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This job is finally rollin after a year delay.

1-1/4" post with the corners chamfered, 1/2" x 1-1/4" top and bottom rail was staged up in the home after templates were made and copied to the bars. Cross braced and cut in segments that will be easy to handle, diagonal measurements were recorded to assemble it back at the shop as well plumb line were drawn for reference (not sure why nothing straight, just habit I suppose). Back in the shop dies and jigs were made to the specific parts to be made in number of panels, 5 large on the stair, 3 small on the stair, 2 large end curves, 1 small corner curve and 2 balcony panels. This rail will have a antique finish with a brass cap. More to come!

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This job is finally rollin after a year delay. 1-1/4" post with the corners chamfered, 1/2" x 1-1/4" top and bottom rail was staged up in the home after templates were made and copied to the bars.

Installed a little hand rail to the basement, got some more glamor shots. I may actually be finished with this house after 2 years!

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Thanks all, I'll get a shot of the tooling, nothing special just some scroll jigs and one ball swage. As far as construction goes I would be open to specific questions, but I think the hardest part of building one of these is organization and sequential methods. You cant move forward until the first previous part is finished, I think this idea also relates to the comment of "such a clean shop". Yesterday I thought to myself, how am I ever going to get this place clean and organized? :blink:

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wow danger thats some beautiful looking work - really tidy and great lines:) just lovin the ready for action clean shop too - we are all envious! what is it they say - tidy shop tidy mind or something...?

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That's looking really well done Michael.

As you say, sequense and organization is pretty much the real secret to doing complex build up jobs. The next most or maybe more important part is instalation, especially if there's a contractor buiolding or prepping the area.

I join in giving you kudos for the clean shop. Sure, it's not hospital clean but it's admirably uncluttered and laid out in an organized manner, right down to hand tools and ready components.

I like your style.

Frosty the Lucky.

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Thanks all, I'll get a shot of the tooling, nothing special just some scroll jigs and one ball swage. As far as construction goes I would be open to specific questions, but I think the hardest part of building one of these is organization and sequential methods. You cant move forward until the first previous part is finished, I think this idea also relates to the comment of "such a clean shop". Yesterday I thought to myself, how am I ever going to get this place clean and organized? :blink:


I think "clean" often gets mistaken for "organized". It's not that hard to push a broom around and clean the shop. It takes some effort to stay organized. Nice work BTW, always a treat to see your stuff in progress.
-DB
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Now your dredging David, that was done on VHS, I have a copy buried somewhere. There is a video on my site called Working Metal done about the same time, when I had more hair and I wasnt so dangerous :lol: Funny thing that vid was shot when I was building the sister rail to this one, look close they are very similar. The story, same architect 10 years latter, same house built 20% larger and it is this clients interior designer that the house was based on, weird!

The weld joints are made by cutting a deep grove on the bader for the weld to have plenty of penetration, then ground smooth. You really need a large capacity (hot) mig and really good fit up for this technique.

I'm glad the tuna is gone, at least I had a good desert, pumpkin bread! Its hard to get a lot done with that log dog under foot as well.

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Now your dredging David, that was done on VHS, I have a copy buried somewhere.


Mike, I think I have a VHS copy of it laying around the house somewhere as well. Unfortunately, I don't have a VHS player to play it in. tongue.gif

The fit up on your parts is superb. I especially like the two overlaps that go above and below plane. Really nice touch.


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David, the templates were made of 3/8" x 1" on site with a #2 Hossfeld bender, vise and a twisting bar, you can kinda make out the bending rig in the background. Basic iron horse I bolt down close to where I'm working. I use the temp. to shape the 1/2" x 1-1/4" bar at the shop, there is minimal shaping with the same rig during stage up.

Finished the last panel this week and will be starting the large curved ends Monday, should be interesting. The drawing of the curved end I tried to show three dimensionally. I tried to incorporate the straight panel design as well the clients initials in the center oval.

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David, the templates were made of 3/8" x 1" on site with a #2 Hossfeld bender, vise and a twisting bar, you can kinda make out the bending rig in the background. Basic iron horse I bolt down close to where I'm working. I use the temp. to shape the 1/2" x 1-1/4" bar at the shop, there is minimal shaping with the same rig during stage up.

Finished the last panel this week and will be starting the large curved ends Monday, should be interesting. The drawing of the curved end I tried to show three dimensionally. I tried to incorporate the straight panel design as well the clients initials in the center oval.


Thanks for that Danger. How are you doing the curved sections? Are you making it as a raked flat panel and then curving the whole panel. I've had some sucess with this on a much less complicated spiral balustrade. Or are you pre curving the individual elements before assembling the panel. I did briefly think about doing this but couldn't get my head round the idea.
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I use Kinko copiers for their blueprint machine, 36" wide by how ever long you want, saves time, pretty sure if you draw it 3"= 1' it is a 100% enlargement to get a full scale drawing.

Mac hope your learning some stuff this year, I'm going as fast as I can with only two hands.

David I post up some pics when I get there but I use both methods, whatever it takes!

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