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“New” toy for the shop.


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So a buddy of mine had a lead on a old South Bend vertical mill… so I ended up being the new owner today. Scored the machine, all the end mills, the converter to step it down to 220 for 100.00 bucks. Pretty stoked. Now to clean it up, oil it and start learning how to use it. 

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  • 1 year later...

I learned the "end mill" was the machine you bought and the tooling was the cutters and various clamps and jigs to support and position the work. I never really learned to run an end mill but would be willing to force myself if a beauty like that landed in my shop for so reasonable a price. Tooling can get pricy, ask Fly.

Frosty The Lucky.

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  I always understood "end mills" to be a form of tooling.  And machines were either horizontal or vertical.  I'm sure by now they are all... all axis, crazy hybrids that don't require but a fingertip and 011100 to make them go.

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This just made my memory pop, horizontal mill and vertical mill as the machine's name!  Aren't "end mills" a type of cutter? I didn't spend much time on the mill in high school shop, I just didn't have much use for it so once I passed the test I was off to other stuff. It was a horizontal mill and I know the cutters had names but they're gone, like smoke on the mind.

Frosty The Lucky.

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End mills are the cutters. Two main types of milling cutters- peripheral and face cutters. Face mills designed to cut surface perpendicular to axis of spindle, usually large diameter. Side cutters cut parallel to spindle axis. End mills are a combination cutter that can do both, but usually smaller than face mills.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Scott, regarding gear cutters - IIRC each gear tooth size required a set of 8 to 10 cutters - each cutter had a range of the number of teeth which they could cut depending upon how many teeth were required on the gear you were cutting. Cutting gears also required an indexing head. You don't see many of these anymore either.

CNC multi-axis machines have replaced much of the old way of machining. Our newest lathe at my college is part CNC and manual, but there is no compound rest, no thread chasing dial - single point threading can only be done in CNC program mode.

Here is a drill I picked up awhile back. Can’t really use it. 2-9/16 in diameter. It’s still cool to have though, interesting conversation piece.4E50A454-457A-40E4-9E0D-72E3C79E69D4.jpeg.4a51f430fc34f988246376de4381cd4f.jpeg

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  You are right PHD.  A lot of cutters.  I had a small indexing head but was downsizing for moving and quitting the hobby and tried to sell it but nobody had an interest so I got took to the cleaners on it.  I started out making my own fixtures for cutting gears on my lathe and even made a fixture that approximated a bevel, good enough for my own uses.  That drill bit is a good conversation piece for a buck!  Tell everybody a watchmaker gave it to you.

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