Glenn

It followed me home

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On 12/9/2018 at 6:16 AM, ausfire said:

Those old wrenches would make great twisting bars with a bit welded on. And that augur bit in the plastic is worth more than you paid for the whole lot.

Good idea on the twisting bars, thanks, was gonna keep em for art-y projects. Yes it’s starting to warm up, got some other things to catch up on though, when it’s too hot tb near the forge.

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Tonight I got a bunch of various rebar from my brother who will be moving soon to Missouri, and a box of drill shavings and a bucket of end drops from a machinist that had commissioned a scorpion from me as a gift for his brother and was pleased. No better compliment than to get paid And get some scrap. :)

Got some interesting ideas for the drill shavings if they work out. 

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I've seen a knife forge welded from lathe swarf!   Unfortunatly it's generally lower carbon, though some brake drum lathe granules mixed in and some carbon migration could adjust that.

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20 hours ago, slimpickins said:

Good idea on the twisting bars, thanks, was gonna keep em for art-y projects. o

Yeah, but keep one to make one of these:

 

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Man!  I've gone through this thread and I must be talking to the wrong people or maybe talking the wrong way.  Seems anything in Alberta is either at a premium price or they're keeping it to sell as scrap.  I'm envious (to a point) of all your finds.  Maybe I need to hone my skills.

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What folks do not mention is how long and how hard they looked before finally stumbling onto that find, usually be accident.

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For example, the great deal I got last week on respirator filters and the (almost) 200 lbs of (probably) 4140 steel I got from the industrial surplus place was the result of (A) watching their website like a hawk and (B) taking advantage of the sale day when the steel was 50% off.

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Ausfire, Gentleman, as an entomologist, I have to insist that insects (and arthropoda in general), have their antenna located in fore part of the head, not on the thorax. Best use I have seen of a pipe wrench when not used for the propose it was created for...

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Caotropheus, thank you. We do not always get it ALL right in scrap art but we try. It usually ends up as our rendition. Ive had the thorns upside down on many a rose I've made. Still do on occasion. 

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17 hours ago, caotropheus said:

Ausfire, Gentleman, as an entomologist, I have to insist that insects (and arthropoda in general), have their antenna located in fore part of the head, not on the thorax. Best use I have seen of a pipe wrench when not used for the propose it was created for...

Another biology nerd! Excellent, and I'm glad I'm not the only one who saw that lol

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These came in the mail today: prescription safety goggles with bifocal lenses. 

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 Not sure how I feel about these. They are supposed to have an anti-fog coating, but they fog up pretty easily. They also have the reading lens section in a slightly awkward location. I’m interested in seeing how they are in actual use. 

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I went to a farm auction today. I had to sort out the big 1 1/4” anhydrous ammonia spring knife shanks from the scrap metal pile to be able to buy them separately, $10. The Rock Island vise and the wood clamp were $2, together. The, brand new, s tine cultivator shanks were $15. I gave away one shank and one tine before I took the picture. 

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Not exclusively for blacksmithing, but I just picked up (used) my first pair of steel-toe boots. 

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On 12/15/2018 at 10:16 AM, JHCC said:

These came in the mail today: prescription safety goggles with bifocal lenses. 

Glasses, tee shirt, new boots, if you’ve got a blacksmith apron, you’ve got it covered head to toe.

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Helped a gentleman haul some hay bales that had toppled off of his truck and scored me a drill press today!  It’s a 16 speed Jet on a homemade stand. It has a tiny wobble In the chuck so I’m going to take the arbor (not sure of correct terminology) out and clean the tapered shaft and see if that cures it. It should clean up nicely. 

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Some sash weights (Didn't really follow me home, they were inside an old sash window we replaced) Not sure what to do with them as they are poor quality cast iron, open to ideas and suggestions! (I may cut one down to use on the end of a chain as a hold-fast on the anvil)

Also a large steel washer from the street outside, blacksmith's roadkill!!

 

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Sash weights are great for a chain hold down. Use a motorcycle, logging roller, or bicycle chain...they lay flat on the anvil as compared to conventional link chain.

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