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I Forge Iron

It followed me home


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My old woodworking teacher Mark Perry liked to say that the tool as it comes from the store is just your starting point. 

(Now, I will say that the tongs I got at Quad-State from littleblacksmith and Dave Custer were ready for use without modification. There are always exceptions.)

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Today is the big day. Also, since it's being delivered instead of me hauling it myself, it's literally "following me home".

Taking delivery of a couple items I bought used - an Anyang 33 lb. hammer and a nice small coal forge today. Should arrive safe and sound by lunchtime. I'll snap a couple photos and post them once it gets here.

I'm all excited... almost like a kid at Christmas.

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Thanks. Yeah, I'm pretty stoked!

The little 33 lb. hammer hits way harder than I expected it would. I've never even tried any kind of power hammer before so I have no frame of reference except my "Armstrong" hammer, which would have taken waaaay longer to do this to a 1" square rod than the little hammer did today. This was a single heat. I know the hammer is small, but I am impressed.

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On 12/3/2021 at 8:38 AM, JHCC said:

My old woodworking teacher Mark Perry liked to say that the tool as it comes from the store is just your starting point. 

Both of them work well for holding things. But after using the larger of the two today I am not totally thrilled with how they open. They are a little stiff. This makes it harder to do things like take a cube and work it into a ball. For that I need to adjust the piece a lot. When I have trouble opening the jaws I waste heat.

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Heat up the boss/rivet area and then work them open and closed a bit, they'll loosen up. Some of thee store bought tongs are made from cast and/or MC steel so I wouldn't quench them. Just them slow cool, maybe a dunk in oil at a lower heat for lubrication purposes.

You shouldn't need to do that if you buy tongs, but the rivet might have just been a little tight from the factory. Should be easy enough to smooth out.

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Not sure what followed me home....was hoping for some identification help.  I think (using that term in the loosest possible manner) it might be for riveting.  The only marks are 1887 (stamped) and a diamond shape with the letter "B" cast on one side of the wing nut and 7/16 on the other side.  Any and all help/guesses/conjectures are welcome.

 

 

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Could it be the clamp of an early line/metal hose flaring tool? Most modern will do different sizes. This one would do two. 

The clamp part locking the holder on the line/metal hose then another tool to flare it like brake/fuel, maybe other fluid line. 

I don't really see it holding up great to hammering out rivet heads but I don't know for sure. 

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When you’re crimping the ferrule over a barbed fitting for a pneumatic or hydraulic hose, you need more force than you can get with regular pliers. If you’re not using some kind of press, the lever action of the Vise Grip-type handles gives you the force you need. I’m guessing these were made before 1924, when Vise Grips were invented. 

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Farmall, is it camfered on both sides or just one?  A flaring tool is more likely chamfered on one side. And I can concede it may be a crimping tool but it still Could be a flaring tool. The other part would just be a screw press cone that fits over the end of the tool to flare the hose being held in place.

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Went to an extremely interesting and mind boggling estate sale this past weekend.  Went on the opening morning and then went back on the last day for the 50% pricing.  I didn't buy this the first day and continued to kick myself for not getting it until I went back on the last day and it was still there!  I actually got it for less than half price too.  There was so much stuff still there on the last day you could fill a box and offer them $5 or $10 and they would say okay.

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9 hours ago, Daswulf said:

it still Could be a flaring tool. The other part would just be a screw press cone that fits over the end of the tool to flare the hose being held in place.

If this were a flaring tool, I'd expect the outsides of the jaws to be straight. As it stands, I don't know that the screw press part could engage the jaws equally well for both sizes.

2 minutes ago, Daswulf said:

Is that a bar stock cutter?

Yup. Just slip the bar through the smallest hole it will fit in, and crunch. The bar can be any cross section, so long as it fits in the hole.

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