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I Forge Iron

Anchors and Chains


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Living near and working on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, also known as "The Graveyard of the Atlantic" these are all over the place. You find them as yard art in most fishing villages. This one is in Wanchese. 

I am 6'2" to give some perspective of the size.

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Mark <><

 

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there are several steps that you do not every day. First the use of a puddle forge to pick up hunks of molten wrought iron. Then there is the scarf to attach the 2 parts of the anchor. the use of filler material to fill the gaps when welding up the two parts of the anchor. then in the beginning the placement of the forge weld on the links is on the side not the ends. it is a great video

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That film was shown on a continuous loop at the 2000 Flagstaff ABANA conference.  I must have watched it 25 times since then, and it never ceases to amaze.  They had only one chance to "stick" the anchor parts.  After the weld, it was too big to put back in the furnace/forge.  I like how they added white hot bars to fill in the gaps.

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Knowing about "glut welds" (using filler to add to the parent material) is very useful and can be done on small stuff, too. I have found it particularly useful when I have miscalculated the length of a collar when doing collar welds. I think there is a bit in the old COSIRA books about doing a glut weld to make a square corner, but I have never managed this successfully. When you are welding two pieces that weigh in tons rather than pounds or ounces, the welding heat is there for much longer, and in this video must have been just incredible. I guess that's why they are all dressed like mummers when welding the anchor!

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Notice in the first video the height of the anvil, lower than normal to aid in maneuvering the large pieces of steel and so that the strikers can get full throw of their sledges.

 

Josh

 

Josh, in the "olden days" most anvils were mounted really quite low as a mercy to the strikers. Striking on a high anvil is tiring stuff!

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  • 1 month later...

Nothing to add but thanks macbruce and all other contributors - I had watched that first film at least six times before, but this thread has made it so much more enriching - what with all of the new material and personal gems.

 

I was up on the side of a mountain Monday whining about my 10 pounder....... wahh wahh wahh

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