Glenn

It followed me home

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I aint no vice expert but shouldnt the fasteners holding the collar be counter sunk? 

I would put my money on there is either a part missing that the little bracket is making up for, or something broken that the little bracket is making up for. Possibly the collar could even be a part from a donor vice that just did not quite fit. 

 

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Went looking for a 25 gallon steel grease drum for a project. Somehow returned with 2- 55 gallon steel drums and a plastic 55 gallon drum instead.  

I have to quit going to those places. (grin) 

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The problem with the shaper is that it was buried under several lathe beds.  All I could see was its bottom and did notice that the table was gone.  The pulley I got was actually from an Atlas lathe but it appears to be the same as what is on my Atlas shaper.  When I got my shaper, the motor and drive pulley jack shaft system was missing and the previous owner had mounted a 3 phase gear motor so it was a single slow speed.  I did fabricate a new jack shaft but lacked the correct pulley that would mate to the step pulley on the main drive shaft.  I did tug a bit on the shaper to see if I could dislodge it from the pile but no luck and I do not climb on the pile although I want to.  In the past, I could get one of the workers to come over with the big claw and drag stuff out for me but I now hesitate to ask as I feel my access to the yard is somewhat tenuous.  Years ago, I could shop there with no problem and they would help me with heavy stuff if I needed it.  Then one day I went to shop and they said sorry, the insurance company would no longer allow pickers.  I eventually was able to gain access again after several years of bringing them stuff but I wonder where my status as a picker stands.  In fact I did get yelled at during my last rip there.  There is one guy there who likes to rag on me about anything he can and this time he told me I had to leave as he said I had been there to long.  I do bring the lady that runs the scale chocolates now and then and next time I think I'm going to bring some donuts for the crew.  And the reason for being there "to Long"  is that a guy came in with pickup truck loaded with lots of rusty stuff including a bunch of old steel tool boxes.  I helped him unload and that is where most of the good stuff came from.  I was hoping for some real serious treasure in the boxes but they were filled with mostly old bolts, odd hardware and nails.

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The Good, The Bad and the Ugly:

GoodBadUgly1.jpg.df6b2fb4b2ad10b36c98e35f604b6955.jpg

The Good: pickup coil spring so new it still has the paper label on it!

The Bad: once was a 30# anvil with a cast iron body and steel face; now broken worn abused and a lot of weld stringers on the side.

The Ugly: heavily rusted 2" diameter truck axle, I'm going to try to make some hammers from it anyway.

All scrapyard finds 20 cents a pound + a finders fee for the anvil. (Well worth having them think of me first when a good one  comes in!)

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Went to a garage sale this afternoon. Not much but these guys.

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The top one is ultra fine i mean like whet stone fine. one of them there "knife" shaped files that the flat edge has no teeth, i know what they are used for but cant remember what they are called. A super course rasp (more on it in a minute) I think a mill bastard.

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Another mill bastard, 2 square 1 course 1 fine, and a round. 

The rasp.

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It is a half round, that is the rounded side hence the curves, but there is no cross teeth. I have been around carpenters, metal workers, mechanics, machinists and i have never seen a rasp that course. Some help on the use and purpose would be appreciated. 

Anyway for $2 i could not pass them up. And the guy said he had a bucket full more files and he would dig them out for me to stop tomorrow and look at.

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I'm not sure what that rasp is meant for but it looks like it would work great for stone sculpting

Pnut

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its not a rasp its a vixen file they were used for lead body filler before there was bondo fiberglass for auto body repair .

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I think they were/are called lead floats.  When I was in high school the metal shop had a lead sprayer that would spray molten lead much like a paint sprayer.  It left a  fairly rough surface which was then smoothed with the float.  I think filing stone with one would kill it in short order.

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I am so excited. I was handed down my great grandfather's forge!  It needs a little bit of work but overall it's in really good shape. Just need to make the tube from the blower. 

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I will be getting his Anvil and treadle stone as well. 

