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What is the best way to find quality anvils at an affordable price


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Welcome aboard Blake, gad to have you. If you'll put your general location in the header you might be surprised how many of the gang live within visiting distance and how it cuts down on the local Viking's snappy remarks. It's noting personal he's working towards his curmudgeon 01 badge.

What do you mean by "some luck" regarding finding anvils in your locale. WhereEVER that might be? Condition, size prices of the some luck anvils? 

Frosty The Lucky.

 

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Sorry Blake, the edit function only works for something like half an hour after you post. Don't sweat it, just give us some details, we'll stop teasing you. It's a curmudgeon thing, we're actually pretty darned helpful we just need some info.

Editing your profile on the other hand is pretty easy. Click on your name or Avatar and at the upper right of the page that comes up you'll find an "Edit Profile" button. select it, edit your profile and save.

Frosty The Lucky.

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You're smack dab in the middle of good anvil country. Anvils are like spiders, you're almost never more than a few feet from one but the sit very still, especially when you're searching for them! Follow the TPAAAT advice and be patient. Also be warned, as soon as you pay top dollar for a so so anvil a truly magnificent one will become available at a good price. Never fails. They also get easier to find in general once you have a good one. Farm auctions have never been my favorite way to shop but it all depends on who shows up on any given day. Put the word out with everyone you come in contact with. If you have a business card hand write "want's anvil" on the back of them and hand them out. Tell the guys at you're local scrap yard to call you if anything anvil shaped comes over the scales. Six packs of cold beverages strategically delivered to garages and shops along with word you're looking for an anvil can shake cobwebs loose. If a machine shop or garage has twelve cars in the lot and a waiting room full of customers come back when nobody is there. No one wants to do you a favor when they are up to there eyeballs in work. Figure out where all the farmers congregate for coffee and complaining about the price of corn or hogs or whatever they grow, (every town in the Midwest has the local farmer hang out) and tell them what you want. If you don't have an anvil or three by now you just haven't talked to enough people yet. Also, this may involve you knocking on a strangers door in which case you should use your own judgment but if you can get the info from them your garbage man and your mail carrier and power company guys know what's in every yard in your county. Coin laundries are a good place to advertise when you want to buy something because anyone in a coin laundry wishes they had money to buy their own washing machine. The more I think about it I'm pretty sure I could find an anvil in your town in a week or two! Good luck and happy hunting! -M-

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1 hour ago, TwistedCustoms said:

Figure out where all the farmers congregate for coffee and complaining

Here we call that the liars table...

One time we were having breakfast at the bowling alley and there was a newcomer  there from Texas. He said he just bought a farm north of town and asked what the best crop there was. One of the old farmers said Texans, seems he had sold his farm several times (owner financing) to Texans and had to repossess when they went broke.

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The Thomas Powers method has worked for me before I knew it had a name. The hardest part is being patient. 

The only other piece of advice I’ve got is don’t be afraid to start small and start trading up as they come available. If you follow the TPAAAT, they’ll keep finding you after you’ve already got one. There’s no shame and buying low and making money when you sell to work your way to your dream anvil. 

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Everyone is right who has posted so far.  It took me over a year to find a good anvil and it was a friend of a friend's nephew.  He ended up having 10 of them to pick from.  My German Trenton ended up following me home from a trailer out in back of his house.  He lifted the tarp and there was a coiled up snake guarding one of the Mouse Hole's there so I decided on the Trenton.  

Make sure you read EVERYTHING on this forum about anvils.  You'll get little tips and tid bits from all the threads that will help you not to overpay and not to come home with a crappy anvil.  Really word of mouth is the best method.  I struck-out for a long time and then bam! I get the tip that leads me to 10 anvils to pick from along with 2 buckets of tongs, a pile of hardy tools, and a bucket of hammers.

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10 hours ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

One time we were having breakfast at the bowling alley and there was a newcomer  there from Texas. He said he just bought a farm north of town and asked what the best crop there was. One of the old farmers said Texans, seems he had sold his farm several times (owner financing) to Texans and had to repossess when they went broke.

So, a Vermont farmer is walking along the road when a Texan pulls up in a big, shiny pickup truck and asks, "Hey, old timer! How much land you got here?" The farmer rubs his chin and embarks on a lengthy description of the boundary markers on his property, some dating back to colonial times, finishing up with, "So, I guess about two hundred, forty-seven acres." The Texan laughs and says, "Well, down in Texas, I got me a spread, and I can get in my truck and drive all day without coming to one of my borders." The Vermonter nods knowingly and says, "Oh, yeah. I had a truck like that once."

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Which is why Ohio is richer in anvils than places like New Mexico. In Ohio you may have 4 farms per section each one having a small anvil for basic fix-it work---Remember Sears Roebuck's motto "Every Farmer their own Smith".   While in New Mexico the ranch may be 100+ sections and you still had 1 anvil per ranch.  Ranch anvils also tend to be "rode hard and put away wet".

Ohio also had a lot of industry back in the 19th century and industry back in the 19th century often involved a lot of anvils.  I'm always puzzled by folks asking about old tools "Was it made by a blacksmith or made in a factory?"  Sorry but that is not a dichotomy back then!

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Tangles - for sure man, there's 9 of them still there last I knew.  With prices so high I'm almost tempted to buy a few more, clean them up and resell them for a profit.  Stop.....anvil time :D

Yup, here in NY our snakes are mostly safe, but he was a feisty bugger for not having fangs or a rattler.  I took it as a hint to take the Trenton.  He probably read "M-O-U-S-E" on the side and thought he'd found his honey hole for food.

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