Zeroclick

New Workshop (Finally)

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Hi All,

So I have finally moved to my new house which is amazing.

But even better is I get a new workshop which is alot bigger, it is 6m by 3m.

I will be making alot of changes, to get it just how I want it and thought I would show all of you.

Thanks,

Luke

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Very very cool space 

needs a gothic blacksmith door!!

hehe. 

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13 hours ago, Jonnytait said:

Looks like a good space! will look even better full of tools ;)

Already done :)

14 hours ago, Scrambler82 said:

Nice space but close to the neighbor’s house… !

Well that was one concern but there is about a meter gap, and I have no power hammer :( Also the ground is quite soft so shouldn't carry the vibration to much.

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7 minutes ago, Scrambler82 said:

Hope you have good neighbors !

Enjoy the new shop !

So do I, mind you he has a whole garden of workshops :) and I can always make them something to appease them.

My plan is to panel out all the inside and use insulation to reduce the noise, also the roof will be coming off and replaced with Kingspan insulated roof sheeting. Between both of these I should be pretty quiet.

My only slight concern is smoke but I use coke and it is pretty light on smoke.

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9 hours ago, Zeroclick said:

Already done :)

Well that was one concern but there is about a meter gap, and I have no power hammer :( Also the ground is quite soft so shouldn't carry the vibration to much.

you should take some photos of what it looks like all set up

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2 hours ago, Jonnytait said:

you should take some photos of what it looks like all set up

It is quite all setup I have a lot of the garden stuff to move to the shed. But I will post an updated photo as soon as I can.

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Enjoy the shop! Nice to have a set place to work and keep your tools.

Oh, North Yorkshire?! You must know my relatives - Jeff and Katherine, and Richard and Karen. Just kidding! They probably live miles from you.

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7 hours ago, John in Oly, WA said:

Enjoy the shop! Nice to have a set place to work and keep your tools.

Yeh it is just nice to go in and not have to move everything around just to get to my tools.

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Well that filled up a lot quicker than I thought.

Nearly all the stuff near the big door is going to get moved to the new shed so I will gain all that space back.

 

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Most important to have a separate shed for garden and lawn tools!   (explain that it is a safety issue as things like lawn mowers have gasoline in them!)

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6 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

Most important to have a separate shed for garden and lawn tools!   (explain that it is a safety issue as things like lawn mowers have gasoline in them!)

I can't get away with that as it's electric, but the shed will be put up really soon.

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Indeed and the danger of having a hot piece of steel flip out of your tongs and hitting the powercord melting through the insulation is just going to be ignored!!!!  (Be inventive!)

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Lol that is very true never thought of trying that one. Mind you she is keen as well she likes to come into the forge and have a go as well. So is almost as keen as me to get everything sorted so there is plenty of space.

But at least it is all moving in the right direction.

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OK, my wife views my shop as being where any yard junk should be stored. Somehow putting it into her spinning studio never seems a valid option...

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Lol isn't that always the way. Tash has decided for me to get the workshop she had to have a craft room. Which now means I will not be allowed to put books in there.

But as they say marriage is all about compromise.

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So I need to put a chimmney in as the weather is now taking a turn for the worse and can't leave the doors open anymore.

Going straight up through the roof. So I was planning to take the route through the side following the red lines on the picture, then to increase flow add an inline fan where the blue smudge is to keep it away from the heat and then the cowl linked on the outside.

I could really do with some advice on this as I have read a number of articles on the site, and I think I have found a midground that will work for my setup but was hoping to get a second opinion.

6" ducting ( I know 8 or 10 would be much better I don't have the space on the exit point to fit the diameter)

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00T1PKRQC/ref=s9u_simh_gw_i2?ie=UTF8&fpl=fresh&pd_rd_i=B00T1PKRQC&pd_rd_r=e71cb7a0-d071-11e7-9237-eb11a6a0f382&pd_rd_w=Nm140&pd_rd_wg=QC0Ds&pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=&pf_rd_r=S8V0BHT7BK423CM5HM98&pf_rd_t=36701&pf_rd_p=187bec3b-0822-4044-bbe9-441718232b3f&pf_rd_i=desktop

Inline fan ( hoped to compensate for the samller diameter by increasing the flow)

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01N6Y0NLL/ref=s9u_simh_gw_i1?ie=UTF8&fpl=fresh&pd_rd_i=B01N6Y2HSF&pd_rd_r=e71cb7a0-d071-11e7-9237-eb11a6a0f382&pd_rd_w=Nm140&pd_rd_wg=QC0Ds&pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=&pf_rd_r=S8V0BHT7BK423CM5HM98&pf_rd_t=36701&pf_rd_p=187bec3b-0822-4044-bbe9-441718232b3f&pf_rd_i=desktop&th=1

Cowl

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B06XF4NN5J/ref=s9u_simh_gw_i4?ie=UTF8&fpl=fresh&pd_rd_i=B06XF4NN5J&pd_rd_r=e71cb7a0-d071-11e7-9237-eb11a6a0f382&pd_rd_w=Nm140&pd_rd_wg=QC0Ds&pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=&pf_rd_r=S8V0BHT7BK423CM5HM98&pf_rd_t=36701&pf_rd_p=187bec3b-0822-4044-bbe9-441718232b3f&pf_rd_i=desktop

Thanks,

Luke

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So I was wondering if my previous post was so stupid that it has shocked everyone into silence or it got missed in all the new posts.

