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What Hammer is this?


Mende

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When I was starting out and gathering tools ( I'm still very much at the beginning but when I was REALLY starting out) I bought this hammer from a guy who told me it was a blacksmith's tool ...

He sold it to me for less than 2 bucks and said it's used to cut iron. . .and as I was a Newbie. . I thought it might be useful.

It has 2 semi sharp peens. .one straight, one cross. .. .no face. .

I found similar tools listed as Opposite hammers .. but it didn't say what they were for.
I don't have a pic. . but here's a diagram I made in MSpaint. So what should I use it for?

4197.attach

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I can't see the image, it keeps saying an error message. I probably can't help you with what it is, but I would like to see the diagram. Will look up a mason's hammer.


its like a regular cross peen hammer .. but instead of a striking face . it has a straight peen .. and i know how masonry hammers look like . .i have like 3-4 ..i use them for fullering and hotcutting ...this is not a regular hammer. .
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Photo is now attached to the post for all to view. This is one reason we request that you use the attachment feature of the forum.

First post the image to the IForgeIron Gallery. The gallery will automatically resize the image to the format that best fits in the forum. When you make a post to the forum, copy the URL under the photo and place it directly in the forum. It is that simple.

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As a matter of fact, Thomas Dean is correct with his first statement. it is a chipping hammer. I know this because a good friend of mine has one and I didn't know what it was at first either. The "straight peen" side is for chipping slag from vertically welded joints, and the "cross peen" side is for the horizontal weld joints. It's a neat little tool. :)

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I'm with Glenn, name doesn't matter can you put it to good use in your shop. How hard is it? Might convert it to a hot cutter or slitter? or as Glenn suggested as a texture hammer. Humans gotta name everything. I come from a "whatcha-ma-callit" "thinga-ma-jeebbe" backround, whatever works

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With the weight being over 2# I still lean toward the mason's hammer. Used for cutting stone/brick. I would hate to know that I had to use a 2# chipping hammer after each weld I made! Not my idea of a good time. ;) I have used a chipping hammer with the cross/straight chisel ends but they didn't weight near 2#s, more like 10-12oz.

JWBIRONWORKS, have you thought of using an air chipping gun to texture your rose petals? That is what I use, much faster and, IMO, gives a more realistic look. One of those needle scaling guns would be perfect but I don't have one. :( (look in my photos in the gallery to see one of my roses for an idea on how they look.)I had used a sheetmetal hammer for this and like the chipping hammer better. Just make sure you dull the chisel some and use either a piece of aluminum or rubber under the copper petals, steel petals you don't need the soft under support.

tbrforge, you're like me with the name deal. Do you use the word 'fixinta'? As in "I'm 'fixinta' go to the shop." This is a REAL word used extensively here in East Texas! :)

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Fixinta is a word that suggest a southern heritage.
My folks came from SE Iowa(most of my family is still down that way), and Fixinta is commonly used.
As is not commonly known, there is no R in wash, pronounced Warsh.
And a Creek is a Crick. like "I went to the swimming hole on Indian Crick".

My uncle Chet insisted he got better gas mileage, going From Waterloo to Knoxville than from Knoxville to Waterloo,cause Waterloo was up north and Knoxville was down south.
Making it all down hill from Waterloo?

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Fixinta should not be confused with Figurin'on

Fixinta is a statement of fact as in "Im fixinta go to town" unless that becomes "I was fixinta go to town" which means you have changed your mind.

Figurin'on (also figgerin'on) is a bit more vague and may require more figgerin before a decision is made though sometimes it has the same meaning as "fixinta" .

We were figurin'on goin up Indian Creek but decided to stay on the Skunk instead (this last is just between me and Jim beins as we are almost neighbors. We are fixinta meet up sometime soon)

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Yep Steve, reckon we oughtta do that. I am free most Saturdays after 10:00 am. Wife takes her mother in for Dyalisis(SP?) in Des Moines and I Batch it the rest of the day. This Sat. their predicting a winter storm, Rain,snow sleet and general " normal winter driving conditions":) may be questionable? Let me know when your free and we can work something out.

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Okay, so I'll make a contribution to the thread.

At 2lbs + I doubt it's a chipping hammer. I have one like that and it's only around 10oz.

A stone cutter's hammer is a good possibility, especially if the faces are beveled to be sharp.

Another possibility is a forming hammer, I have a couple though not in the 2lb range, they're just like the one you show.

Frosty

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It's a chipping hammer. I acquired several at one time and by removing one end or the other I made them into vertical and horizontal hot cuts. I also kept the vertical "peen" end of one, fullered around the other end (all the way around) and formed it into a pyramidal spike beyond the fuller. The vertical "peen" was then forged into a blade. It made a decent spike hawk. Oops, I forgot that I reformed the eye around a hawk drift.

I wish I had photos but I gave it away to a friend.

Steve

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