Glenn

It followed me home

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I almost forgot the drill, like you said and the 7" grinder, both were black and decker, the drill chuck comes out to a morse taper. I am now selling the 10" southbend and the atlas mill I have now. should break even I think!

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nice scores and nice improvisation Frosty, well done. Were you using a hand held drill before this!??!


Yeah, I was using my 3/8" hand drill with the integral spirit level before. It's a really good way to become familiar with the varying hardnesses to be found in old cast iron. The first 1/4-3/8" where it chilled faster against the mold is harder than . . . Well, it's darned hard and it was tough getting the holes to stay where I wanted them.

This little 1/4" Craftsman turns too fast and complains but it sure beats trying to keep the hole straight by hand.

Frosty

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A neighbor from down the street that I've never spoken to before came to the house and said that he was moving and had some stuff to give me. A 40X 40 mobile workbench with 3/8" plate top, a like new oxy-acetylene cart, a parts cleaner tank, a milk carton full of logging chain, plate jaws for hoisting steel plate, a new 5 gal gasoline safety can, silver solder, welding rods, mig tips for my lincoln 200, a 12" and 18" c-clamps and and 4 more c-clamps-the type with short throats and a square head. I ended up buying 15 large milling cutters for $75 and 8 heavy duty military surplus adj shelving units for $100. I moved my forge and tool racks to the new workbench and I'll pass the gas can, chains and parts tank to my buddy who's helping build our new shop. All from a complete stranger....we were really blessed

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My wife went garage sales today( her birthday) and brought me home this knife vise stand.
drafting_table_knife_vice_stand_003.JPG

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Buy her some flowers!

Deb would've claimed it for herself and I wouldn't blame her.

Let us see a pic when you get it set up please.

Frosty

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Thanks Sam, Frosty, Irnsrgn

She's a keeper (The Wife) stand too.
Taking her to breakfast today. Oh, she does keep some things for her self, things I find for myself, but more than makes up for it w/finds like this.
Thanks for looking.
Mark

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The time spent making the project tooling was enjoyable, but bringing the tools home and knowing all the things you want make with them are within reach, priceless,
from left to right:
1. drift for bottle opener
2. ball punch
3. slot punch
4. eye punch
5. eye socket punch
6. sharp chisel
7. curved chisel
8. shouldering tool drift
9. shouldering tool
and 2 wizard bottle top lifters, tested and retested, and found adequate for usage!! The test subject was Yingling Black and Tan, in honor of the instructor!

Edited by divermike
bad spelling

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They look great Mike ! I hope to someday take a class with Mark when he is in New England.

Dick

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I had a gas fired kiln/furnace for a crucible(I'm assuming) jump in my truck. The inside diameter is 8 inches x 12 inches tall. I did not get a crucible with it but I can get one easily enough. This was made by Denver Fire Clay Company, who is now out of business. Anyone know about this or what it's use was intended for (small casting I'm assuming)? - JK

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Here's something that 'followed me home' from the flea market. I gave the guy $2 for it. He didn't know what it was and neither do I.

I thought it might be handy to turn a blower, wire brush, or small grindstone.

Any one have any idea what this was used for?

SANY00691.JPG SANY00681.JPG SANY00662.JPG

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no idea, but it looks cool, and it sure is somethin to turn somethin, man I gotta get me one of those...

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Visited an estate sale yesterday. Reckon no blacksmiths had been there yet :-)
This is a virtually unused D. Maydole hammer. I suppose its a cross peen. Odd shape. Google search says circa 1920.

14811.attach

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AT the SWABA meeting I traded an old Johnson gas forge mixing box for some swages and a hardy---I did the trade "break even" based on what I had in the box vs what *I* would have paid for the tools.

A got a couple top swages that I forged down the eye end with my screwpress to fit in an 1.5" hardy hole as I have 3 anvils with that sized hole and little tooling for them. The bottom swages with smaller shanks I dressed them cold to fit a couple of my other anvils.

One of my students just picked up his first anvil a 138# Peter Wright in *GREAT* condition; turns out his grandmother had a couple stashed away...His uncle got first pick and got a larger anvil; but being young and so probably moving around a bit the 138# is just right for him...and FREE to boot!

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Saturday I picked up a Buffalo Forge #22 drill press, 2 large Jacobs Super Chucks, 3 small Jacobs Super Chucks, and a Brown & Sharp 215 micrometer.

The drill press is in running condition and the bearings and gears seem to be in good shape. There is not any noticeable backlash in the quill but the quill auto feed and back gear engagement mechanism need repaired.

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It looks like a movie film hand winder to me James but it's been a long time since I've even seen a pic of one.

Whatever it is I want one too!

Frosty

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Visited an estate sale yesterday. Reckon no blacksmiths had been there yet :-)
This is a virtually unused D. Maydole hammer. I suppose its a cross peen. Odd shape. Google search says circa 1920.


Looks more like a struck tool to me. Has the characteristic bevels like so many other struck tools I've seen. Maybe a fuller of some sort. Maydole tools have a following with collectors, as he invented a process for making the eye longer for more strength. Seen mostly with carpenter hammers, IIRC.

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Keykeeper, ya mean a handheld (or powerhammer ) tool for drawing?
I thought that at first but has a regular hammer handle unlike the handles on my punches.
Hmm, reckon I better do some homework:-)

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Bruce,

Could be used either way. After looking at it, I would be inclined to use it either way myself, although would seem off balance and nose heavy for use as a hammer. I was just speculating, as so many of the handheld type struck tools seem to have had the bevels cut on each corner of the cross section, I think to reduce the amount of mushrooming and/or help direct the force of the blow to the center of the tool.

Either way, I would have snatched that up myself. Looks well made, and if nothing else, a great conversation piece around the smithy!

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