I am aware that an 8" or bigger would be better, but for now I have to work with what the building allows.

When I get a new roof on the place I will be going for a full chimmney with the height and diameter required.

But do you think what I have outlined would at least clear the small amount of smoke and CO that will be produced.

I am burning coke so the levels of smoke are negligble once the initial start up is done. Also I intend to fabricate a wide hood to help with capture.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers,

Luke

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Basically the items you have selected are appropriate for toilet exhaust from a group toilet with around 3-4 stalls.  I would never recommend this type of system for the exhaust from a residential kitchen hood, much less a hood serving a solid fuel forge.  There are several material and equipment size choices that are just not appropriate.  Also, I don't know what your codes are over in the UK, but over here use of that type of system would not meet code and in the event of a fire would likely void any homeowners insurance.  I strongly suggest you consider other options and get a local, competent engineer to evaluate same before use.

Some of the issues for use of you proposed setup as a forge hood evac system:

  1. Corrugated aluminum duct for long runs of hot, product conveying exhaust (fly ash...) is a bad idea both from a material selection (aluminum not steel) and surface configuration (higher friction from corrugations, local spots for potentially collection of flammable materials).  The corrugated duct also has a tendency to sag on horizontal runs, which can exacerbate the problem.
  2. Your fan is rated at 175 CFM with little or no static pressure.  Depending on your hood configuration this may not be sufficient (a good rule of thumb there is for a conventional overhead hood you need at least 100 ft./min. velocity at the opening, i.e. a 2' x 2' hood requires at least 400 CFM. As inlet velocity is the key driver for the effectiveness of a sidedraft hood, you would likely need a much higher velocity at the relatively small opening).  The fan also has a plastic impeller and a small motor inside the hot airstream.  Neither of these is a good idea for a hot forge exhaust system.
  3. The outlet cap is also plastic and has a bird/insect screen with backdraft damper.  Again material and configuration are not appropriate for the task.

If you are relying on this as general exhaust from your space (not attached to a hood), then some of the previous issues won't be a problem.  I would still recommend that you go with a sidewall exhaust fan for general exhaust (more air exchanges as required, figure around 2.5 CFM/SF as a good rule of thumb).  Remember that any exhaust you remove has to be replaced from somewhere, so you will also need a makeup air opening to the shop exterior.

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Thanks for the reply,

I did have a number of concerns myself with the choices but couldn't find anything that I could really apply to my set off in terms of the building I am in, so I thought best post something that may be possible and see what feedback I got. After looking at more setups I do agree that this won't be suitable but it is how to move forwards.

In regards to your points.

1. I did read some information about aluminium ducting on the form but I thought this related to the insualted ducting, So would steel spiral ducting be ok as it still has the raised areas. Along the horizontal run I was going to a series of brackets to support.

I am guessing this would be ok then.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Galvanized-Steel-Spiral-Duct-Tube-Ventilation-Different-Diameter-Extractor-fans/322263599833?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D49480%26meid%3D510179e5369545ec96215dab30fa897b%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D6%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D110826630595&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851

2. Apologies I miss read the spec on the fan I thought it was 298 CFM not in meters, and yes I did have my concerns for the material on it. But I thought the distance from the heat source would address the risk. I agree after reading that spec that it is totally unsuitable

3. I did find an alternative cowl which is made from Stainless Steel and rather than having the backdraft it has a larger opening and  only has a mesh on the inside to prevent birds getting in. https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01LW17LPX/ref=twister_B075XCPCYT?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

I have remeasured the space I have and may be able to just squeeze an 8" pipe in the space if I reinforce the surrounding area, the only issue i would have is finding a way to mount an up section on the outside of the building I will try to get more pictures of the setup.

I will also try to find more on the regulations in the UK I only seem to be able to find ones for internal chimmneys.

Many Thanks,

Luke

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Ok so after some more research on the laws it has to be at least 5 foot (1.5m) above the highest point of the roof so it looks like I have no choice but to go straight through the roof.

So think I will just go with the two options below and make my own cowl to go on top out of some sheet metal I have.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/110819610063?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&var=410068289360&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Dektite-Roof-flashing-Premium-Range-Square-Low-High-Temperature-Twin-Wall-Flue/321484393118?hash=item4ad9f68a9e:m:m-rkSwgOZrQUxJxr1Qar0EQ

I will just have to damp the roof and wear my face mask when I drill through and hopefully it will go well.

Cheers,

Luke

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You do not have wood stoves over their? Or zero clearance fireplaces? Two 5” wood stove pipes split at the seam and zipped together make 10”  considerably less expensive I would think. Going out the side wall and going up is still an option, you just need to brace the pipe. Certainly not the best look from the point of the domestic partners point of veiw. Around here they hid that particular ugly with framed fax chimnies for zero clearance fireplaces.

Personally I like the hight against the house and the nice brick facade to make ones forge look beautiful. But one needs to get ones ducks in a row to get a good seal. Proper flashing is a must. 

As to hoods, it’s real hard to beet the eve envy of a sidedraghft hood. With overheads placement of the fire is paramount as is a fireplace. It’s best to think of the forge hearth as a fire place hearth when designing a flue and hood. We have all seen smoky fireplaces, either due to the poor design or poor management. Any one who has put the fire against the back wall on a shallow fire box or to far forward on a deal one will know what I am saying.

          

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