Jbradshaw

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About Jbradshaw

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    Male
  • Location
    CNY
  • Interests
    Wood carving tools, knives

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  1. Thomas I asked the question generally as the statement about it being to slow was given generally. I have seen statements on several occasions that a log splitter moves too slow, but never a speed referenced that would be considered appropriate, for any function. I have a log splitter (used as a log splitter but I may modify it for double duty down the road) and the ram moves at about 4 inches/second when not under load (based on cycle time). I’m haven’t timed it under a load. That is faster than the ram speeds I have seen reported on commercial presses so I am confused as to why so many people call them too slow. Maybe Frosty is on to something with the detent valve and people are actually calling the cycle time too slow, not the ram speed?
  2. How fast should a ram move to be useful as a press? I imagine the pump on one of these could be upgraded if needed and still come in at a much lower cost than a commercial press.
  3. I used a forge this weekend that was running a multi port burner using a ceramic foundry filter for the face (3/4” T burner). We ran the forge for at least 6 hours with no backfire. I’ll post a picture from the manufacturers website below of what the filter looks like. He only used one filter about 2” square so there was still a hot spot in the forge. I think two of these stuck together with some furnace cement would make for a nice burner face and spread the heat a little better. So far I’ve only been able to find these for sale by the box. With the smallest box being 100 count. It also has me wondering if anyone got anywhere with using the ceramic barbecue blocks. I saw a test burner a few pages back but no final product.
  4. I asked about the pneumatics being variable speed because my electric one is on/off. I wonder if I could plug it into a variable speed foot pedal to adjust the speed. Something like this assuming I can find one with adequate amps. [Commercial link removed.]
  5. Frosty I certainly don’t mind a PPE reminder. I never use any powered abrasive without glasses and hearing protection. If it is more than a 3 second deburr of the end of a piece of small stock I also use a respirator and face shield (over the glasses). I can pull out the old leather biker jacket from the Mohawk days if I need to. I usually use it when welding. Are the pneumatic die grinders typically variable speed? I find myself wishing I could turn the speed down the few times I’ve used the electric one. I’ll pick up some Rolock discs and stone bits (I only have a white ball shaped one) to have around and figure out what I can best use them for.
  6. I have one of these that came in a tool cart I picked up at a garage sale. Mine is Milwaukee though. It came with a few bits but I haven’t purchased any Additional ones for it yet. It seems like a tool I could find many uses for if I had more accessories to go with it Anybody have suggestions on what to get as sort of a “starter kit”?
  7. I did ultimately end up calling Bader. They were very helpful (as compared to the lack of email response I experienced a couple of years ago). The wheel was stuck in the arm and just required a little persuading to drive the shaft out of the hole. To do this the bolt needed to be backed out a little and given a few light taps. I’ll post a picture below of what the wheel looks like once removed.
  8. If you can dedicate 10’x10’ of outdoor space it will probably be more than enough. I am working with the assumption that you are just getting started and will be making small items alone. If you want to build a shop with walls you will need to be able to answer the questions asked above before beginning to design it.
  9. Thomas thank you. That is how the contact wheel arm I have works too. But what I am trying to do is replace the wheels on my flat platen arm. So that way I have a contact wheel with out having to change arms every time I want to use it for something when I would otherwise be working on the flat platen (profiling of knife handles or getting the langets when working on an axe). Worst case I can swap a 2" wheel onto the contact wheel arm when I want to use it.
  10. I contacted Bader for the user manual shortly after I purchased the machine since I purchased it used. They sent me a PDF of the manual. Then I asked them a follow up question about something that wasn’t in the manual. The response; crickets. So yeah they’re not my first stop. And my question was posted I a Friday afternoon. A helpful beginner could potentially tell me about their experience right away. The office staff are likely to respond after the weekend. The manual has no information about how to change the wheels. Regarding my logic. I asked a question to a group of people with similar interests to my own, many of which have posted that they have experience with the same machine, to see if any of them had experienced a similar problem and had a solution to it. That seems like pretty sound logic to me. The only flaw in it is posting to iforgeiron and expecting a helpful answer.
  11. I haven't tried yet. My experience with manufacturers is that they always try to sell you something when you contact them (that is why they are manufacturing things). So I thought I would ask if anyone else had run into this issue already before having someone try to sell me a solution I might not need.
  12. I bought 2" contact wheels from usaknifemaker to replace the alluminum wheels on the flat platen arm of my Bader B2. I just tried to swap them out and to my surprise when I removed the bolt that I thought was holding a wheel on it was short a does not run through the wheel. Has anyone replaced these wheels before or have any idea how to remove the wheels?
  13. Paging Teenylittlemetal: Any tips? Or maybe if you have a thread on it I couldn't find you could point me in the right direction?
  14. I also have a 1/2" Mikey burner that I use outside the forge that could benefit from a smaller orifice. So I think I'll order the tubing anyway. If it doesn't improve the T burner (I think it will since going from 0.025" to 0.023" tip was an improvement) it's no loss since I can use the part anyway. If it does help than I can report back on the NARB thread about using that method to improve the burn since there is not much info on 1/2" burners in that thread.
  15. Thank you for this. It's perfect timing. I recently put together a 1/2" Frosty T 1/2" NARB and it's burning rich no matter where I position the mig tip (.023"). I was thinking of grinding out the openings on the T with a die grinder. But I'll try the hypodermic tube instead. Amazon has a tube with a 0.02775" ID for $6 for a 12" length. So unless someone can suggest a better source I will purchase it and see where it gets me.