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I had just recently began blacksmithing using an A.s.o when I went to visit my great uncle who is a wood worker and ran across his yard art anvil I asked him how much he told me to take it, I have been looking all over for information on it but I have found nothing I know it is a Trenton it has "solid" on it and 131 stamped in the front but nothing else found something on the internet claiming it is a Germany model that matches my markings perfect. I have searched all over the anvil these are the only markings on it. This is one from an online ad, as my camera doesn't work too well.  Any help would be so appreciated thanks Brandon  

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8 hours ago, Brandon G Valdez said:

Any help would be so appreciated thanks Brandon 

Welcome to the forum Brandon. If you go to your profile and add your location you may be surprised how many of the gang are near you and many times answers are location dependent.

Without pictures of your anvil it's hard to give much information on it however Trenton anvils are top notch, if they haven't been abused or ruined in a fire.

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Frosty   

Welcome aboard Brandon, glad to have you. Dito putting your general location in the header. Every hour you can spend with an experienced blacksmith is worth days of trying to figure it out yourself.

We need pics of YOUR anvil to oping about it. Otherwise all we can do is give broad generalizations about Trentons. They're top shelf anvils provided they haven't been: abused, damaged, "repaired," etc.

That's about all we can say till we know more.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Charcold   

I can say one thing for sure, glad you've rescued an anvil from the dreaded yard art category. If yours is anywhere near as solid as the one pictured that is. 

On my local craigslist right now there are 3-4 anvils that are terribly damaged that would make a much better lawn ornament than a fully functional Trenton! 

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Daswulf   

Nothing a little wire wheel work can't clean up. Can't see the face but it looks to be in good condition. Clean up the face by hammering some hot steel on it and your good to go. Nice find for free! Trentons are great anvils. 

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Looks like a german Trenton to me with the step on the feet and the hourglass on the bottom (both commonly found on other brands but NOT at the same time!---step Peter Wright and hourglass Hay Budden)

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Frosty   

Thanks for the pics Brandon and thank you for rescuing that fine old lady from the garden! She's seen too many years in the weather but the edges look pretty good which is a good sign. How does the face look? Please PLEASE don't take a grinder to the face. There is only SO MUCH steel face and once it's gone it's gone for good. 

Carefully take a wire wheel or cup brush to her to dust off the rust. When I say carefully I mean be careful for YOU. Dangerous things disk grinders with wire wheels, cup brushes. Hammering hot steel on her will put a proper shine on her face in short order. If you wish to protect her from rust there are a number of good finishes. My personal favorite is Trewax, carnuba paste furniture, floor wax. It's the stuff they armor bowling alleys with. Bowling Alley Wax is another similar product. Boiled linseed oil is a good choice as is LPS 3 spray preservative. Heck, you can even paint it if you'd like and listen to the howls of outraged "traditionalists". That can be fun. :P

Terrific score! I'm suffering anvil envy now but I won't hate you for it, you're going to put her back to work. Kudos!

Frosty The Lucky.

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Hey I'd love to see an anvil with a scene from the Hylestad Stave Church door carvings painted on the sides!

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Yep great find indeed. When you get to wire brushing the rust look on the foot under the horn for a serial number. Also try a rebound and ring test on the face. Here is an old thread about Trenton's with some good info. BTW it looks like she weighs 181 pounds.

 

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This is Brandon Valdez I wasn't able to use the same name to log into my account with and email set up. so from now on i will be going off this one, I took your advice and cleaned it up with a wire wheel and the face isn't in the best of shape i am including some photos for you all

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I have searched all over for any  form of other markings but it doesn't seem to have any.

Do you happen to know a rough date of production?

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Frosty   

She's weathered, those are rust pits in the face, it could be worse, a LOT worse. Put her to work. Later, when your skills sets get to a point you can make use of a finely finished anvil face you can make a bottom tool, often called a "hardy" tool. Bottom tools can be any shape or finish you need and we'll help.

Next time you don't need to include all the preceding pictures in a post, hitting quote can be confusing to clean up. Lots of folk on Iforge have dial up connections so we try not to use more bandwidth than necessary. By lots of folk last I heard there are around 45,000 members in 150 countries around the world so yeah, lots is sort of an understatement.

Don't sweat it, you're new here and it's not the simplest forum to navigate or use, we all learn new stuff and some of us have been here a long . . . ish time. 

That's a nice anvil, she has a couple few generations of good work in her now she's been saved from a garden. Thank you.

Frosty The Lucky.

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1 hour ago, BamBamtheboogeyman said:

Sorry about that Frosty I try not to do that again.

The easiest way to quote something with a lot of text or pictures is to highlight the portion you want to quote and a quote this flag pops up. Click on it.

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Frosty   

No, don't apologize, it ain't a thing, this site has a learning curve that keeps changing. It wasn't that long ago the trick Irondragon suggests wasn't an option and you had to quote then delete what you didn't want to post. OR cut and paste what you did want included. There were different options farther back but that was a different OS. 

The serious no nos here are: language, name calling, politics, religion and pictures you wouldn't want to have to explain to your 6 yr. old daughter. The owner and admin want this to be a family friendly site and most of us like the idea. 

You're doing just fine.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

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I have an anvil that was stored for 50 years in a shed in a swampy area near a creek in Ohio; same fine rust pitting on the face.  All I did was to start using it and the hot steel and scale has polished out the sweet spot till it gleams  and is slowly working on the rest of the face.  May I suggest you do likewise?

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2 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

 May I suggest you do likewise?

I have come to the conclusion based on the general consensus of every one on this amazingly friendly and insightful forum, that is what would be the best way to go about it as well thank you Thomas, also i was wondering if you had a guess at how old this is anvil is? if it is really old should i turn it into an ornamental piece and try to find a new anvil.

Edited by BamBamtheboogeyman
added details.

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SLAG   

GYYAAAGH  !!!

BBTB,

Stated,

"if it is really old should I turn it into an ornamental piece and try to find a new anvil?" ,

I believe that the best thing you can do with that anvil is to USE IT!

If not, sell it to someone who will use it.

The museums have their share of anvils.

Anvils, generally, were made to last more than one generation.

That is my belief and opinion, solely.

In the end,

it's your call.

Regards,

SLAG.

 

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Glenn   

Use only tender loving caresses with hot metal and a comfortable weight, well aimed hammer. (grin)

Maybe a light wipe with a little ATF (Auto Transmission Fluid) before you leave the shop.

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ausfire   
12 hours ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

. BTW it looks like she weighs 181 pounds.

Seems more like 131 pounds to me. Maybe I need glasses.

Anyway, really nice anvil. And old doesn't mean fragile. I doubt that any amount of normal work would damage her! Start hammering steel and make her face shine.

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Not that old!  Probably under 150 years old and in good using shape; shoot I use one that is date stamped 1828.  I know folks using anvils made before 1800.  It takes a passel of years for an anvil to be considered "old" to the smithing community!  C1---you got the dates for the German Trentons to hand?.

Now if it was fairly small had visible forge welded sharp narrow feet and a short horn and heel and no pritchel hole; then I'd start to consider it old...

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