny little car it was over 500 lb !!! and was strapped to a JCB front arm to move it lol

 

this is a classic example of an anvil for sale in the uk http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Old-English-Traditional-Vintage-Blacksmiths-Anvil-on-Stand-with-Stakes-USED-/221277041275

even company,s selling them are to lazy to find out how heavy they are.

 

My current anvil is 544 lb and is a nightmare to move even inches its an ISSAC HILL from 1835-1850 and came from a lunatic asylum in Bridgend South Wales its a great story but unfortunately i may have to sell it and move to a smaller one just to get some cash to pay for my collage course...i start Monday  (gulp )

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Hey guys. Looking at a Fisher stamped 1942, no other signs aside from a riveted “Property of Defense Corp” under what I believe to be the stamped eagle. 34” total length, 14” high, and a 5 3/4” face width. Have a good idea the weight is over 300#, appears to be in good condition. Painted. Wear and tear, minimal pitting on thick face, all there. Wondering if anyone is familiar with these, possibly a more specific weight, and fair price. I’m in the Northeast but have a 3 1/2 hour drive to get there. Thanks! I’ll try to get a picture for you..

 

 

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