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Yep now I just need to find a good source of coal. Everything I found on line is stupid expensive. But I'm hoping with Wyoming next door I'll be able to get a good line on some stuff. 

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Look for other blacksmiths, farriers that use coal. Try to locate those selling coal stoves in your area.  If they sell the stove chances are they sell coal. 

They should have the analysis for the coal they are selling. The higher the BTU of the coal the higher the heat value the coal contains.

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Cannon Cocker,

congratulations on getting the pieces of family history. 

I was lucky and got my grandfathers blower and my uncles blower and forge earlier this year. I found some 3” aluminum flex vent at the big box store to connect the blower to the forge that works great 

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Cannon cocker...you lucky dog, you. 

Dogblazer, vixen file aye. I am old enough to remember lead in cars. Anyway i did a little research on them and found they are still used today for soft metal such as aluminum. Glad i did not go to town with it on hardened steel. 

Gaz, i was thinking that the floats had the wooden handles, not a file type handle but more like a wire brush handle. Sits above the cutting surface rather than attach to the end. like a sideways letter "D".

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When I was still in diapers, my Father owned a paint and body shop.  He closed it and moved "up" in the world, but his hammers and tools all remained in my life until about 2000 when my my shop was broken into and they were stolen.  For some unknown reason, I managed to end up with his Lead Float.  (would rather have ended up with his hammers)  I remember him using it when he did some lead work on Mom's 1952 Studebaker.  He took off all the chrome, leaded all the holes and repainted it.  Interesting process.   It's a beast of a file to say the least.  Still have it in my file cart and find a use for it off and on when working on wood.   It has a tang on it like most files.  Never saw a wooden "D" handle as you mentioned, Billy Bones, but I imagine it would have been easier to use in that configuration.

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image.png.e45cd71108b5d3d67819c53c8b11f309.pngimage.png.7895c8b0d82cf4d9902ec46bb89c2b02.png

The bottom one can flex the file into a curve either concave or convex.

These have mounting holes, no tangs.

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My folks were more interested in how fast the car would go in a 1/4. The most body work i was exposed to was maybe rivet in a piece of sheet metal, usually an old sign or something, mud it up, sand it down and shoot a little primer on our of a can. I got ATF for blood. 

Anyway there was a place near my shop that i did not even know existed till today when i saw a sign next to a little road that said "BARN SALE". So of course i went. I found a place with 11 acres and 4 barns. Big beautiful mid 19th century farm house. Whilest perusing amongst the old stuff in the barns i found this.

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So i asked the guy there how much. He said make me an offer. I said $100 and help me loading it in my truck. He said sold. While loading it he told me he would have taken just about any offer. Him and his wife were selling everything, buying an RV, hitting the road and never looking back. I asked about blacksmith or ferrier tools but he had none. 

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I think I have a device that holds and puts a slight curve into the lead file.  I haven't seen it in years but do recall that it had a feature at one end to hold the tapered tang of the file.  I'll see if I can find it.

 

Good dealon the drill press!

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Dear Cannon Cocker,

The Wyoming Powder River Basin coal is actually pretty poor as blacksmith coal.  It is low BTU (sub-bituminous) and is not good at converting to coke.  It also creates a fair amount of clinker.  The only reason the Powder River Basin mines are there is that it is low sulfur coal for thermal uses (power plants).  If it hadn't been for the Environmental Quality Act trying to mitigate acid rain (caused by high sulfur coals) in the early '70s there would be no active coal mines in the Powder River Basin.  With the coal companies going belly up and mines closing I have to wonder how long the Wyoming coal industry will last.

When I started black smithing (1978) I used some very nasty Wyoming coal and was very happy when I moved up to better coal (which, IIRC was mined in OK).

You'd be much better off getting coal or coke from a farrier supply retailer.

George

(old Wyoming geologist)

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Anthracite would be better than sub bituminous. It might be hard to find this time of year though.

Pnut

Sub bituminous is just a step above lignite or "brown coal".

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