ohowson

Forge welding end to flat

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I'm very much a novice, but I have a few relatively basic projects in my mind. One thing I want to do is to forge weld a hoop or hasp end-on to a bit of flat bar. 

Let's see if I can ASCII-art this one....

Ok so that looks dodgier than I intended - but hopefully makes sense - with the hasp standing up from the flat bar and the two ends (marked by Xs) forge welded. 

         ____
        /    \
    /===|====|========================/
   /    |    |                       /
  /     X    X                      /
 /                                 /
/=================================/

Am I flogging a dead horse with this? Should I just arc weld them (I don't have a MIG) and then do some heating and battering to make sure they look forged?

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drill holes at each 'X'  then taper the ends of the hasp section.  then after heating to temp, its easier to forge weld the junction of the taper to hole, than it would have been on the flat.  Then  grind off the protrusion on the reverse side when finished

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       |  |
        \/
=======    ======

Like this? Then push it through? And I'd have to hit in the angle? I think that may be a bit beyond my skills at the moment but I'm willing to give it a go!

Thinking more before anyone gets chance to respond: Is the hole *narrower* than the hasp and I hammer on the top of the U of the hasp to drive it down and weld it? That would be MAD clever! 

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hole is smaller than diameter of hasp shaft, larger than pointed tip, and hit straight down oforging both sides of hasp into the holes at once

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You could tenon them in like a rivet after you set a shoulder on each arm of the hasp and pien the ends that stick through the holes.

Pnut

 

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Jump weld.  Not a beginner's method as it's tricky getting differing sizes up to forge welding temps at the same time.

If the back won't be visible, drill, insert and arc weld on the backside, do a good bevel and you can even grind it flat afterwards.

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If you don't want to forge or arc weld you could treat the two ends of the loop as rivet heads by inserting through the holes in the bar and peening them over from the back side.  It may be sufficient and easier than welding.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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OR you can bend the ends (x) 90* for a short length say 1/2" and forge braze them. Forge welding feet is easier than jump welding but you still have the issue of getting all the pieces to welding temperature in a controlled manner. 

What George is calling Riveting is what others have called mortise and tenon, specifically a peined mortise and tenon join. Steve's suggestion is a welded mortise tenon join.

What you want to do isn't a beginner's join but it's a worthy challenge. I suggest you experiment with scrap until you get the hang of it. Keep us in the loop please.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Now how much force will this hasp see in use?  That will affect suggested methods.

(And Yes, the mad clever  is correct.)  

We haven't even mentioned heat shrinking it or explosive welding...

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I wouldn't forge weld it.

call it a rivet or a mortise and tenon, this is how I do them. I will add counter sinking the hole on the backside. Then if needed, it will be flush on the backside. 

 

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