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Thanks Daniel :)

 

I didn't have a sander,  I bought the boards already cut to the sizes I wanted and did all the work using only a drill and sand paper (the round pieces on the sides of the anvil were a pain in the a** to make :P )  ...  to flatten the top of the multiple boards screwed together I used sand paper around a roll pin ('>).  but since I knew it wasn't gonna be perfect, I decided to put the extra board on the top as well, then I used it as a tool holder as well,  here is a pic where we can see the holes I did a little better : '>

I don't recommend the 2'' hole for the hammer centered (like the one in the front), its sort of clumsy to take it out since it hits the horn (or the heel if it were on the back), the 2 in the back work much better... I'll probably drill a couple more 1/2'' holes for tongs close to the corners.

 

and again, thanks for the original idea, I'd be lost without it !

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Pijamak you put up yours just in time to save me from botching mine! :-D i just scored some free scrap lumber from lowes (yes i spoke to multiple staff members and got their blessing before i took it) that im going to fab up into this type of stand.  hopefully ill be able to get it finished in a reasonable timeframe.  gotta do a little more carpentry right off the bat though because the boards are 2x8 instead of 2x12, so ill end up cladding the outside faces instead of just having a single row of boards.  but building an integral tool tray into the top will save me from needing to throw together a secondary table to keep things at arms length.  at least not immediately :)

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  • 11 months later...

I'd go with forged tool holders lagged into the stand that you can use as handles when you move it---moving the anvil separately of course!!!!   Me I just ran the bolts long and use the ends as handles---I also found some screw on eyes for utility pole guywires that make a good handle.

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Well bad phone picture; but perfectly adequate anvil stand made from scrounged materials: cost was a couple of hours in time and a couple of dollars spent at the scrap yard.  I was smithing on it that afternoon. Please not that the anvil fits on it but is just loosely dropped atop it in the picture so to be ready to be thrown in the truck to go to my regular class. Description of the build is in my previous post.

post-168-0-18157300-1403788996_thumb.jpg

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Lots of new guys tend to over think things like anvil stands. There is no perfect anvil stand, sure there is the best for the job or person but knowing that comes with experience. I'm not using my first stand nor even the first type I used. Things like anvil stands will change as you learn the craft and your needs change.

 

My take on the best anvil stand for the beginner is the one that lets you get working soonest. A tight bundle on end makes an excellent stand. Wrapping a band around the top will make it more solid. If you bend the strap cold and just a bit short you can warm it till it slips over and let it shrink tight. I have my swage block on this type stand, old guard rail posts, through bolted and liquid nails makes it solid swage block stand goodness.

 

Lumber laid flat and cross ricked like dunnage makes a dandy stand too. An upside to this kid of stand is it leaves lots of handy little nooks to stash tools while you're working, a down side being lots of little nooks to catch dropped stuff so you can't find it.

 

There IS one hands down most important, no exceptions, no argument about it MUST BE for any anvil stand. The anvil MUST be secure, it can NOT fall off and the stand can NOT tip over. Even a small" anvil falling on your foot can be a crippling injury and how would you feel if a youngster had your anvil fall on him/er?

 

How you hang tools will change too. I started out hanging everydoarnedthing on the anvil stand but that didn't last. I like room between the anvil's feet for my hardies: hot and cold. After that room to hang a couple few hammers, 2or3 us usually plenty. I no longer keep my hot sets on the anvil, it's just too easy to walk into them and hot sets should be SHARP. Box handles make fine hammer racks on the stand and you can use them to move the block. I've seen lots of good hammer racks on blocks, some forged, some just bent and screwed on, some leather, some rope, some wood. They all work and until you've developed the skills sets to make your style all you need is something that does the job.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I don't think you would have to worry about the boards cracking. As far as extra foot relief, that's just preference, I haven't felt the need to get any closer to my anvil.

 

If you can secure it to the floor it will be much more stable. A few of the leather loops I did have popped off the rivets, probably because I used the wrong rivets for the thickness of the leather.

 

The next one I build when my fontanini anvil comes in will have iron hardware around it for hanging the tools.

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  • 3 months later...

Is there a general rule of thumb for how high you should make it?

 

DO NOT build the stand until you find out the height of the anvil face that you can use comfortably.

 

Any arrangement of materials such as cinder blocks, bricks, boards, pallets, etc so you can raise or lower the anvil can be used for testing. You will want to start with the face of the anvil about knuckle height when standing erect with a closed fist. From there raise or lower the anvil until you do not have to bend over and allows you to feel comfortable when swinging the hammer.

 

My suggestion is to NOW place a piece of 3/4 inch thick wooden sheeting on the anvil face. Hit it 3 times with the hammer with the same swing and impact you would use while forging. Notice the crescent moon marks. 12 o'clock and the anvil face is too low. 6 o'clock and the anvil face is too high. 3 o'clock or 9 o'clock and your hammer is tilted. Adjust as needed until the indentations from the hammer are full circles meaning the hammer is hitting the wood flat and square. Use this height for a period of time and be sure you are comfortable with the swing, impact, and overall height. Adjust as needed to YOUR forging methods, keeping in mind you want a full circle imprint of the hammer.

 

Measure the height of the anvil face and build you new and permanent anvil stand to this height. 

 

This has been covered in other threads and discussions on the site. You may want to look them up for additional references.

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  • 3 months later...

i did indeed run for my 3/4" thick wood sheeting and tried glenn's recommendation very soon after his post. it worked exactly as described by him. i had several different heights already in place and can state with certainty the results will paint a very clear picture. always a confidence builder to know absolutely positively.

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  • 1 year later...
  • 3 years later...

Thanks for the idea! My 16 year old daughter made one with riveted leather straps, an industrial silicon mat to help kill the ring, a coffee wash prior to the stain to get a very very dark color (increased tannins help the vinegar/rust stain to work better), and some strong magnets on the underside of the anvil to further muffle the ring. It was a great project!

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