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cipote

garden fence

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Hello all, newbie here,

     Could someone suggest where to look or a book to use in making a small garden gate/fence. Basically, I'd like to learn how they where done before welders where around. I can't figure out how the vertical rails where fastened to the horizontal ones. Trying to learn how things where done old school.

Mike

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Hand Forging and Wrought-Iron Ornamental Work by Thomas F. Googerty has some illustrations.

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Depends largely on the design. Can you show us an example of what you had in mind?

 

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A very basic gate since my skill is very limited/new. I'd like to have stems for the vertical rail and daisy for the flower. Something like this gate.

Daisy-Gate-Salisbury-1.jpg

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Since welding started with the smelting and working of iron you will need to look into wooden fences and gates to be predating welding.

Mortise and tenon, riveting, twisting, collaring, heat shrinking, lots of ways of fastening stuff together without welding it.

However the COSIRA books (available in pdf form free online) covers a lot of this.  In particular may I commend to your attention: "Decorative Ironwork"  which has 7 designs for grillwork/gates with step by step instructions on how to make them.

Note that since we don't know which of the 100+ countries that participate on this World Wide Web forum you are in we can't advise you on design restrictions to meat local building codes.

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Awesome you guys! ThomasPowers, I will get those files for sure. I guess I should look more into the European blacksmithing history more, since there's more history there. But I know that there must be others in the states that like to do reproductive works. And yes, thank you Irondragon, I will update my profile. I'm such a noob, lol.

 

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The Cosira books are I believe not currently available on line, the website I am informed is being overhauled, and they should be returning, but when that will be I have no idea.

These are some notes from an intensive basic Blacksmithing course I host. They are intended as a reminder of what can be used in various projects and situations that have been dicussed in class.

Joining methods used in metalworking

Welding;                Forge welding, oxy acetylene, arc, Mig, Tig, spot

Riveting;   Round or square shank, different heads and riveting allowances for different types of head

Studs; Threaded rod, double ended, need a tapped hole or/and nuts

 Ball nuts; Round, domed, and other profiles

Collars; Shaped, riveted (Multi parts), cast, need for use of mandrel

Wrapping; Like collars, but from wire/round rod

 Brazing; Use of brass, copper, fluxes, cleaning after

 Silver soldering; Different grades of solder, use of flux, cleaning after

 Threading; Use of taps and dies thread, chasers, tap and die holders, drilling for core diameter/tapping size, clearance sizes, cutting fluids

 Nuts and Bolts; Types and uses of threads, different pitches, Identification on heads

 Tong with a Slot and Wedge; Leg vice type fitting, can be easily dismantled, use table legs, frames etc

 Cotter pins; Like old bicycle pedal fixings, go solid but can be dismantled. Tapered flat on one side to fit against flat on a shaft, secured in place by nut with washer

 Split Cotter pins; Made of thin sheet, ( C=== ) fit through a slot and legs bent out to retain glass sheet etc ie lanterns

 Taper Pins; Used to secure rings on shafts eg on Blacker hammers, that move, but not rotate or similar situations. (They need a taper ream to form the hole after drilling, pins can be removed if required)

 Roll pins and dowels; Used to locate items, and are removable.

 Halving joints,

 Pass throughs; used to position bars but not necessarily a secured fixing

 

For sheet metal working other methods are also used, the most common being

 Lapped,  Spot weld,   Seamed,   Soft solder,   Wired,  Hemmed,  Flanged

 

I hope this may be of some use as to what may be available when assembling projects. Enjoy

 

 

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John B,

Thank you for your informative post on this thread,  supra.

The Blacksmiths of Missouri Association*,  has many blacksmithing texts, and others, on their website.

They are P.D.F. files and are downloadable.

They have many of the C.O.S.I.R.A. series there for the taking.  As well as numerous other classic books on the craft.

Try, 

www.bamsite.org/books/books.html

These include blacksmith craft,  wrought ironwork,  decorative ironwork,  catalogue drawings ….  ,  making a wheel,  weathervanes,  etc.

For those who,  instead,  want a tactile book, they are available for sale second hand.

About a decade ago the C.O.S.I.R.A. books were obtainable through second hand book merchants  for very reasonable cost. 

Those books may not be so cheap,  these days.  But it's worth a shot.

SLAG.

*   A very good group with a web site full of excellent information.

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19 hours ago, cipote said:

like to do reproductive works.

I like to do the reproductive works too! :lol: Ahhhhh, I LOVE a good straight line! Thank you. :)

I don't have any real contribution to make in light of the expert advice offered already but I just couldn't resist such a tasty straight line.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

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Thanks everybody! I ordered the decorative works Cosira book to start. I do better with step by step instructions so I hope that will help.

Oh man Frosty, I just got that....duh...good one!

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