Tommytaptap

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About Tommytaptap

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    Carmarthen, UK
  1. Mini Camping Cleaver

    And for that matter, how many people clean their food cutting implements before using them as well as after? Well I do with the mini cleaver! It has a clean polished blade which extends the whole length of it and is roughly 3/4" deep-and that's enough for me for what I am cutting.
  2. Rustproofing tuyere and bosh?

    I think if you filled the untreated, clean steel tank with plain water, left it 24 hrs and drain it then, when its dry coat it with a steel rust prevention coating. When that's dry use heat resistant silicone pumped on and spread out all over the inside of the tuyere, that would not only seal the container from leaks, it would prevent corrosion. Heat on the water side wont ever be a problem and the solution for the nozzle is well covered by Frosty.
  3. Mini Camping Cleaver

    In the same way as you would not think twice about 'seasoning' any sort of a cast iron, totally 'rough' bodied cooking container to hold food or, other cast iron food associated implements or indeed a carbon steel pan or wok-you would and should do that to a cleaver made to be similarly rough bodied. Then from there, the same goes for cleaning and maintenance of said items. That done you can safely use it for any and all cooking processes associated with the use of a cleaver without worrying. Which is more than you can say about some food outlets cooking and serving utensil cleaning regimes. There are several methods and finishes available to achieve desirable results, all of which are 'food safe.'
  4. Buying Hay Budden

    Don't wait-buy it NOW!
  5. My second knife

    A positive note here is I believe; you may have saved your mom or someone else from a dreadful accident in the future from using that old broken blade.
  6. New Workshop (Finally)

    Whats wrong with a hofi supersidesucker? You could have all of the chimney outside. You can have a proper job then-12" diameter x 3mtrs high for £65 off ebay-galvanised steel spiral ducting is what to type. Someone on here will point you to the hofi style.
  7. African wood

    A big +1 on the use of gloves when working that wood. Don't forget to wear good quality respirator suited to the tasks also-most of the African hardwoods are at the very least irritants-a few much worse for you than that. Cut a small piece, polish it and see what sort of chatoyance if any is present. You may be pleasantly surprised!
  8. Making a Workbench

    That old trick works very well with a sheared off or anyway stubborn machine bolt that's trapped eg engine block bolt. heat her up and twist her out-no problem.
  9. Railroad Steel

    Find out who the owner is and get their permission in writing to take some before removing anything. As far as I know, none of it will be high carbon steel of any note. As steel goes it will all be fairly 'soft.'
  10. How about forge cooking?

    Baked potato with butter, cheese and beans wrapped in h/d tinfoil works a treat. I have a dutch oven for larger meals but it would take up too much room and generally get in the way whereas a small spud is easy to move about. No doubt others will chip (scuse pun) in. Tom.
  11. Origami style crane

    Hi Joel- Very well done you indeed. A superb example of artisanal 'smithing at its best. It looks truly stunning. The two rails it is mounted on are a nice touch. I do hope its well fastened down to prevent it flying away. Can you tell us all the processes you executed to produce the piece? Tom.
  12. help me with anvil id

    You could always fall back on reddening some metal and making some. After a minimum of research after getting your head and fingers around the vagaries and anomalies of this forums workings- smacking some steel into various shapes will be a pleasure- guaranteed.
  13. The Start of My Coal Forge

    Henry Don't know if you've looked at the link supplied by LBS but the company don't ship to the UK which is a shame. However, all is not lost. I have also been looking for a pukka blower and came across this one on Ebay UK. Called a Bahcivan 140.60 theyre on sale in Germany for around £80 incl postage. They are even open to best offers on them! They are made specifically for blacksmith coal forges. They also sell potentiometers to vary the motor speed. Sorry don't know how to bring a link here but check out ebay-just type in bahcivan 140.60 . Tom. ps- managed to attach a picture of it!
  14. The Start of My Coal Forge

    Henry. I too have the same blower as yours. I don't know the technical details but I am given to believe that the motor in it is not one you can alter the speed of. I loosely fitted with one small bolt, a piece of Perspex to the induction grille side of it and that reduces the airflow somewhat by pulling the Perspex towards the grille. That combined with leaving a gap as described gives a much more reasonable flow. Tom.
  15. Hey Frosty- You seem to have lost all interest in your recent posting about a wood burning firegrate. Have you not seen the subsequent replies?