Glenn

It followed me home

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South High Fleamarket: It's been over 16 years since I last went; don't know if/how it may have changed.  I liked it because when I was going it was a WORKING drive in theater so everyone had to pack up and haul off  all their unsold stuff at the end of each fleamarket session; so they could show movies that night---helped to keep prices down and negotiations for large/heavy items could be very nice towards the end of a session...

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Stopped by the fleamarket to tell folks keeping an eye out for stuff for me I was unemployed and moving back north.  Only picked up a good sized ball pein for US$1 and a $5

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10 pound Warwood sledge that I'm thinking I would make another stake anvil from, perhaps with a cone for truing up bottle openers instead of the heel for forks like the previous one shown.

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Pr3ssure, the boards with resin look to be Phenolic / Micarta. It stinks when you cut or sand it, and wear a dust mask when you do. It is used as electrical insulation, but it also makes good knife scales.

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Daswulf,

Thanks for the heads up on the wheel springing when cut.

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I've had the same experience!

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It is quite easy to become overwhelmed with free scrap only to later find you don't really need it as it's not an alloy or shape that you use much of.  If you have room and no local ordinances banning it your scrap pile can grow.  However when it comes time to move or when the City comes knocking at your door you may find the excess to be an annoyance.  After 15 years in my last location I moved 1500 miles and had to give on a lot of stuff.  Now my scrap pile leans heavily to real wrought iron and a bunch of coil springs and scrapped oxy/N2/Ar/CO2/... tanks and only 1 leaf spring pack as it's easy to source leaf springs...  I did recently end up picking up another pickup coil spring as I noticed it was brand new and still had the paper tag on it!  (I often give students a coil spring when they say they want to start making knives...)

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Stopped by Home Depot today and asked if they had any worn out jackhammer bits..........and if so could I have one.  The answer was a curt "NO.................you can't have just one.  Take six and I'll let you get out the door!"  Doncha jus luv a kidder?????  :lol:  Lifetime supply of Hardy material.

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No doubt!  I'm making a Hardy cutting chisel for my little Vulcan out of the first one I was given several weeks ago.  The 5/8" shaft to fit the tiny Hardy hole conjured it's share of laughter last week at the open forge.  Oh well, gotta start somewhere. :rolleyes:

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21 minutes ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

Not only hardy tools, they make a multitude of other tools also.

 Doghead hammer, hot-cut hardy, rounding hammer, handled round punch, all from one jackhammer bit:

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Stopped at the scrap yard again on Friday hoping to find a piece of sheet steel before I bought new from the bandits down the road.  Ended up with three sledge hammers with handles, a hatchet with handle, a small steel tool or tackle box thing filled with about 10 pounds of twist drills from smaller than 1/8" to as large as 7/8", a fuller with no handle, two 1/2" chain hooks, a brass water pump (I think a boat bilge pump) that needs a motor, big bundle of bicycle and chainsaw chain, small adjustable wrench, a nice round drift and some punches and other small tools.  Also got a pulley off an 7" Atlas shaper that will fit on mine.  All for $20.00.  Didn't really need any of it but my hoarder instincts got the best of me.  I got sort of yelled at this time for being there to long but there was so much to pick through!  Sorry, no pictures but I'm sure you have all seen this stuff before.

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A bit bummed about the hatchet.  I thought I could carve it down into a small combat type ax and outlined what I wanted with chalk.  The I proceeded to try and cut it with the gas ax but it would just melt away - very much like cast iron!  Gave up on gas cutting and hit it with the angle grinder and was surprised at how soft it was.  Sparks were bright orange with some feathering but it will be a poor working tool.  Continued to grind on it figuring a display piece was okay. 

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Here's a Chas Parker 3X vise I got recently. I gave it a good cleaning and a new coat of paint. Weighs 76lbs:

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Also, there are some things on the vise collar that I haven't seen on a Parker before, namely the angled piece of what looks like wrought iron, and the washers. Are these supposed to be there? All the washers make the end of the handle actually hit the head of the bolt, which doesn't seem ideal. Here's a closer photo of that:

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If you know anything about this, I'd love to hear it. Thanks!

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Did you get the base? I don't know what the bolt clip . . . thingy is. If you have the model # you can find the patent drawings if Parker doesn't have the parts breakdown and list online.

There's NOTHING like the exploded drawing in a parts breakdown to help you get to know your machines and tools. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I would take one of the doubled washers out and see if the handles clears it. The previous owner may have placed two as spacers because they replaced the bolt and it is a little too long, if so trim the bolt to the correct length.

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Agreeing with Les L; that's definitely a replacement bolt. The original would have had a bolt with a round head slotted for a standard screwdriver; much lower profile.

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Frosty, sorry, I'm not really sure what you mean by the base. I tried looking for an exploded drawing or patents, but the only information I was able to find for this model was an ad in their 1912 catalog. In the drawing for the ad I did not see the bolt clip thingy; it had just the collar like other Parker vises. The thing is, mine doesn't work with just the collar. The collar seems too big, or the washer thing on the lead screw that engages with it (I really don't know the terminology here) seems too small.

Les, I will try that. The bolt unfortunately is slightly bent, which makes it difficult to screw in much farther than it currently is. I got a replacement bolt for it of what I thought had the correct threads, but it doesn't really fit in very far. I'm guessing the bent bolt and the threads that it goes into have worn to fit each other, and now will not really fit any standard sizes.

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3 hours ago, Chelonian said:

Frosty, sorry, I'm not really sure what you mean by the base.

From the picture I don't see how it bolts flat on a bench. The immobile jaw appears to have a section that is below the bolt tabs on the visible side and it's resting at an angle as it sits. I have a couple vises that bolt down flat but they don't have parts that extend lower than the bolt tabs.

The vise I have that looks similar has a base it bolts to. The base allows it to turn horizontally. That's what I was wondering is there a base or not? I couldn't tell remote viewing from this far. :huh: 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I don't think this type of vise ever came with a base. This was sold originally as a stationary vise, not a swivel type. To mount it, I was planning on just cutting out a triangle of wood from the edge of the bench that is the same shape as the protruding support. This is just what I've seen most people do online.

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4 hours ago, Chelonian said:

difficult to screw in much farther

Make sure the bolt is not bottoming out in the hole, or the threads are only cut part way if the hole is deeper than the bolt. If you have enough threads and they are messed up partway down it may just be dirt or rust at the depth the bolt has been sitting. Take a tap and clean the threads.

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Yesterday was moving day for a lot of people in Quebec, so I went around my neighbourhood and recovered 4 metal bedframes. :)

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