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Anvil stand


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Hello, to everyone. I am new here and have gotten interested in trying my hand at forging (maybe making some knives). What are you using for a stand for your anvil? I was thinking about using 4x4's spiked together and built up for a stand. Maybe putting 100 pounds of sand in the cavity for more weight. Would this work? I am sure I will have a lot of questions so bear with me and thanks for the help!

Rodney

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There are several variations for anvil stands.
Look here for ideas: http://www.iforgeiron.com/forum/f24/contest-design-anvil-stand-1728/

Also in the gallery there are several shots of different anvil stands. Your idea sounds to be a good one. For me personally in the shop where I am an apprentice the stands are of two styles. Both are open in the back so your foot can go under the anvil to allow you to get closer to the work, and potentially save the strain on your back.

This a view from the back of one of the anvil stands at Yesteryear Forge.

Here is another stand used at Yetseryear Forge. These are used mostly for portable set ups.


I hope this helps. And good luck!!!

Peyton

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i made my stands from steel tubing 3inch by 1.5 inch wall thickness .06
with an angle iron frame to capture the anvils base the legs were cut at a 15 degree compound angle
the legs were the tubing and i only used three to prevent rocking
this works real well and is light if you have to move it
NAAMANS FORGE

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My first to stands were made from wood & look a lot like the one on the right
in Peyton reply.
They were strong but bounced on the floor & had to bolt them down.
I wanted to be able to move my anvil ( I havent much room)
Thanks to the ice storm I got my wish Big Red Oak tree fell
It about killed me getting it across the feild full of cow pies about 200 yrds.
I removed the bark tring to reduce checking & might add a iron band around the top.
Its 22 in across the top & think I will leave it that size will be good to lay tools on.

Some day hope to have a better shop set up where I can bury a log on end
in ground like the old Blacksmiths.
Ron

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First pic is my main "battle anvil" mounted on a concrete block. I built the forms and poured in a couple sacks of quik-crete. The angle iron base holds the anvil from walking and a few tools. The anvil weighs 250 and the block weighs 280 so it's a lot of mass. You can't see it very well from this view but the opposite side has a shelf to hold small items. BTW, I am right handed but prefer the horn on the right so this is the side I see when working. The stain on top is oil.

The other two pics are of the Brazeal brothers rigs which they use at demo's. Their anvil is a block of steel set on edge and configured with with different surfaces for different jobs. The other has a very small anvil and vise with plenty of room for tools. A good example of their thorough understanding of the forging process combined with thinking "outside the box".

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Any of the methods so far discussed will work well. Which you choose depends upon personal preference. I prefer an anvil base made from a section of tree trunk cut to much the same size as the base of the anvil. I have a crusher dust floor and the anvil blocks are set about 6" into the ground, they don't move even under heavy striking. For a portable it makes sense to use a steel framed base. If it is your main anvil, and your forge is already set up, you're unlikely to need to move the anvil around so a heavy base is quite practical, and desireable. Which ever method you choose to use anchor the anvil firmly to it. This will help to take some of the ring out of the anvil, and even big anvils walk around if not fimly attached.

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Building up a wood stand from 4x4's or whatever is a good way to go. I mount mine on sections of tree trunk, aka, a log. Only way to go for long term use is wood. Especially true if you have a dirt or gravel floor. Metal stands don't work so well with soft floors, but a wooden stand will work on concrete or gravel.

I don't know how full time smiths could stand on concrete all day anyway, I know it kills my back/legs/feet. Dirt or gravel floor for sure.

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  • 1 year later...

I took a 16ft 2x12 and cut it into 18" pieces then glued/nailed them together offsetting them by 2". I've seen pics of it posted around here.

It's a bit low for me so I'm thinking of building a 4" sand box to set it on then I can vary the height of the anvil.

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I did the same as Chris, but used 2"X 10", and then ran a strip of 1/8" by 1" around it top and bottom. This gave me a place to hang hammers in each offset without them falling out. I like the basic design but would probably use 2" X 12" lumber next time. I also put some lead flashing from the junk pile under the anvil to quiet it down a bit.

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I glued 4 pieces 6x6 (finished to 5.5" construction dimension) together with construction adhesive to make an 11" x 11" stand. was always going to make metal straps to go around them but the "glue" is still holding after 5 years :) It could use a 2x4 skirt around the bottom for stabilty but its never been tipped over and I move it a lot!

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Ron Hicks posted.... "Some day hope to have a better shop set up where I can bury a log on end in ground like the old Blacksmiths."

Is that the way old blacksmiths are supposed to be buried?

My anvil base is cut from a white oak stump. I used a chainsaw to make a truncated pyramid, then a circular saw to cut slots near the top and bottom. Steel bands (1/2 x 1 inch) are used in the slots (with tighteners) to keep the stump from splitting. I added some holders (screwed on the sides) for my swage block and the hardy tools I use most.

Works for me!

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My stand has been evolving over time, originally sections fo 2x12, bolted together with allthread and staggered to make little pockets for tools, then I wrapped the base with 2x4 to make it a little less tippy. Newest mod is the addition of a baking sheet tray under the anvil cause it seems like I'm always looking for a place to put the hot cut, bending fork and soapstone. I pulled the plumbers tape that was holding the 104#PW down, forged a couple of staples out of quarter inch round, glued down the tray with silicone, then glued the anvil to that and drove the staples thru the tray into the wooden stand. Haven't had a chance to try it out yet, but I think it'll work out well.

Michael

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