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have a 4th axis ( rotary table for a cnc mill ) and it has a few screws missing or damaged

it is made in the US and is a HAAS HRT 310, it is recent and not an antique so can anyone tell me what threads are likely to be used

the main one I need is about 3/16", measured at 0.186" or 4.7mm on the outside of the male thread and is quite fine.

another thread of interest is the one for the lifting eye, measures about 7/16" and looks like our whitworth or UNC thread

it weighs 438 pounds

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We use all kinds of threads, depending on the year and manufacture. ASE corse and fine threads were classics, the will have the classic 3 or 6. / marks pointing to the center. Metric fasteners will have fine and corse as well and have a number denoting grade.  I would have to look up a TPI or TPMM chart to give you spacific thread counts. We have been dealing with a mix of threads for years, in the late 80’s it wasn’t uncommon to have American made cars have metric and standard faseners

 

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I know it is not metric, looks very similar to m5 but is just a little smaller and about the same pitch, the screws are a bit short to count the tpi on

I think the item was made about 2008

casing damaged so had to remove it to bash out dents

http://int.haascnc.com/we_spec1.asp?intLanguageCode=1033&id=HRT310&sizeID=310MM_ROTARY

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What did they say when you contacted customer support?

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not contacted them yet, some places are not happy to help when you got a few thousand $ worth of their kit from a scrapyard or they want you to only have it fixed at their authorised dealers for a lot of money

 

an induction heater I bought for 10 uk pounds, the makers want me to pay them over 500 uk pounds so they can inspect it and test it before they supply me with a spare part costing a few pounds

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A # 10 screw is .190" dia so that might be what the 3/16" actually is.  Comes in both 24 and 32 TPI standard.

As to the 7/16", standard for that is either 14 or 20 TPI depending in whether it's NC or NF.  Or of course it might be an oddball.

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Tell them you recently bought it used and when it arrived to your shop it was missing a couple of screws.  Good customer service would ship you a handful at no charge. Decent would tell you what they are; bad wont; but you don't know till you ask.  If talking to them doesn't work then asking the world might work.

Have you asked on homeshopmachinist.net?

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this is my first place to look TP

will look at the small screw again in the morning Kozzy as #10 32 sounds likely

can get them locally but not at 21.45 on a friday nite but at least I have a starting point, thanks to all

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I've just found a PDF user manual with dra ing and parts list, I think will supply the sizes you need to know. I'll pm you a link.

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Smoggy,

Thank you.

SLAG.

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Sounds like a #10-32 machine screw. A note for repairs. When I worked at the Jelly Belly Candy Co we had some machines that used #10-32 screws in them. If one got stripped out you could thread in a M5 screw and get it to grab as the M5 is .010" larger in diameter and the pitch of the threads match up. Many times this kept production going until we could repair it in the shop.

 

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got the details and ordered the screws

got 4 of the 1/4 here the tread is known as UNC and 20 of the smaller ones which is here known as UNF, each of which used to be common here before metric took over

thank you guys

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