alwe1

Nordic Forge Rounding Hammers

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I have been looking for a reasonably priced rounding hammer, I am new to blacksmithing and can't yet justify spending hundreds of dollars on a hammer, and I ran across Nordic Forge hammers.  They seem to be of decent quality from what I can tell and after contacting them they have told me they think it will work for my applications.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

They have a website that is only semi functional but they were very prompt in answering my email and questions about their hammers. There are two models one is hand turned and finished the other is heat treated then machine turned and finished, each come in sizes ranging from 1.5lb up to 2lb.  I was just wondering if anyone has any experience with these hammers and can give me an honest review on how well suited they are for blacksmithing and how decent the quality of these hammers is.  

 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=nordic+forge+hammer&safe=off&rlz=2C1MSIM_enUS0537US0537&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=3e01U4u2MsPEyQHl-oBg&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1600&bih=799#imgdii=_

 

The above is a link to pictures of these rounding hammers.

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I have a 2 lb NF rounding hammer that I got in trade for a boilermakers hammer.

 

Not bad, not great, I got some chipping from the edges on the flat face after I'd dressed it a bit. The shape is pretty much the bare minimum of what you need in a rounding hammer. Certainly good enough to get used to working with a rounding hammer.

 

Personally, I've found that 2 lbs is just a little light for significant forging.  Found an older rounding hammer in horse county up in Napa at a flea market, a little under 3 lbs, more prominent shape compared the NF, and that really moves metal.

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I am currently using a Nordic. I have had to round the edges a little more and relieve the botten edge so I dont leave tracks. I think thats probable my problem. So far I fairly pleased with it. While a little light for general forge work it works great for turnin shoes which is what I use it for.

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For a first hammer I would suggest a rounding hammer between 2.5 and 3.5 pounds. There are likely many people on here who could make you one. Do a search for a Brazeal style rounding hammer. That's a good place to start. A few people sell them on ebay.  Aaron Cergol and Dave Custer that I know of make fine hammers and could make you whatever you want for less than hundreds of dollars. I think they sell in the $125-150 range for a nice forged hammer.

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Sorry to butt in here, but I've been looking for a Brazeal style rounding hammer in the 3.5- 4# range. Does anyone know if those makers mentioned have websites or are they only on ebay?

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Thanks for all of the quick replies.  Would I be better off to try a brand like diamond?  I would just like to start with a cheaper hammer to decide if I even care for the style.

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Speaking of hammer styles I also was wondering if anyone can make a suggestion or tell me the pros and cons of various hammer styles like Swedish vs German , french, Nordic, hofi etc. I'm looking to start getting a better selection of hammers I just don't know where to start because the information on uses and advantages or disadvantages of each style is so hard to find.

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I have two Nordic hammers, a 1 1/2 lb. and a 2 lb. among a wide assortment of hammers.  I use them daily for various work and have no complaints other than the head worked loose on the 2 pounder, but I fixed that.

 

I DO NOT like the Czech style with the square head.  For me, they tend to leave marks unless you are perpendicular or straight inline with your work.  I prefer a round cross section, whether round or flat faced.

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Which model of the Nordic rounding hammers do you have? The viking or just the farriers hammer?

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I have one of them, bought it as my first rounding hammer, it's good enough for me to realize I like it and how rounding hammers work better than the straight peen i had,  but light enough that i want a heavier (and more expensive) one now.

 

Cal-

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Sorry to butt in here, but I've been looking for a Brazeal style rounding hammer in the 3.5- 4# range. Does anyone know if those makers mentioned have websites or are they only on ebay?

 

I'm friends with Brian and he is on this website. Search him up. He has a website aswell. Just search Brian Brazeal Blacksmith in google and it should be one of the first ones. Hope this is helpful! I use both a 3.5 and 4.5 rounding hammer, both ones i learned to forge at Brians. Love them. And if you use the proper techniques, you seriously can move some metal! If you cannot buy one from Brian, check out Dave Custer at Fiery Furnace Forge. He too is on this site! He is one of Brian's past students and makes wonderful hammers and sells them on ebay. He doesnt have a website that i know of, but search fiery furnace forge on google and check out his facebook page. :)

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Check out the knife making class stickes, and search rounding hammer on IFI, by a 4# hand sledge and grind to suit. If you like it, then invest in or forge yourself a better one, 20$ and an afternoon invested

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Thanks guys I'll do just that. And to the OP, sorry for sidetracking the thread.

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when it all comes down to it.The hammer is not the key it is the person swinging it a well trained blacksmith can pick up any style hammer and get the same results. I like a hammer in the 3# range. I do use a 5# hammer for big stock over 3/4". For some one new you are better off getting a cross peen hammer and dressing the face. Which you have to do any way with store bought hammers. Then learn to make your own. When you have some basics under your belt.

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Which model of the Nordic rounding hammers do you have? The viking or just the farriers hammer?

 

The name was just "Nordic Forge" on the hammers.  Bought them from one of the blacksmithing retail sites, don't recall which...Kayne, Pieh, Blacksmith Depot, something like those. They are just OK hammers, but really would love to have a "Brazeal style" hammer 3 to 4 lb.size.....will have to check into the guys making them as "5starhobo" mentioned above.

