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Mikey98118

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  1. You can even do that with your existing equipment, by placing it in, or mounting on it, a square carriage.
  2. The stupidest questions are the ones we're to timid to ask
  3. The smaller your first forge, the more you will use it. No matter how large a forge you eventually decide you will occasionally use, you will always use the smallest forge needed whenever you can, to save expense.
  4. A small pass through hole in the back is not likely to make problems; if it does, a flap can be mounted over it later.
  5. The orange exhaust flame could be bad, or not, depending on the why of it. Without a clue of what refractory you used, it could be from the calcining process (temporary), or from a heavily reducing flame, which needs burner changes, or from an undersized exhaust opening, which requires a different fix. Open up the lid after it heats to incandescence. and see if the orange flame changes--or not; that will at least provide a clue.
  6. What kind of nut? That would be a nut for 1/8-27 NPS, better known as lamp thread. What is a 1/8” IP thread? 1/8” IP or IPS (iron pipe, or iron pipe standard) thread dies and taps can be used to make lamp rod thread (1/8-27) on the outside of 1/8” water pipe (designated size; actual outside diameter of 1/8” pipe is .405”). This is parallel thread, and is not to be confused with the tapered 1/8” NPT (national pipe thread--which is tapered); this is used on the ends of pipe nipples to mount your gas fitting or needle valve to. This means that your gas jet can be easily installed on your burner,
  7. Cut a hole in the middle of the disc for your gas pipe, or threaded gas tube to slide through. Mark out three roughly equal spaces for ribs between the air openings. You need nothing more than a hex nut to show you where. Drill 1/4" or smaller holes between the areas of the ribs and well outside the area of the nut, Remember that there is no air flow in the part of the opening, so don't shortchange yourself on material in this area. So, the ribs would be fairly narrow if you kept their line parallel, but that isn't desirable. You want them to become wider as the extend toward the perip
  8. So, mounting a gas assembly has two facets; what is easy versus what is best. There can be no "perfect answer to fit all," because, aside from tooling and skill levels, we all have our "druthers." I would 'druther' have maximum control of the parts being put together. Someone else will prefer one method of assembly over another. It all depends. But, starting from the desired end, and moving backward toward a necessary beginning point, let's start with a flat sheet metal disc (yeah, year, some of you are already changing that out for a flat washer; good on ya mate). Cut the disc large enou
  9. It's past. On with the new.
  10. S0, abandoning the how-to, and back to the what and why to... Why Reducers It is necessary for incoming air to sufficiently mix with fuel gas. A swirling motion provides the most mixing for the least interference with flow. Pipe reducer fittings is a convenient ready-made form for this purpose. It has been well established that the gas pipe and whatever MIG contact tip, etc. is used for a gas orifice should be axially centered in the reducer's large opening by, whatever means is convenient. BUT, "the devil is in the details," because how you choose to mount the gas assembly
  11. Most gas forges have a closed back, or at most, contains only a very small opening in the back, to push long parts through. So the rear burner (in either kind of design) can be placed much closer to the back wall, and still its gas will be bounced forward to exit the larger exhaust opening. Therefore, the forward burner is best place closer to the middle of the forge, to increase "hang time"; this leaves more of its energy in the forge, and moves the burner's air opening(s) farther away from the spent gases. Your present forge design seems more than a little high. One more piece
  12. You know, all that sound reasonable. Just a little late coming after the fact, and from the wrong person.
  13. I'm not not okay with the move, Frosty
  14. Properly securing and balancing accessories Fully insert accessories into the rotary tool’s spindle, and snug the collet nut; don’t over tighten, or you might strip its threads, or even worse, the spindle threads. There is a good reason that collet wrenches are so tiny; take the hint. Accessory shank and collet diameters need to be properly matched. Some accessories that are sold as 1/8” actually have 3/32” shanks (popular for engraving, and nail grooming accessories). An eighth of an inch is 4/32”; 0.125”; 3.2mm (which commonly turns out to be 3.17mm). But, 3/32” shanks will en
  15. Properly securing and balancing accessories Fully insert accessories into the rotary tool’s spindle, and snug the collet nut; don’t over tighten, or you might strip its threads, or even worse, the spindle threads. There is a good reason that collet wrenches are so tiny; take the hint. Accessory shank and collet diameters need to be properly matched. Some accessories that are sold as 1/8” actually have 3/32” shanks (popular for engraving, and nail grooming accessories). An eighth of an inch is 4/32”; 0.125”; 3.2mm (which commonly turns out to be 3.17mm). But, 3/32” shanks will en
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