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alwe1, everything that carries the Big Blu name is first class. Dean and Josh and the rest of the Oak Hill Iron crew are all full time blacksmiths. Their 'for sale' hand tool line is the same professional quality tools that they make and use every day in the ornamental iron trade. The anvils are the only things that are not made on-site. There are no 'Hobby Grade' items, every piece is high grade alloy steel, heat treated and ready to go to work.

 

Not shilling for them, just someone who has visited over the years, and respects their work.

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Are big blue rounding hammers of decent quality?

 

I'll vouch for anything Big Blu all day long. We've got 3 of their cross peen hammers, and one of them chipped after I had had it for about 6 months and they sent me a brand new hammer. It took some time at the anvil to get used to the square face, and sometimes I still find myself adjusting to the 4.6lb'er that we have from them. I'm pretty spoiled on hammers now. I'm going to invest in some diagonal peens and stuff from them. I'll gladly pay for their quality and service. Haven't had one chip since. 

 

 

Thanks for all of the quick replies.  Would I be better off to try a brand like diamond?  I would just like to start with a cheaper hammer to decide if I even care for the style.

 

alwe1, we use diamond rounding hammers. Despite my apparent love for Big Blu, I haven't tried their rounders yet, just their crosspeens. My step dad was a farrier and made all of his shoes by hand, used the two weights that diamond makes for rounders for nearly 35 years before we got new ones (fathers day gifts). We've never had one chip or crack. We never even had to replace the handles! They come with some pretty long handles, but can be cut down if you prefer longer. 

also, at 36 USD, they're a hard price to beat, especially if you're just trying to build up your hammer armory. 

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I have over 100 handled tools on my "hammer rack"  and most of them were under US$10.  I especially like buying hammers missing handles as they generally are dirt cheap and I prefer to set my own handles anyway.  If they are cheap enough I will pick them up and modify them or pass them on to students.  I did once pay $35 for a hammer---though it was a lynch collection european sledge that looked like a very big brother to my favorite medieval looking light lynch hammer.  It's still the most I've every paid for a hammer in 33 years of smithing---save for powerhammers...

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I have been looking for a reasonably priced rounding hammer, I am new to blacksmithing and can't yet justify spending hundreds of dollars on a hammer, and I ran across Nordic Forge hammers.  They seem to be of decent quality from what I can tell and after contacting them they have told me they think it will work for my applications.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

They have a website that is only semi functional but they were very prompt in answering my email and questions about their hammers. There are two models one is hand turned and finished the other is heat treated then machine turned and finished, each come in sizes ranging from 1.5lb up to 2lb.  I was just wondering if anyone has any experience with these hammers and can give me an honest review on how well suited they are for blacksmithing and how decent the quality of these hammers is.  

 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=nordic+forge+hammer&safe=off&rlz=2C1MSIM_enUS0537US0537&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=3e01U4u2MsPEyQHl-oBg&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1600&bih=799#imgdii=_

 

The above is a link to pictures of these rounding hammers.

I've been using mine for 30+ years. It still works. DON'T waste money on expensive turning hammers. Nordic and Diamond are every bit as good as any $200 hammer more suitable for General Dynamics and Gov't contractors than working folks. ;)

George

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It might be pertinent at this stage to point out that a "rounding hammer" is a hammer used to round or turn shoes. Nothing more, nothing less. A four pound hammer for turning a shoe? That's got to be a big horse!

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I've become a big fan of the rounding hammers.  Originally I was exclusively using Frenchies.  I have them from 600 to 1500g  - about 1  to 3.3 lbs.

Some guys like swedes, some german, some Czech.

For the price, the MOB ones are excellent as are the peddinghaus.

 

Lately however, I am leaning more towards these large diameter rounding hammers. I was initially introduced to the merits of them through several old favorites- Champions, Hellers and a Cliff Carrol that is about awesome. Most are in the 2lb range and several are probably at least 100 years old. The Nordic could easily fit in this category.

 It's from those designs I learned about Jay Sharp and Erin Simmons- two guys who seem to command some of the highest prices for their hammers.

 

I really didn't know about Brians work until later and while you can say there are similarities I believe the farrier models I've tried to mimic have tighter fullering. I like the mass nearer the center body. It makes spreading the cheeks trickier but, I believe, makes for a snappier blow.  They are 1045, water quenched to approx. 55 Rockwell.

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I've become a big fan of the rounding hammers.  Originally I was exclusively using Frenchies.  I have them from 600 to 1500g  - about 1  to 3.3 lbs.

Some guys like swedes, some german, some Czech.

For the price, the MOB ones are excellent as are the peddinghaus.

 

Lately however, I am leaning more towards these large diameter rounding hammers. I was initially introduced to the merits of them through several old favorites- Champions, Hellers and a Cliff Carrol that is about awesome. Most are in the 2lb range and several are probably at least 100 years old. The Nordic could easily fit in this category.

 It's from those designs I learned about Jay Sharp and Erin Simmons- two guys who seem to command some of the highest prices for their hammers.

 

I really didn't know about Brians work until later and while you can say there are similarities I believe the farrier models I've tried to mimic have tighter fullering. I like the mass nearer the center body. It makes spreading the cheeks trickier but, I believe, makes for a snappier blow.  They are 1045, water quenched to approx. 55 Rockwell.

 

Steve, do you sell these hammers? If so, what price? 

 

I just order the X-1 Rounding hammer from Big Blu Hammer, and I'm awaiting it to come in. The anticipation is killing me. 

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